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Other Events 2012



  • Patrick Bond lecture on BRICS in Moscow, 15 December

  • Patrick Bond lecture at Institute for African Studies, Moscow, 13 December

  • Patrick Bond lecture on environmental commodification, 11 December
  • Khadija Sharife presentation on land-grabbed Africa at South South Forum 2, Chongqing China, 8 December

  • Patrick Bond lecture to African economic journalists on global economic governance, 6 December

  • Patrick Bond at IG Metall conference on inequality, 6 December

  • Patrick Bond on debt at Rosa Luxemburg Foundation, Berlin, 30 November

  • Faith ka-Manzi delivers UKZN World AIDS Day Lecture, 29 November

  • Patrick Bond keynote address on Climate Justice to Norwegian Development Association, 27 November

  • Patrick Bond on water rights and climate at Norwegian Development Studies panel, Oslo, 26 November

  • Patrick Bond on SA's Resource Course at Amandla! colloquium, Gauteng. 16 November

  • Events: Patrick Bond on BRICS/G20 at SA Forum for International Solidarity, 14 November

  • CCS cohosts State of Zimbabwe Transition, Diakonia, 2 November

  • Patrick Bond with Helmi Shawary at the Jozi Book Fair on Fanon in contemporary Africa, 28 October

  • Patrick Bond on South Africa resource cursed, at Manchester University, 26 October

  • Marikana Narratives and South African Political Economy, 26 October

  • Patrick Bond skype lecture to ClimateMediaFactory, Berlin, 25 October

  • Patrick Bond on the Politics of HIV/AIDS in South Africa, at Limerick University, 24 October

  • Ewok's 'Letters to Dennis' at Poetry Africa, 19 October

  • Patrick Bond debates Brazilians on the World Cup and human rights, Sao Paolo, 15 October

  • Peace Workshop, 4 October

  • Patrick Bond plenary address to Muslim Youth Movement 40th conference, 30 September

  • Patrick Bond debates KZN provincial planner, 25 September

  • Patrick Bond speaks on Resource-Cursed Southern Africa in Harare, 18 September

  • GreenSquad Alliance sponsors Nonviolence training, 21 September

  • Patrick Bond on MDGs, Redi Tlabi Radio 702 show, 25 September

  • Patrick Bond on detoxing South Durban at Umbilo community meeting, 12 September

  • Patrick Bond briefs OECD-Watch on Marikana and the SA Resource Curse, 11 September

  • Patrick Bond at the Lost in Transformation book launch seminar, 6 September

  • The Youth Wage Subsidy and its alternatives, 5 - 6 September

  • Patrick Bond debates Pravin Gordhan on South Durban's port expansion, Clairwood, 1 September

  • Patrick Bond on SA transition at Arab Spring conference, Pretoria, 30 August

  • Patrick Bond paper on environmental and social rights at Christian Michelsen Institute workshop, Norway, 27 August

  • Molefi Ndlovu on Qwasha! Durban street narratives about COP17, Christian Michelsen Institute, Norway, 26 August

  • Enviromental Teach-In, 25 August

  • CCS brainstorm on Marikana Massacre, 21 August

  • Patrick Bond lecture on White Elephants to S.Durban Community Environmental Alliance at Austerville Community Centre, 21 August

  • CCS celebrates Brutus legacy at From Roots to Fruits non-violence conference, 1 August

  • Patrick Bond lecture on African political economy to Institute for the Advancement of Journalism, Johannesburg, 26 July

  • Ewok does Durban (with a French connection), 25 July

  • Jim Kilgore meets Zimbabweans in central Durban, 23 July

  • RIO+20: THE FUTURE WE WANTED?, 17 July

  • Patrick Bond on climate justice at Johannesburg Workshop in Theory and Criticism, 5 July

  • Fidelis Allen at African politics conference, Dakar, 26 - 28 June

  • Patrick Bond on SA subimperialism and resistance, Rio+20 Intercoll.net seminar, 21 June

  • Patrick Bond at the Rio+20 Cupula dos Povos plenary, 18 June

  • CCS at the International Society for Ecological Economics conference, 17 June

  • Kim Min-Jung speaks on climate activism and the COP17, 15 June

  • Patrick Bond and Eddie Cottle discuss SA World Cup lessons for Brazil, 13 June

  • Patrick Bond at the Building and Wood Workers International, 11 June

  • Patrick Bond speaks at faculty strike support committee, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, 6 June

  • Patrick Bond lectures on carbon trading at the Brazilian Society of Political Economy, 5 June

  • Patrick Bond on debt crises at Queens University, Canada, 30 May

  • Patrick Bond gives keynote address at Sussex Univ SouthGovNet conference 16-17 May

  • Iain Ewok Robinson MCs the Brutus Sessions, 16 May

  • Patrick Bond booklaunch on climate justice at Bookmarks, London, 14 May

  • Film & discussion hosted by Green Squad Alliance, 11 May

  • Khadija Sharife talks on Tax Justice to the Economic Justice Network, 9 May

  • Patrick Bond at Comrade Babble play on Kebbleism, Johannesburg, 5 May

  • Patrick Bond skype lecture on media and climate policy, Bergen, Norway, 7 May

  • Durban can 'connect-the-dots' to climate change with 350.org, 5 May

  • CCS participates in the Global Teach - In 25 April

  • Patrick Bond talks to Hospice AGM, 25 April

  • Fidelis Allen at the Social Theory Forum at Univ.Massachusetts/Boston, 19 April

  • Molefi Ndlovu at Young Adult Review workshop of COP 17, 4 April

  • Zero Fossil Fuels meeting, 20 March

  • Patrick Bond reviews RDP for Zim opposition leaders, Nyanga, 16 March 2012

  • Trevor Ngwane at Rosa Luxemburg anti-xenophobia panel, Johannesburg, 16 March

  • Patrick Bond on climate justice at Santa Barbara Global Studies Conference, 25 February

  • Patrick Bond on service delivery protests, Nadel AGM, Mthatha, 25 February

  • Patrick Bond debates WWF's Saliem Fakier at AIDC, Cape Town, 17 February

  • Patrick Bond delivers New Zimbabwe Lecture, Harare, 15 February

  • Patrick Bond banned from delivering New Zimbabwe Lecture 8 February

  • Book signing at Sandton Square Exclusives Books, 24 January 2012



  • Patrick Bond lecture on BRICS in Moscow, 15 December

    Conference BRICS in Social Dimension December 14th, 2012

    Introductory speech:
    Boris Kagarlitsky (IGSO), Barry Gills (BRICS project), Representative of Rosa Luxemburg Stiftung.

    First plenary meeting
    BRICS countries in the context of global instability. Chances and limits for their success

    Moderator: Pavel Kudyukin (IGSO, Higher School of Economics)
    Barry Gills. The Global Crisis: An Alternative Response: Aleksandra Zhdanovskaya. WTO, BRICS and Russia
    Kevin Grey: BRICS as an object of research
    Alls Glinchikova: Civil Society in Non-Western cultures. The meaning of Russian experience

    Second plenary meeting
    Economic growth: its chances and contradictions

    Moderator: Alla Glinchikova (IGSO, Institute of Philosophy of Russian Academy of Sciences)
    Pavel Kudyukin: Is economic growth a real solution?
    Lawrence Brahm: Chinese experience and the limits of success
    Vasiliy Koltashov: Global economy in front of revolutionary change
    Aleksandr Buzgalin: Crisis, growth and development
    Andrey Kolganov: The myth of “growth based on innovation”
    Tatiana Voroxheikina: Lessons from growth and crisis in Latin America

    December 15th, 2012

    Third plenary meeting
    Idological self-identification of elites. Geopolitics instead of a progamme

    Moderator: Anna Ochkina (IGSO, Penza State University)
    Elena Galkinas: Elites of the periphery and the West
    Boris Kagarlitsky: Collapsing consensus and the return of mass politics
    Achin Vanaik: Indian ruling class in search of its ideology
    Patrick Bond: BRICS and subimperialism, the case of South Africa

    Fourth plenary meeting

    Moderator: Vasiliy Koltashov (IGSO)
    Protest and resistance to neoliberalism in BRICS countries
    Anna Ochkina: Defending the mechanisms of social reproduction: a political struggle
    Boris Kagarlitsky: There is a demand for change, but where is the supply?
    Darya Zelenova: Perspectives of social movements in South Africa

    Final remarks and conference summary
    Pavel Kudyukin: Return of growth or new development priorities?
    Boris Kagarlitsky: BRICS countries as the arena of social transformation.


    Patrick Bond lecture at Institute for African Studies, Moscow, 13 December



    13th December, 2012 in the Centre for Southern African Studies, 19-00 PM Professor Patrick Bond Senior Professor, Director of the Centre for Civil Society and School of Built Environment and Development Studies, University of KwaZulu-Natal (Durban) is giving a talk on The Marikana Massacre and South Africa's Resource Curse: Lessons for a Bottom-Up BRICS.
    >"www.inafran.ru"


    Patrick Bond lecture on environmental commodification, 11 December



    Leverhulme Centre for the Study of Value Manchester University

    Tuesday 11th December

    10.30 Coffee
    10.50 - 11.00 Introduction (Sarah Bracking)
    11.00 – 12.30 Session 1: Value in Development
    11.00 – 11.20 Development interventions and their impact (Sarah Bracking, Manchester)
    11.20 – 11.40 Allowable Death (Fortunate Machingura, Manchester)
    11.40 – 12.00 Development, value and ecological justice (Patrick Bond, University of KwaZulu-Natal)
    11.40 – 11.50 Discussant, Kevin Andrews, Senior Evaluation Advisor, DfID
    12.30 - 1.00 Sandwich lunch
    1.00 - 2.30 Session 2: Value in Conservation
    1.00 – 1.20 Biodiversity and eco-system services (Sian Sullivan, Birkbeck)
    1.20 – 1.40 Habitat banking (Louise Carver, Birkbeck)
    1.40 - 2.00 Green Uranium (Jim Igoe, Dartmouth)
    2.00 – 2.10 Discussant, (tbc)
    2.30 – 2.50coffee
    2.50 - 4. 20 Session 3: Value in the Environment
    2.50 – 3.10 Land and Water (Philip Woodhouse, Manchester)
    3.10 – 3.30 Competing conceptions of value in environmental governance (Robert Watt, Manchester)
    3.30 – 4.00 Climate change futures and the Green Climate Fund (Jonas Bruun, Manchester)
    4.00 – 4.10 Discussant, (tbc)
    4.20 -6.00 Session 4: (Re)theorising Value
    Open Discussion to discuss how the individual projects could contribute to collective work on theorising value.
    6.00 pm End


    Khadija Sharife presentation on land-grabbed Africa at South South Forum 2, Chongqing China, 8 December




    Patrick Bond lecture to African economic journalists on global economic governance, 6 December







    Dear Colleagues
    IG Metall invites you to an international conference in Berlin from December 5th to 7th 2012. With this conference we intend to debate how ecological restructuring of the economy can be linked with expansion of life opportunities and democratization of society.

    How can a change of the political course look like that brings together good working conditions, ecological reconstruction and revitalization of democracy? How can we combine solidarity, selfdetermination and ecological responsibility, representing alternatives to financial market driven capitalism?

    Implementing this change of course will require internationally coordinated activities. For this reason we are seeking the dialogue and cooperation with representatives from academia, trade unions and politics from all around the world.

    You are kindly invited to attend this conference.

    CONFERENCE PROGRAMME


    Patrick Bond at IG Metall conference on inequality, 6 December







    Dear Colleagues
    IG Metall invites you to an international conference in Berlin from December 5th to 7th 2012. With this conference we intend to debate how ecological restructuring of the economy can be linked with expansion of life opportunities and democratization of society.

    How can a change of the political course look like that brings together good working conditions, ecological reconstruction and revitalization of democracy? How can we combine solidarity, selfdetermination and ecological responsibility, representing alternatives to financial market driven capitalism?

    Implementing this change of course will require internationally coordinated activities. For this reason we are seeking the dialogue and cooperation with representatives from academia, trade unions and politics from all around the world.

    You are kindly invited to attend this conference.

    CONFERENCE PROGRAMME


    Patrick Bond on debt at Rosa Luxemburg Foundation, Berlin, 30 November



    CONFERENCE PAPERS

    Debt, uneven development and capitalist crisis in South Africa:from Marikana microfinance mashonisas to Moody’s macroeconomic monitoring
    By Patrick Bond
    Background paper 2/3 for the Rosa Luxemburg Stiftung Workshop
    Is it Possible to Have Another Economics for Another Economic Policy?
    The Debt Issue as a Challenge for Dealing with Mainstream Economics
    30 November-2 December, Berlin

    Global Economic Volatility and Slap-Dash Repairs to the International Financial Architecture
    By Patrick Bond
    Director, Centre for Civil Society and Senior Professor of Development Studies University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa

    Debt and the historical geography of South Africa’s uneven and combined development ‘Varieties of capitalism’ versus dynamics of capital accumulation
    By Patrick Bond
    Background paper 3/3 for the Rosa Luxemburg Stiftung Workshop
    Is it Possible to Have Another Economics for Another Economic Policy?
    The Debt Issue as a Challenge for Dealing with Mainstream Economics
    30 November-2 December, Berlin

    Ecological Debt and Reparations: Can the ‘Green Economy’ incorporate litigative justice and eco-debt payments, or do we need environmental justice and a redistributive ‘Basic Income Grant’?
    By Khadija Sharife and Patrick Bond
    Background paper 1/3 for the Rosa Luxemburg Stiftung Workshop
    Is it Possible to Have Another Economics for Another Economic Policy?
    The Debt Issue as a Challenge for Dealing with Mainstream Economics
    30 November-2 December, Berlin



    Sixth Workshop in the Series Is it Possible to Have Another Economics for Another Economic Policy?
    The Debt Issue as a Challenge for Dealing with Mainstream Economics, for Elaborating and Teaching Economics for Socially and Ecologically Sustainable Development, and for Social and Ecological Justice

    The workshop is the second highlight of the project “Debt”, “land grabbing” and “property”. The strategic question to be tackled here will be, if the left will be able to use the political debate on the debt issue for

  • Enlightening the multitudes of people about social and political contexts and connections behind the processes they are exposed to.

  • Critically dealing with neoliberal ideologies and mainstream economics and developing our own understanding and thinking.

  • Developing and improving our political strategies, especially by empowering, activating and organizing the multitudes of people for resistance and for autonomous work for realizing alternatives.

  • Promoting the discussion about global justice and about what kind of future we really want, connected to the work on alternatives.
    In a scientific dimension, we shall enquire into and spell out the role of debt for changes in actor configurations and individual behaviour patterns, for changes in social and gender relations, for changes in economic patterns and social structures, for changes in territorial and global disparities (including, especially, the re-emergence of neo- colonialism), for changes in the dimensions of ecological destruction, violence, etc. …


  • The focus of the workshop should be the following:
  • The debt debate as a conflicting issue in dealing with mainstream economics and a challenge for work on alternatives;


  • The potential role of economic history, history of economics, political economy, ecological and institutional economics, and morals for economic policy.


  • The workshop will discuss five interconnected questions (please regard d. as integrated in all questions and as a special issue)
    a. Neoclassical economics and the debt issue
    b. The issue of ecological debt
    c. The debt issue as a challenge for the political activation of the multitudes of people, for new political alliances and for further research
    d. Values and pluralism in economics, limits of pluralism
    e. Conclusions for further research and for academic teaching; conclusions for political education and modern left/modern socialist politics.

    Program

    30 November 12
    15:00 Welcome and Introduction of the Project
    15:20Mika Minio-Paluello: The Debt Issue in the Focus of Political, Ideological and Scientific Battles
    15:45 Patrick Bond: Debt, Uneven Development and Ecological Destruction in
    Southern Africa: The First 200 Years
    16:10 Comment of Nicola Bullard
    16:20 Comment of Ewa Charkiewicz
    16:30 Comment of Dina Makram
    16:40 Coffee Break
    17:10 Discussion
    18:10 Remarks by Mika Minio-Paluello, Patrick Bond
    18:20 Joachim Spangenberg: Reflections of the First Workshop Part.
    18:30 End of the First Workshop Day
    18:35 Snacks in the RLF

    1 December 2012
    10:00 Steve Keen: The Debt Issue in Mainstream Economics
    10:30 Dany Lang: The Debt Issue as a Way of Constitutionalising Neoliberal
    Supply-Side Oriented Policies?
    10:50 Bob Jessop: The Economic Crisis and the Crisis of Economics
    11:10 Comment of Susan Newman
    11:20 Comment of Lutz Brangsch
    11:30 Coffee Break
    11:50 Peter Söderbaum: Markets in the light of political-economic actors
    and Democracy
    12:10 Comment of Jenny Simon
    12:20 Comment of Saso Slacek
    12:30 Discussion
    13:30 Remarks by Steve Keen, Peter Söderbaum, Bob Jessop, Dany Lang
    13:50 Lunch Break
    14:30Roberto Musacchio: Ecology and Debt
    14:50 Gianmarco de Pieri: Commons and Debt: Polar Opposites in a New Paradigm
    15:10 Leo Seserko: Privatisation of Public Goods in the Current Global Financial Crisis – The Monument Coliseum in Ljubljana
    15:30 Comment of Kate Bayliss
    15:40 Comment of Asta Vrecko
    15:50 Comment of Julian Wells
    16:00 Discussion
    16:40 Coffee Break
    17:00 Remarks by Roberto Musacchio, Gianmarco de Pieri, Leo Seserko
    17:20 Malgorzata Dereniowska: Ecological Debt and its Ethical ambiguities.
    Pluralism and Conditions for Paradigm Co-existence in Economics
    17:40 Comment of Barbara Muraca
    17:50 John E. Reardon: How We Can Change Economics Education so that the Crucial Role of Debt in All its Aspects
    18:10 Comment of Andrea Lagna
    18:20 Discussion
    19:10 Remarks by Malgorzata Dereniowska, John E. Reardon
    19:20 Reflexions by Frieder Otto Wolf
    19:30 End of the 2. Workshop day
    Conference dinner

    2 December 2012
    10:00 Reflections by Asta Vrecko, Andrea Lagna, Lutz Brangsch
    10:30 Discussion
    11:30 Coffee Break
    11:45 And now? - Reflections by Mika Minio-Paluello
    11:55 Discussion
    12:50 Reflections and Concluding Remarks: Judith Dellheim
    13:00 End of the workshop
    Snacks in the RLF


    Faith ka-Manzi delivers UKZN World AIDS Day Lecture, 29 November




    FAITH KA-MANZI


    FAITH KA-MANZI is a South African writer and poet who has been living in Cato Manor for more than a decade. Born almost 45 years ago in Durban, she was awarded a Bachelor of Arts in Humanities at the then University of Natal now (UKZN) in 1999 majoring in English and History. She is a former mainstream media journalist for Daily News (with a column – Keeping the Faith), Mail&Guardian, SAPA, Business Day, SundayWorld, SABC among others.

    Faith is now based at the University of Kwa-Zulu Natal where she writes and translates works mainly advocating socio-economic, political and environmental issues pertaining to civil society,especially the poor. She is also a columnist for The Africa Report ezine, The Faith Diaries, where she writes about challenges she has been confronted with by living with HIV/Aids and coping mechanisms.

    Faith ka-Manzi also does motivational speaking urging people to know their status and those who live with the virus not to lose hope. Among other corporates and organizations Faith has motivated include Telkom, Portnet and the Ethekwini Municipality.




    Patrick Bond keynote address on Climate Justice to Norwegian Development Association, 27 November



    CONFERENCE PROGRAMME


    Patrick Bond on water rights and climate at Norwegian Development Studies panel, Oslo, 26 November



    Water rights, climate, ecosytem services and
    post-neoliberal strategy from Johannesburg to Rio+20: A critique of liberal NGO and neoliberal Green Economy narratives

    By Patrick Bond
    Paper presented at the NFU Conference 2012, ‘Development for a Finite Planet’ Oslo Centre for Interdisciplinary Environmental and Social Research, 26 November 2012

    CONFERENCE PROGRAMME



    Panel Proposal Climate Change discourse, rights and the poor Siri Gloppen and Asuncion St. Clair Chr. Michelsens Institute-CICERO
    The panel presents 5 papers resulting from the NFR funded research project Climate Change Discourse, Rights and the Poor:

    Paper 1: Red-Green Lawfare? Climate Change Discourses in Courtrooms
    Siri Gloppen and Catalina Vallejo-CMI

    Climate change presents enormous governance challenges. Failure of political bodies to regulate for effective – and fair – mitigation and adaptation has sparked alternative strategies from activist trying to force action. This includes lodging cases in courts and quasi-legal bodies at national and international level. The paper examines how discourses on climate change play out in the courtrooms with particular focus on whether and how issues of distributive justice and social rights feature in these cases.

    The first part of the paper presents a typology of legal claims and arguments used in court cases dealing with climate change. The cases fall in four broad categories:

    (a) cases seeking to force (national or local) authorities to adopt and enforce emission regulations and other mitigation measures; (b) cases requesting adaptation measures; (c) cases claiming compensation (from private companies as well as public authorities) for damages caused by climate change; (d) cases contesting (private or public) mitigation or adaptation measures due to negative (side)effects. All categories of cases potentially include aspects of social justice.
    The second part of the paper looks at how courts have responded in a selection of cases. Focus is on what can be seen as core or paradigmatic climate change cases, that is, cases that engage one or more of the following “intractable” features of climate change:
    1. The transnational and “free rider” character of the problem: (Causes as well as consequences of climate change cross all borders – and those who suffer most have often contributed the least. That no political authority “owns” the problem and the potential solution give rise to collective action problems.)
    2. Long time horizon: (consequences materialize much later. This holds not only for current emissions, but also for – costly – mitigation measures. Decision-makers will not suffer the harm of climate change, or experience the benefits of mitigation efforts, only bear the costs of the latter.)
    3. Attribution problems. (While there is broad agreement in the scientific community that the climate is changing, natural variability and scientific uncertainty make it difficult to determine effectiveness of mitigation and adaption measures – and even more so, to attribute responsibility for particular harms.)

    Paper 2: Water rights, climate, ‘environmental services’ and post-neoliberal strategy from Johannesburg to Rio+20:
    A critique of liberal NGO and neoliberal Green Economy narratives
    Patrick Bond, University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

    A rights-based climate agenda can potentially challenge the dominant market narrative with respect to climate change reparations, adaptation and mitigation in the countries least responsible for the crisis. But learning from the case of water in the most advanced court challenge to neoliberal state power that has yet been adjudicated, in Johannesburg in 2009, it is just as likely that rights-talk can be coopted by neoliberalism. If that happens more systematically within the climate justice struggle in which court cases will emerge more frequently, momentum towards a genuine breakthrough against ‘Green Economy’ corporate control of global environmental governance could well be distracted. The classical problems associated with rights-based narratives – liberal individualism and their disconnection from broader socio-economic and ecological processes – may continue to be crippling, as witnessed in the example of South African water policy, law and activism. And like the threat from a Paris-based water privatization company (Suez) to Soweto women who sued the city to change policies, the Rio+20 Earth Summit made these ideological arguments yet more critical. There ,the endorsement of market determinations of nature require a stronger countervailing ‘decommodification’ narrative. But the question posed here, is whether using human rights considerations will make this task any easier, and the answer arrived at is negative.

    PAPER 3: WHY CAN’T WE BE FRIENDS? ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIO-ECONOMIC RIGHTS IN THE COURTS
    Jackie Dugard and Anna Alcaro

    Jackie Dugard is executive director of the Socio-Economic Rights Institute of South Africa (SERI) and visiting senior fellow at the school of law, University of the Witwatersrand. Anna Alcaro is a Fulbright fellow at SERI

    ABSTRACT
    Under apartheid poor (black) people and the environment were viewed as antithetical. Poor communities were forcibly relocated to establish or expand game reserves and a range of militaristic interventions were imposed to ‘protect nature’, often at the expense of human rights. The environment was overwhelmingly associated as the preserve of the middle class and as preoccupied with saving plants and animals. Under the post-apartheid dispensation, broad environmental rights are constitutionally-entrenched alongside socio-economic rights. But, to what extent does this imply an amicable relationship between environmental and socio-economic rights?

    PAPER 4: THE ROLE OF POVERTY AND SOCIAL JUSTICE IN SOUTH AFRICA’S ‘NATIONAL CLIMATE CHANGE RESPONSE WHITE PAPER’
    KJERSTI FLØTTUM & ØYVIND GJERSTAD, UNIVERSITY OF BERGEN


    ABSTRACT
    In late 2011 the South African government published a white paper outlining climate change response policies for the coming decades. Among the main topics of the text were the socio-economic and climatic vulnerabilities of the country, including the situation of the poor. With the aim of analysing the argumentation regarding climate change and poverty alleviation we develop a combined linguistic and discursive approach, starting
    with occurrences of keywords pertaining to poverty, equity and rights. We then explore the white paper’s conceptualisation of climate change as a narrative, at the level of the text as a whole. This combined analysis shows that the legal rights of the poor are hardly given any place in the argumentation, whereas less constricting political intentions are far more present. Furthermore, the text attributes a passive role to the poor, dependent on the benevolence of a government which attributes the role of hero to itself.

    Paper 5: An Analysis of the Human Development Report 2011 Sustainability and Equity: A Better Future for All
    Des Gasper, Ana Victoria Portocarrero, Asuncion Lera St.Clair
    Institute of Social Science, Erasmus University, the Hague and CICERO

    The global Human Development Report (HDR) prepared for UNDP appears annually. The Report that appeared in the run-up to the United Nations conference on Sustainable Development, the ‘Rio+20’ conference of 2012, was the Human Development Report 2011, entitled “Sustainability and Equity: A Better Future for All”. As such it constitutes an attempted major statement. Recent papers have analysed its predecessor on climate change and development, the 2007-8 HDR, and compared it with the World Bank’s 2010 World Development Report (WDR) on the same subject (Fløttum and Dahl, 2012; Gasper, Portocarrero, St.Clair 2011). Gasper et al. (2011) found major differences in diagnosis, yet a surprising, given those differences, degree of similarity in policy proposals. The HDR 2007/8 appeared thus in some respects schizophrenic.

    The present paper askes in which direction the thinking on environment and sustainability by UNDP’s Human Development Report Office has evolved since the HDR 2007/8, which combined a radical human rights-based diagnosis and critique with a largely conventional economic set of policy proposals, mostly close to those in the WDR 2010. Frame analysis of HDR 2011 indicates its convergence further towards a World Bank perspective: inside the frame are LDCs and a certain range of permitted issues, including ‘extending freedoms’, while largely outside the frame are rich countries, global relations, restricting some freedoms, and even, to a surprising and disturbing extent, climate change mitigation. Lexical analysis, comparing word choices, corroborates this picture.

    The HDR 2011 is surprisingly muted on issues of climate change, and does not address key aspects including the need to radically cut greenhouse gas emissions. In the 2007/08 report, by contrast, the case for such radical action was made forcefully. HDR 2011’s area of main focus is the relationship between environmental degradation and the promotion of human development, including issues of gender and democratic participation. Not all the links it proposes there are strong, and some are problematic. Emphasis on the political dimensions of climate change and poverty is made only at the local and national levels, leaving invisible the issues of power at the global level.

    Overall the report appears a markedly diluted version of the HDR 2007/2008, and much closer in perspective to the World Bank. This resolution of the 2007/8 Report’s schizophrenia is consistent with the backgrounds of the staff who were in charge


    Patrick Bond on SA's Resource Course at Amandla! colloquium, Gauteng. 16 November



    Amandla! Colloquium
    The Low Wage Regime in Post-Apartheid South Africa and the Struggle for a Wage-Led and Sustainable Growth Path Heia Safari Ranch, Muldersdrift, JOHANNESBURG, 16-18 of November,

    Friday 16th of November
    Welcome, Information and Introduction 9.00 – 9.30 1.
    SA within the global economic crisis 9.30 – 11.30
    a. The dynamics of the global crisis – Alan Freeman; 40’
    b. Features of the European crisis – Özlem Onaran, 40’
    c. The crisis in Southern Africa – Azwell Banda; 40’, 2. The changing nature of SA capitalism?
    11.40 – 13.00 a. Accumulation strategies and the MEC – Seeraj Mohamed , 40’
    b. SA’s twin economic and resources crisis – Mark Swilling, 40’
    Lunch 13.00 -14.00
    3. The changing nature of SA capitalism?
    Continuing: 14.00 – 15.30 c. Evolution of macro-economic policy from reconstruction to industrialisation through mineral extraction – Asghar Adelzade, 40’
    d. The Resource Curse and overlapping forms of super-exploitation – Patrick Bond, 40’
    Tea break 15.30 – 15.45
    4. South Africa’s low wage regime, 15.45 – 18.00 a. Women with low wages in a restructured work force – Nina Benjamin; 40 b. Labour restructuring and the growth of the precariat – Alex Mashilo; 40 c. The Need for a Minimum Wage – Neil Coleman; 40

    Saturday, 17th of November
    9.00 – 9.15 Welcome and organising the agenda for the day 5. The workings of the low wage regime, 9.15 – 13.00 a. The unemployment crises and the attack on the post 1994 labour legislation – Rudi Dicks, to be confirmed, 40 b. The place of women’s in the Mineral Energy Complex – Samantha Hargreaves; 40’
    c. Real conditions of mine workers in SA Platinum and Coal industry – David Van Wyk; 40’
    d. The real conditions of agricultural workers – Karin Kleinbooi to be confirmed; 40’.
    Discussion – further sector contributions.
    6. Lunch 13.00 – 14.00
    7. The workings of the low wage regime, continuing, 14.00 – 15.30 f. The scope of labour broking in SA – Niall Reddy, 40’
    g. The wages – profits gap in SA: Debating ‘affordability’ of wage increases – Dick Forslund; 40’
    15.30 – 15.45 Tea break
    8. Strategies towards a wage-led and sustainable growth path?, 15.45 – 18.00 a. The case for wage-led development -- Radhika Desai, 40’
    b. What is sustainable growth; what is sustainable development? – Muna Lakhani, 40’
    c. A Growth Path for Full Employment in South Africa – Chris Malikane, 40’

    Sunday 18th
    9. Strategies towards a wage-led and sustainable growth path? 9.00-11:00
    a. The campaign for a living wage and the National Minimum Wage – Jane
    Barrett, 40’
    b. Lessons from Marikana – Gavin Hartford, 40’
    c. The Sugar Plantation workers’ struggle for a living wage strikes on
    Mauritius – Ashuk Subron, 40’
    Tea brake 11.00-11.15
    10. Strategies towards a wage-led and sustainable growth path? 11.15-13:00
    Introducing a wage-led and sustainable growth path in SA: Building a way
    forward together; 20’ – Brian Ashley
    This final session of the colloquium summarises final group and plenary
    discussions on strategies for
    - The fight for a living wage and sustainable livelihoods
    - Trade union and community strategies for higher incomes
    - The fight for security against labour broking and precarious employment
    - Media strategies
    - Continued research, activism and collaboration
    Ends at 13:00


    Events: Patrick Bond on BRICS/G20 at SA Forum for International Solidarity, 14 November



    SOUTH AFRICA FORUM FOR INTERNATIONAL SOLIDARITY (SAFIS)
    EVENT: WORKSHOP ON BRICS AND THE G20
    VENUE: CIVICUS HOUSE, 24 GIGWI MRWEBI STREET, NEWTOWN

    DATE: NOVEMBER 14TH 2012
    TIME: 1-4PM

    On November 15th, 2012, The Economic Justice Network (EJN), University of KwaZulu-Natal Centre for Civil Society (CCS), groundWork (gW), South Durban Community Environmental Alliance (SDCEA) and the South Africa Forum for International Solidarity (SAFIS) will co-host a critical discussion and strategy meeting to inform civil society engagement with the upcoming BRICS Summit on 26-27 March 2013 in Durban, South Africa.
    On November 14th, 2012, SAFIS will host a 4 hour workshop on BRICS and the G20. The workshop precedes the November 15th meeting and is a platform for activists to develop their knowledge on BRICS, the G20, mobilise each other and explore strategies for building a people’s agenda for a progressive internationalism in relation to these multilateral economic and other forums.


    WORKSHOP PROGRAMME
    Facilitator: Rajesh Latchman
    1h00-1h30: Finger lunch
    1h30-1h40: Welcoming remarks 13h40-2h30 (Presenters each give 10-12 minute inputs)

    1. THE CURRENT STATE OF OUR WORLD
    • World political and economic trends - the crisis continues
    • World geopolitical and ideological trends - the shifting balance of forces
    Bongani Masuku, COSATU International Secretary

    2. THE G20 AND BRICS – A CRITICAL PERSPECTIVE
    • An overview of the G20 and its relationship with BRICS
    • The BRICS countries' internal features
    • BRICS and their corporates in their respective regions and in Africa
    • Who are our friends in BRICS countries and what are they saying and doing?
    Patrick Bond, Director, Centre for Civil Society (CCS) & Memory Dube, South African Institute for International Affairs

    3. SOUTH AFRICA, THE G20 AND BRICS
    • SA's post-apartheid multilateral strategies and dynamics;
    • South Africa’s role and place in BRICS
    Dr Candice Moore, Lecturer, Department of Politics, Faculty of Humanities, University of Johannesburg

    2h30-3pm: Questions and discussion
    3-3h10: Tea break
    3h10-4h10pm: The BRICS Summit in Durban, 2013– What of a people’s Summit?
    • Lessons from previous Summits

    For more information, please contact: Siphomthathi@gmail.com/ +27 71 6358668


    CCS cohosts State of Zimbabwe Transition, Diakonia, 2 November



    The Crisis in Zimbabwe Coalition and the Centre for Civil Society (CCS) invite you to a public meeting under the Zimbabwe Transitional Dialogue Series.

    Date: Friday 2 November 2012,
    Time: 17:00hrs-19:30hrs,
    Venue: Diakonia Centre, 20 Diakonia Avenue, Durban- South Africa

    Chairing: Corlert Letlojane-Human Rights Institute of South Africa (HURISA)

  • Welcome remarks


  • Briefing and analysis of the state of the Zimbabwe Transition focusing on Constitution and Elections
  • Briefing by Paul Mangwana- Zimbabwe African National Union- Patriotic Front (ZANU PF) (led by President Mugabe)

  • Briefing by Hon Douglas Mwonzora - Movement for Democratic Change (MDC led by Prime minister Tsvangirai)

  • Briefing by Qhubani Moyo-Movement for Democratic Change- (MDC led by Professor Welshman Ncube)


  • A critique of the Transitional processes
  • Critique by Professor Lovemore Madhuku-National Constitutional Assembly(NCA)


  • Plenary Discussion
  • Questions and contributions from the floor


  • Brief summary of main issues raised by the chair
    Vote of Thanks….Dr. Phillan Zamchiya

    Your ongoing solidarity is appreciated!



    For more details contact

    Tafadzwa Maguchu
    Media Officer
    Crisis in Zimbabwe Coalition - Regional Office (S.A) 711, 7th Floor, Khotso House
    62 Marshall Street
    Marshalltown
    Johannesburg, 2001
    South Africa
    Mobile: +27-784 254 227
    Phone: +27-11-838 9642
    Fax: +27-86-296 9577
    Website: www.crisiszimbabwe.org
    Twitter: http://twitter.com/CrisisinZim
    Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Crisis-in-Zimbabwe-Coalition-Regional-Office-SA/133139420038012?v=wall




    Patrick Bond with Helmi Shawary at the Jozi Book Fair on Fanon in contemporary Africa, 28 October

    Sharawy in Conversation: Frantz Fanon and the crisis of the post-independence elite: the case of Egypt and South Africa with Patrick Bond.
    classicfeel.co.za


    Patrick Bond on South Africa resource cursed, at Manchester University, 26 October




    Marikana Narratives and South African Political Economy, 26 October



    Speaker: Patrick Bond
    Venue: Conference Auditorium 2

    The Global Development research group have organised a series of seminars with guest speakers for 2012'13.

    The series is titled: 'Global Crisis and the Developing World'

    The seminars are open to staff and students from across the University – all are welcome.

    We are pleased to welcome Prof. Patrick Bond (University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa) who will be presenting on 'Marikana Narratives and South African Political Economy.'

    Patrick Bond is a political economist and senior professor at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, School of Development Studies in Durban, where he directs the Centre for Civil Society.

    Working closely with activist/advocacy organizations – which he argues often produce vital systemic knowledge through structural conflict – Patrick’s research addresses political ecology (especially climate, energy and water), economic crisis, social mobilization, public policy and geopolitics.

    Amongst his authored, edited and coedited books are: Politics of Climate Justice (2012); Durban’s Climate Gamble (2011); Zuma’s Own Goal (2010); Climate Change, Carbon Trading and Civil Society (2009); The Accumulation of Capital in Southern Africa (2007); Looting Africa (2006); Talk Left, Walk Right (2006); Fanon’s Warning (2005); Elite Transition (2005); Zimbabwe’s Plunge (2003); Against Global Apartheid (2003); Unsustainable South Africa (2002); Cities of Gold, Townships of Coal (2000); and Uneven Zimbabwe (1998).

    In service to the new South African government from 1994-2002, Patrick authored/edited more than a dozen policy papers, including the Reconstruction and Development Programme and RDP White Paper. He has lectured at more than 70 universities across the world, with formal academic affiliations in the US, Canada, Zimbabwe, Hungary, Korea, Japan and South Africa.

    Patrick earned his doctorate in economic geography under the supervision of David Harvey at Johns Hopkins in 1993, after studying finance at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School, classical guitar at the Peabody Conservatory and economics at Swarthmore College, and working as a Federal Reserve Bank examiner in Philadelphia and journalist/researcher in Washington.

    His most profound education, though, was promoting sanctions in the US student anti-apartheid movement. He was born in Belfast, Northern Ireland in 1961 and has lived since 1990 in South Africa – initially working in NGOs and then Wits University’s Graduate School of Public and Development Manaegement – and since 2004 in Durban, where he has two children and is unsuccessfully learning to surf.
    www.polis.leeds.ac.uk/about/events/guest-seminar-marikana-narratives-and-south-african-political-economy.php


    Patrick Bond skype lecture to ClimateMediaFactory, Berlin, 25 October

    www.storyofcapandtrade.org
    www.climatemediafactory.de

    Programm - Abschlussveranstaltung Climate Media Factory, CMF – 25.10.2012 an der Hochschule für Film und Fernsehen „Konrad Wolf“ (HFF) in Potsdam-Babelsberg

    09:00 – 10:00 Uhr Check–in
    10:00 Begrüßung Prof. Dr. Dieter Wiedemann Präsident der Hochschule für Film und Fernsehen „Konrad Wolf“ Potsdam-Babelsberg - Großer Kinosaal
    - 10:30 Uhr Grußworte Thomas Rachel - Parl. Staatssekretär Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung, Reiner Walleser - Ministerium für Wissenschaft, Forschung und Kultur – Land Brandenburg - Großer Kinosaal
    10:30 – 11:15 Uhr Impulsreferat Prof. Dr. Friedrich-Wilhelm Gerstengarbe - stellvertretender Direktor des Potsdam-Instituts
    für Klimafolgenforschung (PIK) - Großer Kinosaal
    11:15 – 12:15 Uhr Vorstellung CMF Prof. Dr. Jürgen Kropp (PIK), Prof. Dr. Klaus-Dieter Müller (HFF), Ephraim Broschkowski (CMF), Dr. Bernd Hezel (CMF) - Großer Kinosaal
    12:15 – 13:15 Uhr Mittagspause Foyer
    13:15 – 14:45 Uhr - Panel I Perspektiven der audio-visuellen Klimakommunikation im Spannungsfeld von wissenschaftlicher Seriosität und Publikumsakzeptanz - Großer Kinosaal

    MODERATION: Prof. Dr. Klaus–Dieter Müller (HFF)
    PANELISTEN:
    Dr. Joachim Borner, Kolleg für Management & Gestaltung nachhaltiger Entwicklung gGmbH
    Prof. Dr. Jürgen Kropp, PIK - Research Area: Climate Change & Development
    Christoph Lanz, Deutschen Welle
    Sven Sund, Saxonia Media Filmproduktion GmbH

    13:15 – 14:45 Uhr - Panel II Green Film Initiative - Raum 1434
    MODERATION: Michael Geidel (CMF)

    VORTRÄGE:
    Katie Carpenter und Mari Jo Winkler von PGA Green
    Baptiste Heynemann, Ecoprod
    Christelle Wolff, Peacefulfish Productions Ltd.

    PANELISTEN:
    Ernst Feiler, Grundy UFA TV Produktions GmbH
    Pit Krause, Allianz Deutscher Produzenten - Film und Fernsehen e.V.
    Dr. Dietrich Reupke, Referat Medien- und Rundfunkangelegenheiten in der Senatskanzlei Berlin
    Christiane Scholz, Filmförderung Hamburg Schleswig-Holstein GmbH
    14:45 – 15:45 Uhr - Filme Best Practice - Großer Kinosaal
    MODERATION: Johanna Ickert (Regisseurin)
    PANELISTEN:
    Up in Smoke - Adam Wakeling (Regisseur)
    Story of Cap & Trade - Prof. Dr. Patrick Bond (Centre for Civil Society
University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa)
    15:45 – 17:00 Uhr Get–together Foyer



    Die Climate Media Factory (CMF) ist ein interdisziplinäres Projekt der HFF und des PIK:

    CLIMATE MEDIA FACTORY Projektleiter:
    Friedrich–Ebert–Straße 82 Prof. Dr. Jürgen Kropp (PIK)
    14469 Potsdam Prof. Dr. Klaus–Dieter Müller (HFF)
    Tel.: +49 (0)331 20 16 58-0
    Fax: +49 (0)331 20 16 58-18
    info@climatemedia.de


    Patrick Bond on the Politics of HIV/AIDS in South Africa, at Limerick University, 24 October

    Notes from input to University of Limerick workshop on public administration and AIDS

    UL Leads Research to Investigate Impact of Public Administration Systems on HIV/AID Policies
    Wednesday, 24th October 2012 Tags: Jan O'Sullivan T.D., HIV-Aids, Public Administration, Irish Aid, University of KwaZulu Natal, Makerere University, University of Dar es Salaam, Uganda, South Africa,

    A University of Limerick-led research initiative into the impact public administration systems has on effective HIV/AIDS policies received €578,784 funding from Irish Aid in its programme of Strategic Cooperation with Higher Education and Research Institutes.

    Working in partnership with the University of KwaZulu Natal, South Africa, University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, and Makerere University, Uganda the project seeks to optimise the use of health system resources to more effectively address the HIV/AIDS epidemic.

    Speaking at the launch, Minister of State, Jan O’Sullivan said; “During my time as Minister for Overseas Development Aid I saw at first hand the tremendous progress that can be achieved in tackling HIV/ AIDS in Africa. The best results for communities were achieved where voluntary organisations and local and government strategies were aligned. Tackling this crisis in partnership is the key to success. This new research project, led by the University of Limerick, has the capacity to identify the structures that work best, highlight where systems are currently failing and establish best practice solutions that assist in our battle against this devastating disease. Much positive work in combatting HIV/AIDs have been achieved in Africa and the past decade has seen a decrease in infection rates. This project can build on that success and I wish UL and their partners across Africa every success with this important project.”

    The project examines the relationships between actors in the complex networks which shape the implementation of HIV/AIDS policy. It will identify criteria that determine optimal policy implementation, while employing an emancipatory approach which treats the research process itself as a means to promote the development of sustainable networks, capabilities and pro-poor policy outcomes. By partnering with universities in Africa, the project will strengthen relationships and synergies between these institutions to support innovative approaches to policy analysis, and will also deepen the capacity of the Southern institutions to promote effective administration of health policies in their local settings.

    Professor Tom Lodge, Dean, Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences, UL explains the significance of the project; “The current figures show that more than 20 million people are infected by HIV/AIDS in Africa. Infection rates compared to a decade ago are down and they are reducing further but it is still the case that nearly two Africans people a year are becoming HIV-positive. Around 7 million are receiving treatment: much more needs to be done to help those who are affected directly. The critical work is in prevention. There are many success stories here which we can learn from. Applying these lessons in areas and among groups where they are most needed remains a key challenge. Often the most vulnerable people live in vicinities in which public administrations are very weak, whether with respect to the provision or support for primary health care, or in helping to promote behavioural changes through public education or in creating a safer environment for women. Our project will be focusing on efforts to address these challenges”.

    This project is funded by Irish Aid, Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade and the Higher Education Authority.
    www.ul.ie


    Ewok's 'Letters to Dennis' at Poetry Africa, 19 October

    VENUE: SNEDDON THEATRE
    7.30 pm: performances by Croc e Moses (South Africa), Poppy Seed (United Kingdom), Jessica Mbangeni (South Africa), Henry Bowers (Sweden), and to close the evening, Letters to Dennis: Ewok (South Africa) — in honour of Dennis Brutus (1924-2009).

    DENNIS BRUTUS COMMUNITY SCHOLAR EWOK Popular Durban spoken word artist Iain Ewok Robinson operates on any stage, from classical Shakespeare, to smoky slam, to hard-hitting Hip Hop. One half of MC duo Illuminating Shadows, Freestyle Battle Champion (African Hip Hop Indaba 2004), Slam competitor (5th place World Slampionship Rotterdam 2005, 1st Place Poetry Africa Slamjam 2007 Johannesburg/Durban) and theatre practitioner, Ewok spent 2006 travelling South Africa with his first one-man Hip Hop theatre piece One Mind, One Mouth, One Mic. The show combines his Hip Hop and theatre lifestyles in a 50 minute non-stop lyrical air strike.

    In 2007, Ewok debuted his second one man Hip Hop theatre piece Spitfire, winning two awards at the MUSHO! Theatre Festival in Durban. His other shows include Bombstyle (2008) and Iain EWOK Robinson is LIVE! (2010). His debut album Higher Flyer For Hire was released independently in 2007 and Echoing Green Press published his first book of poetry and lyrics, Word: Customized Hype in November of that year.

    Ewok’s other releases include Spoken Word flavoured Electronica influenced Glitch to the Hip Hop Spitmunky (2010), The Psycles E.P. (Illuminating Shadows 2009), Pimp My Poetry (2nd collection of Spoken Word text, Echoing Green Press 2010) and the Cats From Underdog Country project (2010).

    Hip Hop and poetry have seen Ewok perform on numerous world stages, including at the Rotterdam 36th Poetry International Festival in 2005, HIFA 2009 in Zimbabwe, Uppsala International Poetry Festival in 2010, and most recently the 21st Medellin International Poetry Festival (Colombia).

    2010 saw the launch of “Poetry off the Page”, a ten module Poetry course aimed at Grades 11 and 12 English scholars.

    Seriously? is the 5th one-man theatre show written and performed by Ewok and shows at the Elizabeth Sneddon Theatre in September 2012.


    Patrick Bond debates Brazilians on the World Cup and human rights, Sao Paolo, 15 October



    World Cup, Olympic Games » Who’ll be the Winner?
    Who’s going to win the 2014 World Cup? What about the 2016 Olympic Games? Who’s going to lose? And what, ultimately, is at stake? The second edition of the event “Dialogue Conectas & Livraria Cultura”, in São Paulo, will discuss the impact that mega-events have on human rights

    October 8, 2012



    Brazil is spending billions of dollars on infrastructure for two major sporting events: the World Cup and the Olympic Games. The construction work involves urbanistic, logistic and human transformations. But who wins and who loses from this massive rearrangement?

    Excavators and bulldozers are tearing down slums, people are being evicted from their homes, rents are increasing, speculation is on the rise and many people are asking themselves: who is behind all the machines? Where are they headed next? What are they leaving behind them? What is the relationship between the World Cup and the Olympics and human rights?

    To debate these questions that go beyond the world of sports, the second edition of “Dialogue Conectas & Livraria Cultura” (see the first edition Internet and Revolutions: Changing the World with a Click?), to be held at 7 PM on October 15, at the Livraria Cultura bookstore on Avenida Paulista 2073, has invited the guests Raí Oliveira, founder and director of the Athletes for Active Citizenship Association and president of the Gol de Letra Foundation, Cláudia Fávaro, of the People’s Committee for the World Cup, based in Porto Alegre, and Patrick Bondm, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    The debate will also be joined remotely, by video, by Raquel Rolnik, the UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Adequate Housing, and Danny Jordaan, executive officer of the FIFA Committee for the 2010 World Cup in South Africa.

    DRAFT PROGRAMME



    + Debate
    Watch the video that former soccer player Raí Oliveira recorded especially for Dialogue Conectas & Culture Bookstore on the impact of the World Cup and the Olympics on human rights. Raí is member of the board of Athletes for Active Citizenship.

    The full video (14.42 min) is available at Vimeo.





    + Archives
    Remember the previous event
    “Internet and revolutions: Changing the World with a Click?”





    + Agenda
    “World Cup and Olympic Games: Who’ll be the Winner?”
    October 15, from 7 PM to 9 PM
    Eva Herz Theater of the Livraria Cultura bookstore
    Avenida Paulista, no. 2073
    Debaters: Raí Oliveira (Athletes for Active Citizenship / Gol de Letra); Cláudia Fávaro, of the People’s Committee for the World Cup, based in Porto Alegre and Patrick Bond, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    Organization: Conectas Human Rights and Livraria Cultura
    Sponsors: EiViu! and Fora do Eixo

    168 places, of which 4 accommodate wheelchairs
    Free entry on a first-come basis



    Exibir mapa ampliado

    Organization:




    PHOTOS







    CIDADES SUSTENTÁVEIS

    Unir o verde e o vermelho

    Em entrevista, o economista político Patrick Bond, diretor do Center for Civil Society da Universidade de KwaZulu-Natal, em Durban (África do Sul), e ativista de movimentos sociais, defende que a construção de cidades sustentáveis passa pela aliança da agenda ambientalista com a da justiça social

    por Silvio Caccia Bava

    Le Monde Diplomatique Brasil – Gostaria de começar perguntando o que você entende por sustentabilidade, o que isso significa.

    Patrick Bond – O significado clássico, formulado há 25 anos pela comissão Brundtland, fala que os direitos das gerações futuras não devem ser comprometidos pelo que fazemos hoje e que é fundamental que os direitos das pessoas pobres sejam colocados em primeiro lugar. Ao lado da opção preferencial dos pobres, como Leonardo Boff e a Teologia da Libertação pregam, está o limite ecológico ao crescimento, causado por formas organizacionais tecnológicas e sociais.

    Diplomatique – Entendemos claramente o que é insustentável e insustentabilidade, mas não está claro o que é sustentabilidade, entendida de várias maneiras. Como você prefere lidar com o tema?

    Bond – Há dez anos recebemos a Rio+10 em Johannesburgo. E uma das revelações mais interessantes foi o entendimento da cooptação corporativa. As empresas usavam as palavras “desenvolvimento sustentável”, mas o que queriam dizer era muito diferente. O lucro, a autorregulação, o comércio injusto foram travestidos sob a denominação da economia verde, que transforma a natureza em uma commodity. Sentimos isso dez anos atrás com algo que vocês conheceram na América Latina – a privatização da água nas cidades. Johannesburgo foi um dos principais locais de resistência e, finalmente, essa empresa francesa [Suez] foi expulsa em 2006 por causa das manifestações em Soweto.

    Também sentimos isso com a privatização do ar nas cidades, ou seja, o mercado de carbono, porque o programa piloto em 2002 foi em Durban, onde eu morava. O metano é proveniente de lixo podre, e querem capturá-lo e transformá-lo em energia elétrica.

    Descobrimos na época que a visão de sustentabilidade deles estava completamente oposta à dos ativistas sociais que viviam naquela área. A proposta destes era fechar o lixão, porque era um lixão de apartheid. E o Banco Mundial veio dizer que não, que seria sustentável manter o aterro, mas apenas para capturar o metano e transformá-lo em energia elétrica para o mercado de carbono. Foi lá que o desenvolvimento sustentável, na visão do Banco Mundial, se transformou em uma iniciativa de privatizar o ar e a água, isso em um lugar como Johannesburgo, a cidade mais desigual do país, mais desigual do mundo, porque já ultrapassamos o Brasil.

    A proposta da economia verde está em um ambiente de tanto conflito que eu volto ao que Brundtland disse: não se trata só da capacidade de as gerações futuras satisfazerem suas próprias necessidades; primeiro você atende às necessidades essenciais dos pobres do mundo, essa é a prioridade absoluta.

    Devemos repensar nossas cidades enquanto uma fonte de produção capitalista, geralmente para as exportações. Será que o trabalho e as pessoas que vivem ali também não são considerados commodities, assim como a natureza?

    Diplomatique – Ouvimos na Rio+20 de Leonardo Boff que não é viável unir desenvolvimento e sustentabilidade. Precisamos separar esses conceitos e lidar com eles isoladamente. Você concorda com isso?

    Bond – Concordo, especialmente se considerarmos que o desenvolvimento seja o crescimento capitalista, baseado em altos níveis de consumo.

    Diplomatique – Levando em conta esse cenário, é possível pensar em cidades sustentáveis hoje?

    Bond – Bem, se pudermos reestruturar a cidade para ser não apenas um centro de lucro... O que precisamos considerar é que as cidades já se tornaram enormes favelas, especialmente as megacidades africanas, que não têm muita indústria e onde o proletariado é muito pequeno; esse precariado enorme teve apenas essas favelas terríveis para ocupar; temos um verdadeiro planeta das favelas. E esses são lugares horríveis, obviamente, que podem ser só parcialmente humanizados pelo ativismo social. Precisamos de maiores níveis de planejamento ambiental, informado por pessoas pobres e da classe trabalhadora e suas organizações.

    Agora temos alguns exemplos maravilhosos. Em Durban, minha cidade, a cidade com o maior número de pessoas HIV positivo no mundo, há dez anos os medicamentos custavam US$ 15 mil por ano, e poucos tinham acesso a eles. Hoje temos um planejamento medicinal que permite que 1,5 milhão de pessoas recebam os medicamentos gratuitamente. Com a propriedade intelectual afrouxada graças aos esforços do governo brasileiro e ao fornecimento de medicamentos genéricos, conquistamos esse direito. Os ativistas lutaram arduamente contra os Estados Unidos, a Organização Mundial do Comércio e as farmacêuticas. Fomos capazes de conseguir isso.

    Então é um momento excepcionalmente rico da história, começando com os brasileiros e seu movimento contra a ditadura, a CUT, e depois o PT e o MST e os movimentos sociais urbanos ajudando-nos a entender como avançar, assim como os zapatistas o fizeram, assim como fez o movimento de justiça global contra a Organização Mundial do Comércio, em Seattle, assim como nossos ativistas da aids na África do Sul.

    As elites não têm possibilidade de planejamento. Ideologicamente, estão entre neoliberalismo e neoconservadorismo. Quando o 1% falha, temos uma opção, que envolve o poder social e o poder autônomo, mas também exige o financiamento e o planejamento do governo e um relaxamento do poder corporativo. As corporações, obviamente, têm de ficar para trás, como fizeram com a crise da aids.

    Diplomatique – Você conhece algum lugar na Terra onde haja uma cidade sustentável?

    Bond – Não, as cidades sustentáveis vão ser a última conquista, porque é nas cidades que o capital tem seus bastiões nas fábricas, suas plataformas de exportação e seu poder político. Mas é também nelas que o combate intenso está acontecendo. Temos exemplos do transporte em Curitiba ou em Porto Alegre, dos orçamentos participativos, que nós admiramos. Mas criar uma aliança de pessoas pobres e trabalhadoras e, além disso, ter uma perspectiva ambiental é profundamente difícil.

    As cidades são a plataforma para o capitalismo mundial. Se quisermos um movimento urbano ecossocialista mundial, vamos ter de trabalhar muito. Mas os sinais de que isso pode ser feito se mostram em todos os lugares, especialmente nos grandes espaços públicos.

    Diplomatique – Quais sinais?

    Bond – Na Praça Tahrir, por exemplo, nos movimentos Ocupar, em toda a América do Norte e na Europa, que se desdobraram em debates sobre sustentabilidade. Seu primeiro objetivo é despertar as sociedades que estão dormindo ou sem poder, também chamadas quiescentes; não são sociedades ativas. Uma sociedade como os Estados Unidos não teve nenhuma experiência democrática. Seu Congresso é controlado e comprado pelas corporações. Então o que eu achei brilhante no ano passado foi 40% de uma sociedade reacionária ter despertado e apoiado o movimento Ocupar. Isso é maior do que o Tea Party e pode se traduzir, numa próxima fase de organização, em movimentos para tomar as cidades, tomar espaços nas cidades, invocando um verdadeiro direito à cidade.

    Diplomatique – Você está sugerindo que as cidades sustentáveis podem ser construídas nesse cenário maior de hoje?

    Bond – Sim, temos de construir e reconstruir as cidades. As forças mais avançadas, inclusive a Confederação Nacional de Trabalhadores Metalúrgicos da África do Sul, estão tentando entender como podemos mudar nossas cidades, em termos de sistemas de energia, de transporte, de produção ou sistemas agrícolas e alimentares. Nosso consumo, nosso descarte, nosso financiamento. Essas questões só podem ser respondidas quando houver mais trabalhadores ativos exigindo mais empregos nesses setores, como a eletricidade solar, e menos empregos nas usinas termelétricas de carvão. Ou em indústrias automobilísticas que apenas constroem carros de luxo, que é o problema sul-africano. Esses são os tipos de transição que, se os trabalhadores se unirem com a comunidade e os ambientalistas, podem ser aprofundados.

    O que eu queria dizer com o exemplo de Johannesburgo é que não tivemos essa unidade. Tivemos os verdes dizendo que querem salvar o meio ambiente, e os vermelhos, a justiça social, dizendo que querem o trabalho e a comunidade. É a fusão do verde e do vermelho que precisamos fazer.
    Nossas lutas para a sustentabilidade urbana na África do Sul, hoje, estão entre as mais altas taxas de protesto no mundo, um protesto constante, trinta ou quarenta por dia. Tais manifestações são em defesa da água, da eletricidade, dos serviços urbanos, como bens públicos. Eu sempre vejo a luta pela sustentabilidade do ambiente doméstico como uma parte central da possibilidade de tornar as cidades mais justas. Mas nosso problema é que a ideologia e a organização, a liderança e a coerência de um movimento não chegaram.

    Os exemplos que tivemos quando olhamos para a América Latina continuam a nos inspirar. Vocês construíram osmovimentos sociais com maior escopo, escala e visão estratégica, e de forma democrática. Vocês estão bem à frente de nós. Então vocês do Brasil também têm de ajudar a articular o caminho.

    É a visão de Henri Lefebvre e de David Harvey − orientador do meu doutorado −, que dizem que o direito à cidade é muito mais do que os serviços municipais individuais, a habitação a ser construída, a creche ou o espaço para mulheres no metrô no Rio. Essas são as coisas que cada movimento tem de exigir e ganhar, pouco a pouco. Mas o ponto crucial para eles é quando essas demandas, pequenas e incrementais, aumentam até o ponto em que o sistema capitalista diz: “Desculpe, mas não vamos aceitá-las”.

    É preciso o otimismo da vontade. Todas as revoluções no último século e meio vieram quando as exigências de baixo podiam ser realizadas, mas o bloco dominante não desiste, porque sente que, enquanto as demandas crescem, seu próprio poder de reproduzir a sociedade à sua imagem está ameaçado. Esse é nosso trabalho, é ameaçar esse poder. E eles estão muito fracos agora.

    A coisa em que eu mais acredito é que precisamos ligar os pontos entre os movimentos como estes daqui e os da minha cidade, Durban. Não apenas falar sobre as necessidades de nossa habitação, de água, nossas necessidades de saúde, mas ligar os pontos.

    A maior decepção no Brasil é com o Fórum Social Mundial, que deveria ser o lugar onde poderíamos fazer isso em escala mundial, mas ainda não encontrou a fórmula que nos permita dar um empurrão progressista e coerente no mundo. Por um momento eu pensei que seria possível: era fevereiro de 2003. Todos em Porto Alegre disseram que deveríamos acabar com a guerra de George W. Bush contra o Iraque. Tínhamos 15 milhões de pessoas se manifestando nas ruas em todo o mundo. Mas depois perdemos a visão do trabalho de uma unificação estratégica global. Agora eu acho que talvez estejamos recuperando isso, porque a justiça econômica e o direito à cidade, o direito à Praça Tahrir, o direito ao Parque Zuccotti em Nova York ou o direito à Catedral de St. Paul, na cidade de Londres, ou centenas de outros, são agora objeto de uma contestação fantástica. Estamos vencendo parcialmente nesses lugares.

    Mais do que nunca estamos tomando o espaço urbano, que tem tantas possibilidades. Mesmo durante um período em que o capitalismo urbano neoliberal esculpe e espia o espaço com as televisões de circuito fechado, policiando-o, ainda estamos fazendo incursões que eles têm dificuldades reais de controlar.

    Diplomatique – Você entende que já temos todas as soluções tecnológicas para resolver os problemas e precisamos da revolução política?
    Bond – Não podemos ir tão longe assim, porque os maiores avanços tecnológicos têm sido suprimidos. E esses são as energias renováveis e o transporte público. Foram reprimidos pela indústria de combustíveis fósseis com fins lucrativos e pela indústria automobilística com fins lucrativos. Precisamos voltar aos sistemas mais integrados e de base comunitária, nos quais as pessoas se conhecem e se amam, em vez de serem isoladas, atomistas; os trabalhadores competitivos se transformarem em uma colmeia.

    O elemento que falta quando falamos de justiça climática é a capacidade dos jovens de dizer às pessoas mais velhas: vocês realmente ficarão nos devendo essa dívida climática, porque vocês nos deixaram, como Gro Harlem Brundtland advertiu, um futuro insustentável. Vocês nos impediram de viver uma vida plena e decente, por ocuparem demais o espaço de carbono. Esses são os desafios maravilhosos que pedem e exigem de nós pensar grande e ligar os pontos, para integrar o social e o ecológico, e politicamente misturar o vermelho e o verde, para que tenhamos uma abordagem saudável e unificada.

    Quando se tem uma crise na qual o sistema financeiro obtém todo o dinheiro público para seu socorro, obviamente não vai haver muito mais dinheiro para mudar nossa energia, transporte, sistemas agrícolas e urbanos e sistemas de produção da maneira necessária. Assim, a luta contra os banqueiros parece estar presente na agenda de muitas pessoas.
    Meu grande medo é que o Brasil, como foi decidido na reunião do G20, faça parte do refinanciamento do FMI. Serão cerca de US$ 100 bilhões vindos dos Brics – a África do Sul acaba de colocar US$ 2 bilhões –, o que significa que estamos nos colocando contra os trabalhadores e os pobres da Grécia. E quanto mais precisarmos obter esse dinheiro de volta por meio do FMI, mais nossos Brics e nossos países de renda média se tornarão subimperialistas, fazendo o trabalho sujo e financiando as instituições imperialistas. Esse é o perigo.

    Isso significa aplanar as aparentes contradições, mas não alterar as relações de poder. Por exemplo, a lógica interna do controle imperial francês e norte-americano do Haiti ou do FMI não muda em nada. Quando você tem brasileiros que ajudam a articular isso, então é mais perigoso, porque, assim como os sul-africanos que entram nessas instituições, isso lhes dá a credibilidade que lhes falta. Portanto, temos um trabalho para os movimentos urbanos no Brasil: manter um olho no que o Brasil faz regional e globalmente. O mesmo vale para a África do Sul.

    Silvio Caccia Bava
    Diretor e editor-chefe do Le Monde Diplomatique Brasil



    2010 World Cup Links



    The CCS 2010 World Cup Page


    Peace Workshop, 4 October

    Date: 4 October 2012
    Venue: 6th Floor Howard College, MTB Building, Center for Civil Society, UKZN
    Time: 6pm

    All Civil Society organizations in Durban are invited to attend the peace workshop hosted by the Center for Civil Society to discuss the new peace charter as part of the South African Peace Network. You input is invaluable so please attend and spread through your network.


    Patrick Bond plenary address to Muslim Youth Movement 40th conference, 30 September

    Washington in Africa, 2012
    Who’ll get ‘whacked’ next, to hasten oil extraction and repel Chinese and Islamic threats?















    Patrick Bond debates KZN provincial planner, 25 September

    CENTER FOR NATURAL RESOURCE GOVERNANCE

    You are cordially invited to participate in a Natural Resource roundtable discussion to be held at the Zimbabwe Lawyers for Human Rights Boardroom 18 September 2012 at 1400hrs - 1630hrs.

    The discussion will focus on two case studies to deepen our understanding of the intricate issues related to natural resources governance, namely;

    a) A comparative analysis of the Marikana Massacre and Marange diamond-related human rights violations,
    b) The Resource Curse syndrome in Zimbabwe and South Africa.

    The key presentation shall be given by Professor Patrick Bond, the Director for the Centre for Civil Society at the University of KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa.

    Regards, Machinda Marongwe
    NANGO Programes Director


    Patrick Bond speaks on Resource-Cursed Southern Africa in Harare, 18 September

    CENTER FOR NATURAL RESOURCE GOVERNANCE

    You are cordially invited to participate in a Natural Resource roundtable discussion to be held at the Zimbabwe Lawyers for Human Rights Boardroom 18 September 2012 at 1400hrs - 1630hrs.

    The discussion will focus on two case studies to deepen our understanding of the intricate issues related to natural resources governance, namely;

    a) A comparative analysis of the Marikana Massacre and Marange diamond-related human rights violations,
    b) The Resource Curse syndrome in Zimbabwe and South Africa.

    The key presentation shall be given by Professor Patrick Bond, the Director for the Centre for Civil Society at the University of KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa.

    Regards, Machinda Marongwe
    NANGO Programes Director


    GreenSquad Alliance sponsors Nonviolence training, 21 September

    Nonviolent direct action training (Nvda), nonviolent communication (Nvc) training workshop and formation of SPP (Structured Peace Plan) for civil society organizations:

    You are invited to attend or send a representative of your organization to form a new peace network and SPP. Please see details below:

    Training to be conducted by Paaristha Oomadath, Nvda specialist.

    Brief Description:
    As the level of violence in our country escalates, it is up to civil society organizations to join forces and build on a peace framework on how we wish civil society to conduct actions in the future, pertaining to nonviolent demonstrations, efficient meetings and a structured plan of training where we can share and train in nonviolence. The purpose of this meeting is to form a peace network with proper tools for us to move forward in a more disciplined and nonviolent manner. I have over 10 years of experience conducting nonviolent direct action and am currently advocating nonviolent communication techniques. The workshops and meetings are free but I do encourage participants to donate whatever they can afford towards venue costs and travel expenses for trainers.

    Violence only insights violence, we can win nothing with hate. As Martin Luther King so brilliantly states: “Mankind must evolve for all human conflict a method which rejects revenge, aggression, and retaliation. The foundation of such a method is Love”

    If you are unable to attend but would still like to register your organization and offer input, please contact me on the details below.

    I look forward to welcoming you in becoming a part of this movement.

    Peace
    Paaristha Oomadath

    Date: Friday 21 September 2012
    Time: 14:00 – 16:30
    Venue: Centre for Civil Society, Memorial Tower Building,
    6th Floor, Howard College, UKZN

    Contact: 0790106703, oomadath79@gmail.com, greendelwyn@gmail.com

    Programme:

    14:00 Networking and registration
    14:30 Nonviolent Communication Training (NVC)
    15:00 Nonviolent Direct Action Training (NVDA)
    15:30 5 minute break
    15:35 Discussion on security/safety issues facing CSOs
    16:00 Input towards SPP
    16:30 End.


    Patrick Bond on MDGs, Redi Tlabi Radio 702 show, 25 September

    The Millennium Development Goals: Is South Africa on track?The 2012 Millennium Development Goals report warns that the 2015 deadline is fast approaching and in order to achieve outstanding goals, governments, the international community, civil society and the private sector need to intensify their contributions. According to our guest, Patrick Bond, director at the Centre for Civil Society at the University of KwaZulu-Natal says that South Africa is far away from meeting the deliverables of the of the Millennium Development Goals as there are no proper audit processes.
    www.702.co.za
    Media files 20120925BESTREDI.mp3



    Patrick Bond on detoxing South Durban at Umbilo community meeting, 12 September

    DURBAN PORT EXPANSION PROJECT UMBILO COMMUNITY MEETING


    EXPANDING PORT, POLLUTION & FREIGHT THREATENS SOUTH DURBAN –THIS INCLUDES RESIDENTS OF UMBILO / CONGELLA / GLENMORE / GLENWOOD / SEAVIEW & ROSSBURGH

    RESIDENTS, BUSINESS, COMMUNITY & FAITH LEADERS, & THE MEDIA, ARE INVITED TO JOIN:

    DES D’SA (South Durban Community Environmental Alliance)
    PROF PATRICK BOND (Director: UKZN Centre for Civil Society)
    ALICE THOMSON (Earthlife Africa)

    AT A STAKEHOLDERS MEETING ON: 18H30 WEDNESDAY 12 SEPTEMBER 2012 UMBILO CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH HALL 498 BARTLE ROAD, UMBILO

    THE ETHEKWINI MUNICIPALITY IS PORTRAYING THIS PROJECT
    AS THE SOLUTION TO ALL DURBAN’S ECONOMIC PROBLEMS –
    WE ARE ONLY BEING TOLD HALF THE TRUTH!

    STRESSED RESIDENTS WILL HAVE TO CONTEND WITH:
    • Having to service the development cost of this R250 billion project,
    • Higher rates to bring goods produced outside SA to destinations inland;
    • An increase in the number of containers handled by the port annually from 1.2 million to 20 million;
    • Which will mean over 8 x more trucks on our roads;
    • Over times more accidents in our suburbs;
    • Over 8 x the pollution in our air;
    • Over 8 x the noise & disturbance from heavy duty transport;
    • Over 8 x the likelihood of our health being affected by the increased proximity to industry & truck emissions;
    • The conversion of the Khangela Bridge & vicinity as the main harbour entrance & trucking route;
    • The conversion of residential areas & state land into logistics & office space
    (which will include the eThekwini FET College, open space areas, etc);
    • The rezoning of the area between Frere / Bartle Rds & Umbilo Rd for logistics & interface / office space;
    • The rezoning of the area between Umbilo & Sydney Rds for general industry;
    • An increase in crimes such as prostitution, illegal taverns, smuggling & the drug trade that results from proximity to a harbour.

    IS THIS WHAT WE WANT FOR OUR AREA & THE FUTURE OF DURBAN?

    For more information & to join other community groups challenging this development:

    CONTACT THE CAMPAIGN AGAINST SOUTH DURBAN PORT EXPANSION:
    SDCEA: Des D’Sa - 083 982 6939 - 031 468 1257 - desmond@sdceango.co.za
    EARTHLIFE AFRICA: Alice Thomson – 031 465 9038 - alicetho@ispace.co.za /
    Vanessa Black- 082 472 8844 - black@ispace.co.za
    UAG: Vanessa Burger – 082 847 7766 – umbiloactiongroup@gmail.com

    Patrick Bond briefs OECD-Watch on Marikana and the SA Resource Curse, 11 September


    Program OECD Watch General Assembly September 2012

    Venue: Johannesburg, South Africa
    Dates: 11-14 September



    Click on image to enlarge



    Patrick Bond at the Lost in Transformation book launch seminar, 6 September



    Sampie Terreblanche’s new book begs for change
    Patrick Bond (Eye on Civil Society) 28 August 2012

    Could Lonmin have paid its workers more, after a decade of prosperity, to avoid sinking South Africa into one of the worst calamities in corporate history?

    Though a bit lower today, platinum prices had soared 300 percent from early 2000s levels; loosened exchange controls let profits flow to London headquarters; Ernst & Young rated ‘sustainable development’ at Lonmin ‘excellent’ and the World Bank made a $150 million commitment to support the firm’s gender, AIDS and community investment at Marikana – both vital mine-wash in the event that embarrassing research on exploitation caught the attention of journalists or campaigners.

    The local police were apparently in Lonmin’s pocket; its ‘sweetheart union’ kept workers in check; former worker-leader Cyril Ramaphosa was on its board; and a quarter of its labour force was outsourced. In spite of a Congress of SA Trade Unions demand to eradicate labour brokers, the president’s son Duduzane and the Gupta family friends run a large company supplying the platinum industry with cheap workers, so no change was feared there.

    As for mining nationalization campaigning by the ANC Youth League, Julius Malema was driven out – in part by Ramaphosa – and the Chamber of Mines neutralized the threat when it ‘supported the ANC research work intellectually and financially and privately lobbied a number of the key stakeholders,’ as chief executive Bheki Sibiya acknowledged.

    In this cozy context, impatient greed resulted in a slaughter of its workers – who were not even on the company’s property – and then with classic insensitivity, Lonwin issued a ‘back to work or be fired’ order just as mourning began.

    But the damage goes back far beyond this nightmare fortnight. To learn why Marikana is not just an aberration of South Africa’s ‘Minerals-Energy Complex’ (MEC), read Stellenbosch economics professor emeritus Sampie Terreblanche’s brand new book, Lost in Transformation.

    In fewer than 150 pages, the former Broederbond insider unveils why the African National Congress embraced policies that made the lower half of the society much poorer: ‘There can be little doubt that the secret negotiations between the MEC and a leadership core of the ANC were mainly responsible for the ideological somersault of the ANC.’

    Finally, says Terreblanche, ‘the MEC was satisfied that the ANC was boxed in sufficiently on economic issues in the secret negotiations, and so informed the National Party on 26 September 1992 that it could accept the sunset clauses’ that Joe Slovo offered to cement the elite transition.

    As further evidence of capitulation to the MEC, Pik Botha was offered the mining ministry from 1994-99, followed by corporate lawyer Penuell Maduna – who then became the main local opponent of black South Africans’ reparations lawsuits in the US courts.

    Says Terreblanche, ‘As the MEC was almost uninterruptedly in cahoots with white governments before 1994, there are indications that it and other corporations are again too closely in cahoots with the ANC government.’ That damage includes ‘South Africa's position as a neocolonial satellite of the American-led neoliberal empire since 1994’.

    Is relief on the way? Not from the Finance Ministry, for while Pravin Gordhan’s ‘huge increase in infrastructure investment that was announced in the March 2012 budget is long overdue,’ remarks Terreblanche, it will ‘be spent on infrastructural projects that would facilitate the export of minerals’ – thus amplifying social and ecological crises – rather than durable projects to end poverty, unemployment and inequality.

    Moreover, he alleges, Trevor Manuel’s National Development Plan is ‘superficial and naïve. Why has the Commission not concentrated on the unequal power relations, the unequal property relations and the unequal opportunities that are making the new South Africa society a very unjust society’ … along with the ‘power shifts that took place during the transformation process which aggravated social injustice in South Africa?’

    With its ‘fairy-tale targets’, the Plan ‘is actually a carefully crafted ideological propaganda document’ whose purpose ‘is to lull the general public, and especially the impoverished majority, into contentment.’ Thanks to Manuel’s ‘wishful thinking’, says Terreblanche, ‘the plight of the poor and the unemployed will remain unresolved – and could become even more severe.’

    Resistance will have to stiffen outside the ruling party. Even if Cosatu failed members and society this month, Terreblanche recalls, ‘Churches played a strategic role in the struggle against apartheid. Why are the churches not conducting an open war on behalf of those that are undeservedly poor and against those that are undeservedly rich?’ In the nick of time, the Bench Marks Foundation led by Bishop Joe Seoka became a bastion of reason, as Lonmin and its allies began covering up the deep-seated Marikana misdeeds.

    I regained optimism after reading this powerful book, because with a voice of Terreblanche’s experience and intolerance for injustice, with renewed awareness about how the MEC corrupts our economy and environment, with sustained outrage at corruption, with revulsion at widespread police brutality, and with growing solidarity for the victims of the Marikana Massacre, surely there must now be a way to undo our liberation party’s world-historic sell-out?



    Terreblanche tackles crony capitalism – but is ‘social democracy’ the solution?
    Review of Lost in Transformation for Amandla!
    Patrick Bond

    Sampie Terreblanche’s brief (150pp) new book Lost in Transformation adds to our understanding of the ‘Americanisation’ of South Africa’s economy, and forces new questions about a future, necessary transition to socialism.

    Though the eloquent 79 year old is an absolutely invaluable ally to SA’s independent left, that’s not what Terreblanche wants, is it – he’s a ‘social-democratic capitalist’ (he declares). His heart is apparently broken: in spite of a few welfarist gestures and corporatist-oriented labour laws, the African National Congress elite made policy and alliance choices that strengthened the Minerals-Energy Complex (MEC), introduced financialisation and allowed capital flight, hastened deindustrialization, and amplified poverty, unemployment and inequality.

    Together, these ‘introduce almost unbearable tensions into the viability of our democratic system,’ he argues. True, and the book was published at exactly the same time as the Marikana massacre. But can those tensions and social forces now mobilizing, be marshaled into structural changes? To arrive at an answer may require a different analysis.

    But we can go a long way with Terreblanche’s book, because there are two special talents he brings, aside from a fluid writing style. The book feels like a down-to-earth lecture to his Stellenbosch economics students, an antidote to all the orthodox arguments they imbibe. The first talent is his sweeping view of long waves of accumulation. The second is his insider perspective on our transition from racial to class apartheid.

    His periodisation of SA political-economic history emphasizes the leading political power blocs and their accumulation strategy: the Dutch East India Company rule until 1795, British colonialism until 1910, the MEC prior to 1948, and the MEC after 1948. The latter era witnessed the emergence of verligte (enlightened) Afrikaners, in part through changing self-interests. Terreblanche observes, ‘When one of the major Johannesburg mining houses, the General Mining and Finance Corporation [Gencor], got into difficulties in 1964, Oppenheimer's Anglo-American took it over and offered it to Sanlam’ to win friends in Pretoria.

    (In a blazing conflict of interest, Gencor was later allowed to escape SA by Finance Minister Derek Keys, purchase Shell’s Billiton, and merge with Australian-based BHP – and is now the world’s largest mining house, responsible for SA’s energy crisis thanks to its guzzling Richards Bay aluminium smelters which receive the world’s cheapest electricity, as just one durable residue of this verligte economic agenda.)

    While verkramptes in the civil service, agriculture and labour-intensive businesses opposed reform, says Terreblanche, ‘From the mid-1960s there was growing cooperation between the emerging Afrikaner corporate sector and the established English business sector under the leadership of the MEC. In the 1980s the white business sector co-opted the National Party in its desperate attempts to solve its accumulation crisis.’

    That means, he argues, ‘As the accumulation crisis deepened, the effective government shifted towards the MEC, which orchestrated the transformation process from 1986 onwards.’ But Terreblanche helped birth transformation too, alongside a few other Afrikaner intellectuals, launching ‘talks-about-talks’ from 1987-89. At that point Sanlam insurance company executives kicked him off the verligte team because of his redistributive orientation.

    Why 1986 as the break-point for apartheid? Terreblanche notes four geopolitical conjuctures: the Chernobyl nuclear power plant disaster unveiled Soviet incompetence and thus hastened the end of the Cold War; PW Botha’s comprehensive state of emergency; US Congressional anti-apartheid sanctions; and the Reagan/Gorbachev summit in Iceland. Recalls Terreblanche, Gorbachev then ‘put pressure on the ANC in exile to seek a negotiated settlement.’

    Another critical moment was after Botha’s stroke in mid-1989 when Margaret Thatcher arm-twisted FW de Klerk to release Nelson Mandela and unban liberation movements. De Klerk kept the lid on the pressure cooker during the country’s longest-ever depression, from 1989-93, by more than doubling the budget deficit, which Terreblanche terms ‘reckless white plundering in the final years of white supremacy.’

    This was the period of rapidly-declining East Bloc power and Ronald Reagan’s reassertion of Washington’s imperial project, resulting in our ‘lost transformation’, says Terreblanche: ‘The Americanisation of the SA politico-economic system during the transformation of 1994-96 was based on the wrong ideological premises, on the wrong power structures, and put SA on the wrong development path… integrated into the criminalised global structures.’

    What, though, about social-democratic aspirations of the ANC government as reflected in the Constitution? ‘It is sad that the realisation of these important social and economic rights has been made dependent on the judgment of technocratically-orientated ministers of finance,’ Terreblanche rebuts.

    As for the government’s expansion of apartheid-era child grants and pensions (though at lower payment levels than non-Africans got prior to 1994): ‘The fact that about 14 million people receive grants from the government is most laudable for without these grants their poverty would have been unbearable.’

    ‘Most laudable’? Or is this better described, simply, as deracialisation of the inherited system – as in so many other ways the transformation represents continuities not change. In any case, the fiscal cost of greater social spending since 1994 as a percentage of GDP has only been around 4 percent, hardly a welfare state in the making.

    Genuine change would cost more, and to his credit, Terreblanche has always argued for a wealth tax, along with reparations to be paid by foreign companies that profited from apartheid. But he refuses to tackle the ownership of the means of production – a shame, given how quickly the word ‘nationalisation’ got back into mainstream discussions after the ANC Youth League’s recent campaign. But no mention here, much less the rigorous discussion we hunger for.

    As do most social democrats, Terreblanche offers a moral critique of ‘the conspicuous consumption, the wastefulness, the greediness’ by both elite whites and a few blacks: ‘judged against the misery and deprivation of so many poor people, we have no alternative but to be shocked at the vulgarity and the repulsiveness of the lifestyle of the rich.’

    But a Marxist critique would go much deeper. [1] For Terreblanche, ‘The economic problems experienced by the US from 1968 until the early 1980s could be regarded as the result of imperial overstretch, as the country's commitment to public expenditure became so great that it had an impact on the continued productive vigour of the private sector.’

    No, the Marxist position is the opposite: declining rates of profit and stagnation (and declining competitiveness) in the private productive sector – an ‘overaccumulation crisis’ – underlie the broader processes of globalization (i.e. intensified imperialism), renewed class war and neoliberal public policies.

    By citing Giovanni Arrighi, Jim Blaut, Ferdinand Braudel and David Harvey on global trends, and drawing on Samantha Ashman, Ben Fine and Dan O'Meara for local economic critique, Terreblanche is certainly not unfamiliar with Marxist analysis. But his next great work, a world-historical survey of inequality, should more explicitly grapple with Kapital’s crisis theory, instead of leaving it entirely alone.

    Still, the critique of SA capitalism is otherwise sound, the moral outrage is uplifting, and the timing could not be better, to remind SA’s 1% that Sampie Terreblanche has again unveiled how and why they got lost in transformation.


    The Youth Wage Subsidy and its alternatives, 5 - 6 September



    The Youth Wage Subsidy and its alternatives – 5th and 6th of September in PE

    Wednesday 5th of September

    10:00 - 10:30 Welcome
    Cde Andile Bloko, secretary of Cosatu local and Cde Tony Hercules from AIDC

    10:30 – 11:00 The struggle for decent work and a living wage for all.
    Cde Thobile Ntola, President of SADTU, gives a key note address

    11:00 – 13:00 The scope, nature and effects of unemployment:
    Zunaid Moolla on The scale of unemployment and how it has developed since 1994;
    Nomvula Hadi (SAMU) on Women and unemployment;
    Simphiwe Dada (TCOE) on The scale and nature of unemployment in the rural areas
    Enver Motala on Training, education and unemployment;

    Last half hour discussion and problematizing preferably take place in groups

    13:00 – 14:00 L U N C H

    14:00 – 15:00 The scope, nature and effects of unemployment, continued …
    Five minute reports from group discussions, with questions to the four panellists.

    15:00 – 15:40 The Youth Wage Subsidy proposal
    Niall Reddy: What is the YWS and why is it met with such criticism?

    15:45 – 17:00 Zunaid Moolla leads discussion in plenary on the YWS.

    17:00 – 17:30 TEA BREAK

    19:00 DINNER

    Thursday 6th of September

    9:00 – 9:30 Recapitulation from Wednesday, Cde Andile Bloko and Tony Hercules

    9:30 – 11:00: Alternative economic strategies
    Patrick Bond, UKZN on Alternative economic policy and the full employment perspective
    Kholeka Mooi-Mhlana (PE, Environmental Dept.) on Land reform, land use and employment:

    11:00 – 11:30 Tea break

    11:30 – 13:00 Jane Barret (Cosatu) on The Cosatu national minimum wage proposal and unemployment
    Dick Forslund (AIDC) on Wage-led and sustainable development and the role of public sector jobs:

    13:00 – 14:00 L U N C H

    14:00 – 15:15 Organising fight for employment; the problem of unity unemployed and employed
    Cde Mazotsho Dukhwe, chairperson of Cosatu PE;
    Presenter from UPM and other social movements (to be confirmed)

    15:15 – 15:30 Unemployment and the economic freedom campaign:
    Reserved for ANCYL representative (to be confirmed).

    15:30 – 15:45 The two chairs, Cdes Andile Bloko and Tony Hercules from AIDC ends the seminar.


    Patrick Bond debates Pravin Gordhan on South Durban's port expansion, Clairwood, 1 September





    Clairwood Conference : “Building The Future Now”


    Date:: Saturday, 1st September 2012
    Venue: Clairwood Tamil Institute

    Programme
    08.30 Tea / Registration
    9.30 Prayer - Mr. Paddy Kearney
    9.40 Welcome –Chairman Clairwood Ratepayers & Residents Association - Rishi Singh
    9.45 Official Welcome – His Worship Mayor of Ethekweni Councilor James Nxumalo
    10.00 (Speaker 1 ) Prof Dianne Scott – UKZN: Social Considerations in Planning
    10.45 ( Speaker 2 ) Mr. Bobby Peak - Ground Work: Environmental Perspective & Concerns
    11.15 Tea Break
    11.30 Keynote Address Honorable Minister of Finance: Mr. Pravin Gordhan
    12.00 (Speaker 3 ) Prof Patrick Bond – UKZN ( Centre of Civil Society ) : A perspective for Redevelopment of Clairwood
    12.30 ( Speaker 4 ) Prof Ashwin Desai – University Johannesburg : A Historical overview of Clairwood and its present status.
    13.00 Lunch
    13.45 Way Forward – Advocate Roland Parsotham
    14.00 Vote of Thanks - Mervyn Reddy ( Hon. Secretary – CRRA )
    14.30 Close of Conference

    CONFERENCE FACILITATOR : ADVOCATE ROLAND PARSOTHAM

    Programme subject to changes







    Patrick Bond on SA transition at Arab Spring conference, Pretoria, 30 August


    MENA: a transforming region and its impact on the African continent 27–29 August 2012

    MENA uprisings conference programme

    Monday
    19:00 Reception dinner
    Welcome – Na’eem Jeenah
    Conference Opening Session: Heralding the dawn of a new era
    Deputy Minister Ebrahim Ebrahim
    Keynote address – Wadah Khanfar

    Tuesday
    09:00 Transitions and transformations
    Chair: Shireen Ally
    Comparing models of revolution, transition and democratisation – Houchang Chehabi
    Long road from revolution to democracy: Challenges and threats facing transitionary states – Garth le Pere
    The question and the struggle: Comparisons across regions and time – Shamil Jeppie
    Respondent: Shireen Hassim

    10:45 Tea

    11:00 A new year, a new region and new democracies
    Chair: Mohammed Dangor
    Not out of the blue: A historical appraisal of resistance and people’s movements in MENA and possibilities for the emergence of indigenous democratic models – Larbi Sadiki
    In revolt: uprisings that will reshape the region and the world – Juan Cole
    The foreign hand: roles and interventions of external actors – Phyllis Bennis
    Respondent: Steven Friedman

    12:45 Lunch

    13:30 Unfinished business?
    Chair: Ronnie Kasrils
    How Syria has come to this and the current state of play – Fawaz Tello
    Where is Syria headed? – Najib Ghadbian
    Will the Bahrain uprising reach a conclusion? – Maryam al-Khawaja
    Implications of regime collapse in Syria and regime preservation in Bahrain
    Respondent: Jonathan Whittall

    15:30 Tea

    15:45 A transforming MENA region
    Chair: Khadija Patel
    Who will be the new regional hegemons – Taha Ozhan
    Can the Palestinian-Israeli issue remain unchanged after the uprisings? – Mohsen Saleh, Yossi Shain
    Arab monarchies: Is the charge of ‘counter-revolutionary’ valid? – Abdullah Alberaidi
    Transitional justice and reconciliation in North Africa – Yasmin Sooka
    Respondent: Noor Nieftagodien

    Wednesday
    09:00 Islamists ‘above ground’ and poised to lead
    Chair: Zeenat Adam
    An Egyptian Ikhwanul Muslimoon perspective – Essam el-Erian
    An Ennahda perspective from Tunisia – Said Ferjani
    A Libyan Islamist perspective – Ashur Shamis
    The uprisings within a broader Islamist re-awakening – Muhammad M. Shinqiti

    10:45 Tea

    11:00 Post-revolt North Africa and its role on the African continent
    Chair: Fadl Nacerodien
    Potential for a coordinated North African bloc – Said Ferjani
    Algeria: the odd one out – Yahia Zoubir
    Do the uprisings offer the possibility of greater Arab-African cooperation? – Salah Elzein
    After Gaddafi and Mubarak: A new North African role in the AU – Francis Ikome
    Respondent: Sanusha Naidu

    13:00 Lunch

    14:00 Experiences from the South African transition
    Chair: Lebohang Pheko
    Challenges of transforming from liberation movement to government
    Transitional justice: Of truth and reconciliation – John Daniel
    Economic transition: balancing the markets with the needs of the poor – Mzukizi Qobo
    Crafting a democratic constitution
    Respondent: Patrick Bond

    16:00 Tea

    16:30 Closing Session:
    Chair: Heidi-Jane Esakov
    Wadah Khanfar
    Na’eem Jeenah


    Patrick Bond paper on environmental and social rights at Christian Michelsen Institute workshop, Norway, 27 August

    Patrick Bond, Water rights, climate, ‘environmental services’ and post-neoliberal strategy from Johannesburg to Rio+20: A critique of liberal NGO and neoliberal Green Economy narratives
    Paper presented to the Workshop on Climate Change Discourses, Rights and the Poor, Christian Michelsen Institute, Norway, 26 August


    CONFERENCE PROGRAMME


    Molefi Ndlovu on Qwasha! Durban street narratives about COP17, Christian Michelsen Institute, Norway, 26 August

    CONFERENCE PROGRAMME




    Enviromental Teach-In, 25 August



    In preparation for the Sustainable Living Exhibition
    EARTHLIFE ETHEKWINI, GREEN SQUAD ALLIANCE & 350.ORG DURBAN

    Will be holding an informative workshop on key environmental issues for all SLE volunteers and anyone who may be interested in finding out more and becoming involved.
    All welcome!


    Date: Saturday, 25 August 2012
    Venue:Centre for Civil Society, 6th Floor Memorial Building UKZN
    Time: 11h00 - 14h00
    RSVP: For catering purposes, please confirm attendance by 23 August
    Contact: Delwyn Pillay (ELA publicity & education officer)
    071 621 8305 / greendelwyn@gmail.com

    PROGRAMME
    11h00 Introduction to 350.org
    12h30 BREAK
    11h15 Introduction to Green Squad Alliance
    12h45 Climate Change
    11h30 Introduction to Earthlife Africa
    13h15 Public Transport
    11h50 Questions
    13h30 Back of Port
    12h00 GMOs
    14h00 CLOSE




    CCS brainstorm on Marikana Massacre, 21 August




    Patrick Bond lecture on White Elephants to S.Durban Community Environmental Alliance at Austerville Community Centre, 21 August




    CCS celebrates Brutus legacy at From Roots to Fruits non-violence conference, 1 August



    Roots to Fruits: Nonviolence in Action Conference programme, 31st July 2012

    18:00 Paddy Kearney, Board member, Gandhi Development Trust
    18.15 Cllr James Nxumalo, Mayor, eThekwin Metro
    18.30 Dr Bernard Lafayette, Director, Center for Nonviolence and Peace Studies
    18: 45 Professor Ahmed Bawa, Vice-Chancellor of Durban University of Technology
    19:00 Dr Zweli Mkhize, Premier, Province of KwaZulu-Natal

    Dinner

    1st August



    18:00 Dinner

    2nd August



    18:00 Gala dinner


    Patrick Bond lecture on African political economy to Institute for the Advancement of Journalism, Johannesburg, 26 July



    Cell phone penetration: Africa still lags behind
    Posted on 07 August 2012 by Amat JENG

    Journalists gathered last week in the South African city of Johannesburg for an ‘Economic and Financial Reporting course’ were taken to task to dig into issues of economic viability, such as the ones that have caused the development of the continent to stagnate.

    Guest speaker Professor Patrick Bond, director of the Centre for Civil Society at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, gave a brilliant expose on the theme: “Is Africa prospering or being looted?”

    For him, Africa continues to lag behind other regions both in terms of the percentage of people with access to the “full range of communications services and the amounts and manner in which they can be used – primarily as a result of the high cost of services”.

    “Large numbers of citizens across the continent still lack access to or cannot afford the kind of communications services that enable effective social and economic participation in a modern economy and society,” he said.

    Despite a steady progress in mobile market growth, Professor Bond observes that there are still some bottlenecks that need careful consideration, especially when making policies that would impact the sector.

    He pointed out some of the actual performances of the industry that unveil telling weaknesses. Although the mobile market has experienced significant growth, outcomes have been sub-optimal in many respects, he notes, saying these include the role of multinational capital in sucking out profits and dividends; the lack of genuine competition (collusion is notorious even in the large economies as South Africa); relatively high prices for cell-phone handsets and services; and limited technological linkages to internet service.

    Last year, a report (“Towards Evidence-based ICT Policy and Regulation”) by Johannesburg researchers Enrico Calandro, Alison Gillwald, Mpho Moyo and Christopher Stork unveiled a host of ICT deficiencies, arguing that “cell-phones penetration figures tend to mask the fact that millions of Africans still do not own their own means of communication”.

    Through this academic work, Professor Bond observed that the reasons the continent is lagging behind on this sector could primarily be blamed on the results of high cost of services: the cost of wholesale telecommunications services as an input for other economic activities remains high, escalating the cost of business in most countries; the contribution of ICT to gross domestic product, with some exceptions, is considerably less than global averages; and national objectives of achieving universal and affordable access to the full range of communications services have been undermined either by poor policies.

    “As a general trend across the continent, while the voice divide is decreasing, the Internet divide is increasing and broadband is almost absent on the continent and the fixed-line sector continues to show no signs of recovery as most countries experienced negative growth between 2006 and 2008,” he said.

    “Africa is suffering from neo-colonialism, and that means the basic trend of exporting raw materials, and cash crops, minerals, petroleum, has gotten worse.”

    For Professor Bond, the neo-colonialism syndrome has left many Africans staggering in destitute and poverty, saying “[neo-colonialism] has really left Africa poorer per person in much of the continent, than even at independence.”

    The scholar academically argued that World Bank’s Chief Economist for Africa Region Shanta Devarajan’s abstract that the continent’s “GDP per capita is not lower today than it was ten to fifteen years ago”, is misleading.

    “The idea that there’s steady growth in Africa is very misleading, and it really represents the abuse of economic concepts by politicians, by economists, who factor out society and the environment,” he added.
    Source: http://www.mediarevolution-amat.blogspot.com/
    africabusiness.com



    Ewok does Durban (with a French connection), 25 July




    More


    Jim Kilgore meets Zimbabweans in central Durban, 23 July

    Join Durban's Zimbabwean community at Mandebvu in Central Durban, 28 Louise Lane (near Carlisle and Yusuf Dadoo Sts)
    for more information contact Patrick at 083 425 1401 or China at 072 651 9790



    We Are All Zimbabweans Now



    In 1981 a young American historian arrives in Zimbabwe, full of idealism and enthusiasm for the benevolent new Prime Minister Robert Mugabe and the post-colonial new beginning for that country. His historic research leads him to an apparent murder case, unresolved since the days of the bush war. As he draws - or is lead - or yet mislead - closer to an answer, he becomes involved with a local woman through whom he soon finds himself in the inner circle of the new ruling class. Once the euphoria starts dissipating he encounters increasingly menacing instances of corruption and repression, including threats to himself to abandon his investigation. With every new revelation a new layer of decay is exposed and with that, his idealism retreats. In the process, the meaning of the novel's title, taken from Mugabe's conciliatory rhetoric at the beginning, gradually comes to mean: we are all trapped and compromised into the moral tangle and the destruction into which all the promise has degenerated. James Kilgore's debut is an extremely accomplished and compelling novel that deftly employs the instruments of a detective thriller.



    James Kilgore was a fugitive from the US for 27 years, based in Zimbabwe and South Africa for much of that time. He lived under the alias Dr John Pape and became a respected academic at the University of Cape Town and the International Labour Research and Information Group (Ilrig). In 2002 he was arrested and US authorities extradited him to California where he served six and a half years in prison for his political activities in the 1970s. During his incarceration he wrote several novels, three of which (including Freedom Never Rests) have been published since his release in 2009. He is presently a research scholar at the Center for African Studies at the University of Illinois.

    BOOK REVIEW: We Are All Zimbabweans Now
    James Kilgore Umuzi

    A RADICAL activist in the late sixties and early seventies with links to the Symbion¬ese Liberation Army (SLA), American-born James Kilgore was indicted for possession of explosives in 1975 but managed to elude the law for 27 years, hiding out in Zimbabwe, Australia and South Africa. ¬Living in Cape Town under the ¬assumed name of Dr John Pape he became a respected academic but was finally arrested in 2002 and ¬extradited to California where he served six-and-a-half years in ¬prison.

    While incarcerated he wrote his first novel, We Are All Zimbabweans Now, a book which takes its title from a speech made by President Robert Mugabe.

    An intriguing blend of fact and ¬fiction, its central character, Ben Dabney, is an idealistic young American doctoral student who, hugely ¬impressed by Mugabe’s seeming magnanimity at the time of independence, decides he wants to write the definitive history of Zimbabwe’s struggle for liberation and reconciliation. By his reckoning Mugabe will emerge as the hero of the book.

    Arriving in Harare, Dabney ingratiates himself with various members of the new ruling elite as well as forming a romantic attachment with a former female combatant. In the course of his research Dabney hears about the mysterious death of Elias Tichasara (obviously based, in part, on Josiah Tongarara, the popular head of Zanu’s military wing, Zanla, who died in similarly strange circumstances in a car crash on the eve of independence) and decides to try and uncover what really happened.

    As his investigations lead him across the country Dabney starts to find things under stones he wished he had not turned and is eventually faced with the realisation that the man he had seen as the great hope of post-independent Africa was not the benign force for change he had believed him to be. He also discovers that his activities have attracted the interest of the authorities.

    Kilgore writes well, the plainness of his style concealing a considerable artistry of pace and construction. In a sense, though, Kilgore lets Mugabe off relatively easy, the book ending long before his more recent excesses — the stolen elections, Operation Clean Up The Filth in which 700 000 people had their homes demolished, the ¬destruction of the country’s agricultural and mining sectors (and the Zimbabwe dollar), the endemic ¬corruption and cronyism, as well as the old despot’s continuing efforts to thwart meaningful reform.
    Anthony Stidolph

    PHOTOS









    RIO+20: THE FUTURE WE WANTED?, 17 July





    You are cordially invited to a "Rio+20 report back
    Date: 17 July
    Time: 5.30pm for 6.00pm - 8.00pm
    Venue: Mirriam Cele Room, Diakonia Centre
    Speakers:
  • Nawaal Domingo (Research officer, SDCEA)

  • Patrick Bond (Director, Centre for Civil Society)

  • Bobby Peek (Director, groundwork)


  • RSVP: Busi at 031 310 3500 or reception@diakonia.org.za by 13 July.
    (Please indicate whether you would require parking when you RSVP)

    Secure parking is available on the 1st floor of the Renaissance Building, next door to the service entrance of the Diakonia Centre
    in Maud Mfusi Street (St George’s Street).

    Please feel free to advertise this event on your notice board and in your newsletters with the RSVP details clearly shown.

    Your assistance in promoting this event is greatly appreciated.

    Kudzai Taruona
    COMMUNICATIONS COORDINATOR
    DIAKONIA COUNCIL OF CHURCHES
    Phone: +27 31 310 3500 (Switchboard)
    +27 31 310 3551 (Direct)
    +27 31 310 3502 (Fax)
    +27 74 970 7882 (Mobile)

    Please visit us at www.diakonia.org.za

    36 Years of working for a transformed society


    The Rio+20 conference on Sustainable Development ended with the formal adoption of a 50 page document entitled ‘The future we want,’ which gives a thorough overview of the varied and urgent challenges the global community faces.

    It is unequivocal on poverty, environmental degradation and climate change. But, much of this text is a restatement of what we have heard before, a compendium of past promises.

    Does the document have the requisite framework for action, and were the means of implementation

    Targets, goals and money - also agreed on to get the future we need?

    Does the text set humanity on a new course that offers a vision for a new world?

    As the negotiators left Rio, will the world be any different?

    Will their agreement lead to sustainable development and poverty eradication?



    Patrick Bond on climate justice at Johannesburg Workshop in Theory and Criticism, 5 July






    2012 Session - July 1-10, 2012,
    University of the Witwatersrand
    Futures of Nature
    Venue is WISER Seminar Room unless otherwise indicated

    CONFERENCE PROGRAMME


    Click on image to enlarge


    Fidelis Allen at African politics conference, Dakar, 26 - 28 June

    Between prospective radical social movements and excesses of political elites in Africa : explaining the dialectics in an era of alternative development

    CONFERENCE PROGRAMME

    Click on image to enlarge

    Fidelis Allen, Ph.D[1]

    Abstract
    Africa has for too long been on the margins when it comes to development. Not only have majority of its countries' citizens experienced increasing poverty, their 'natural franchise' to survive and contribute meaningfully to social change have been hindered or outrightly stolen by visionless and corrupt political elite through manipulation of the political process and abuse of human rights. Worse, they have accepted without question western models of development based on capitalist economics and politics. These are severe backwardness with definite social change overtones. The results of which inequality and destruction of ecosystems are most prominent might in the coming years be the basis of designing alternative models of development in which the downtrodden classes will be the object of politics and organization of production. And will be the ground for which any development model imposed by market oriented political elites will be rejected and overturned through collective action. This implies movement into seasons of intolerance for corruption, rule of capital, inequality, poverty, 'climate capitalism, dictatorship and exploitative economic and social systems. This paper discusses these processes in context of dialectics of an emerging radical social movement in some parts of Africa and excesses of political elites.

    Key words: social movements. Africa. Development. Dialectics. Elites. Excesses.

    [1] Fidelis is currently in the School of Built Environment and Development Studies' Centre for Civil Society, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Howard College Campus, Durban. He is also Senior Lecturer in the Department of Political and Administrative Studies, University of Port Harcourt, Choba, Nigeria. E-mail: allfidelis@gmail.com


    Patrick Bond on SA subimperialism and resistance, Rio+20 Intercoll.net seminar, 21 June



    Patrick Bond at the Rio+20 Cupula dos Povos plenary, 18 June

    Patrick Bond on social and environmental justice strategies, Rio+20 Cupula dos Povos plenary, 18 June

    Bond joined Archbishop Mbilingi from Angola, the chair from panel sponsor Coopération Internationale pour le Développement et la Solidarité (CIDSE), French intellectual Geneviève Azam, the legendary Liberation Theology founder Leonardo Boff, and the former Bolivian ambassador to the United Nations Pablo Solon.

    PHOTOS





    CCS at the International Society for Ecological Economics conference, 17 June



    Patrick Bond, Khadija Sharife and Baruti Amisi on African CDMs at the International Society for Ecological Economics, Rio de Janeiro, 17 June

    CONFERENCE PROGRAMME





    Click on image to enlarge


    Kim Min-Jung speaks on climate activism and the COP17, 15 June



    Globalization and Changes in Accumulation System and Class Structure: International Comparative Approaches
    2012 International Conference

    Date: June 15, 2012 (Friday)
    Time: 9:30 AM - 6:00 PM
    Place: Multimedia Room, Social Sciences Bldg. 3rd Fl. Gyeongsang National University, Jinju



    Photos




    Programme

    Registration 9:30 -- 10:00

    Opening Remarks 10:00 - 10:10
    Jeong Seong-jin (Director, ISS)

    Session 1 : Global Crisis and Struggle
    Presider: Jeong Jin-sang (Gyeongsang National University, Korea)

    10:10-11:25 1. Chang Dea-oup (University of London, UK)
    Challenge of Mobile Value-Subjects: East Asian capitalism, migrant labour and citizenship from below
    Discussant : Jang Gui-yeon (Gyeongsang National University, Korea)

    11:25-12:40 2. Patrick Bond & Kim Min-Jung (University Of Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa) Climate activism quandaries: Eco-socialist responses to Durban’s COP17
    Discussant : Jang Sang-hwan (Gyeongsang National University, Korea)

    Lunch 12:30 - 14:00

    Session 2 : Globalization and Changes in Accumulation System
    Presider : Jeong Seong-jin (Gyeongsang National University, Korea)

    14:00-15:15 3. Martin Hart-Landsberg (Lewis and Clark College, USA) Capitalist Globalization and it's Consequences
    Discussant : Lee Jeong-koo (Gyeongsang National University, Korea)

    15:15-16:30 4. Andrew Kliman (Pace University, USA) The Falling Profitability of U.S. Multinational Corporations Abroad : Implications for an Understanding of Global Profitability and the Great Recession
    Discussant: Chang Si-bok (Mokpo National University, Korea)

    Break 16:30-16:45

    16:45 -18:00 5. Gimm Gong Hoe (ISS : Gyeongsang National University, Korea)
    Beyond the 'Ricardian Framework': A Critique of Political Economy through Extending Value Theory at the Level of the World Market
    Discussant : Kim Jeong-joo (Gyeongsang National University, Korea)

    Closing 18:00



    Contact: Institute for Social Sciences
    900 Gajwa-dong, Jinju, 660-701
    Tel: +82-55-772-2541_Fax: +82-55-772-2542


    Patrick Bond and Eddie Cottle discuss SA World Cup lessons for Brazil, 13 June

    MEETING ON WORLD CUP CRITIQUE AND RESISTANCE, 13 June 2012 with Patrick Bond and Eddie Cottle (editor ofSA's World Cup: A Legacy for Whom?)



    TIME/VENUE: 8 pm at Hotel Regina in Flamengo, R. Ferreira Viana, 29 - http://www.hotelregina.com.br


    Patrick Bond at the Building and Wood Workers International, 11 June





    09:00 Arrival of Participants in Rio
    Venue: Royalty Copacabana Hotel
    Rua Toleleiros 154, Copacabana, Rio de Janeiro-RJ.
    The website is http://www.royaltyhotel.com.br/royalty-copacabana

    11:00 PLAYFAIR Meeting (By Invitation Only)
    ITUC, TUCA, BWI, IndustriAll

    12.00 Lunch (and lunch meeting for all staff) at Hotel Atlântico
    Hotel Atlântico Copacabana Rua Siqueira Campos 90, Copacabana, Rio de Janeiro-RJ.
    www.atlanticocopacabana.com.br

    14:00 Opening and Welcome: From Durban to Rio - Recap and Perspectives of BWI
    BWI has started to formulate and articulate its policies-agenda around the issue of sustainable development. Its 2010-2013 Strategic Plan refers to this major global concern and calls on the unions the engage governmental and economic actors to ensure that decent work and trade unions remain at the centre of discussions. In the COP 17, the various affiliates gathered together to define a preliminary policy document that also seeks greater coordination within BWI. This session shall take stock of what has been done, what are the challenges, and what remains to be acted upon.

    Coordinator and facilitator Nilton Freitas, BWI
    • Edison Bernardes, BWI Vice President Latin America and the Caribbean, Brazil
    • Ambet Yuson, General Secretary BWI


    14:30 Panel on Sustainable Development: What does it mean for BWI Industries?
    Sustainable development is a broad concept that has to be adapted and utilised to the real and pressing needs of the working people. Global debates and agreements have shown that the requirements of decent work and trade union rights are left behind in drafts and preliminary discussions. Labour issues have become vague in final agreements and policies. This is a challenge for us at the international platform. Additionally, the economic imperatives of sustainable development-climate change are changing our industries. It is important for the unions to understand the over-all road map of sustainable development discussions in Rio as well as share on what the concept means now in their respective industries. BWI has talked of Sustainable Forest Management (SFM) and Sustainable Construction for some years but these concepts and their applications need to be revisited and redefined in the current context.

    Chair: Marion Hellmann, BWI
     Understanding the Sustainable Development Debates and Processes: Nina Netzer, FES, Germany
     Green Economy and Sustainable Development: Patrick Bond, South Africa
     Sustainable Development and the Forest-Wood Sectors: Paul Opanga, BWI
     Sustainable Construction: Piet Matosa, NUM South Africa


    15:30 Coffee Break
    15:45 Plenary Discussions
    17:00 Session of Working Group on Action Plan and final Declaration
    (Internal BWI meeting)

    Session of Amazonia Unions on the Amazon Strategy
    (Internal BWI meeting)
    19:30 Solidarity Dinner
    Local: Restaurant Carretão Classic Grill Rua Siqueira Campos, 23 Copacabana
    http://www.carretaochurrascaria.com.br/br/copacabana

    12 June 2012, Tuesday
    BWI participants @ Trade Union Assembly

    Venue: Windsor Hotel located in the heart of Rio de Janeiro
    Avenida Presidente Vargas, 392 - Centro http://www.windsorhoteis.com.br/br/hoteis/windsor-guanabara/8/apresentacao.aspx

    07:30 Participants walk to the Trade Union Assembly (subway)

    08:30 Participation in Rio+20 Trade Union Assembly on Labour and Environment

    19:30 Dinner at Hotel Atlântico Copacabana
    Rua Siqueira Campos 90, Copacabana, Rio de Janeiro-RJ.
    www.atlanticocopacabana.com.br

    13 June, Wednesday
    BWI Multi-Sectoral Conference


    Venue: Royalty Copacabana Hotel
    Rua Toleleiros 154, Copacabana, Rio de Janeiro-RJ.
    http://www.royaltyhotel.com.br/royalty-copacabana/

    09:00 Opening Activities

    09:30 BWI Unions @ Work: Best Practices around Sustainability of BWI Industries

    Chair: Ambet Yuson, BWI
    • Rama Chandra Khuntia, President-INBCWF, India
    • Erasmo Cerrud, SUNTRACS, Panamá
    • Josuah Ansah, TWU, Ghana
    • Zivko Mitrevski, TUWFWIE, Macedonia

    Plenary Discussions


    11:00 Coffee Break>

    11:30 Panel Debate on Rio+20: The Global Unions Agenda and Actions
    The global trade union movement has followed the various institutional processes around the issues of sustainable development. They have tracked and engaged in numerous round of negotiations, consultations, and conferences. They lobbied both internationally and nationally. These actions have generated very comprehensive policy guidelines that reflect the interests and demands of the working people. BWI members have to understand the whole package of Global Unions agenda as possible handles for their international, regional, and national actions. Finally, these agendas have to be debated with other social actors specially governments and employers.

    Chair: Nilton Freitas, BWI
    Presenter: Anabella Rosemberg, ITUC
    Reactors:
    • Avelino Ganzer, Adviser of the General Secretary of the Presidency of Republic of Brazil
    • Rodolfo Tourinho, executive president of SINICON (to be confirmed)
    • Bill Street, PEFC
    • Fabíola Zerbini, FSC
    • Ruud Baars, FNVBouw, Netherlands


    Plenary Discussions

    13:00 Lunch Break

    14:30 Panel on Sustainability and Mega-Sports Events
    Brazil is not only hosting the Rio+20 Summit but is also the venue of 2 major sporting events the FIFA World Cup 2014 and the Rio Summer Olympics 2016. These 2 spectacles are creating thousands of jobs in BWI sector, creating modern infrastructures, will bring billions of dollars to the host countries and the sports organisations. These gains are trumpeted in many mega-sports events in the past years. But there were questions about how decent the work were, at what social

    expense in terms of housing rights where the stadiums built, and how economically sustainable are the edifices of the event after the torch has been past to another city or country. The Rio+20 is an important backdrop to start this debate so that future sports events become fair and sustainable.

    Chair: Mauricio Rombaldi, BWI
    • Introducing the Brazil Sports Campaign of BWI: Edison Bernardes, BWI vice-president for Latin America & Adalberto Galvão, president of SINTEPAV/BA, Salvador host city
    • Framing the Sustainability and Legacy of Sports Events: Eddie Cottle, BWI
    • From Athens 2004 to London 2012: How is the Track Record? Kristin Blom, ITUC and PLAYFAIR
    • Decent Work Report Card for UEFA EURO 2012: Vasyl Andreyev, Ukraine Building Union


    15:45 Plenary Discussions

    16:15 Coffee Break

    16:30 Final Action Planning and Recommendations

    17:30 Conclusions and Closing of Conference

    19:30 Dinner at Hotel Atlântico

    14 June 2012, Thursday
    Day of Action on BWI Sports Campaign


    09:00 Day of Action for BWI Sports Campaign in Brazil
    Stadium Inspection

    12.30 Staff lunch in hotel

    Close of conference

    14:00 BWI Technical Meeting and Wrap-Up

    15:00 Departure of Participants




    Click on image to enlarge


    Patrick Bond speaks at faculty strike support committee, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, 6 June




    Click on image to enlage



    CIDADES SUSTENTÁVEIS

    Unir o verde e o vermelho
    Em entrevista, o economista político Patrick Bond, diretor do Center for Civil Society da Universidade de KwaZulu-Natal, em Durban (África do Sul), e ativista de movimentos sociais, defende que a construção de cidades sustentáveis passa pela aliança da agenda ambientalista com a da justiça social
    por Silvio Caccia Bava

    Le Monde Diplomatique Brasil – Gostaria de começar perguntando o que você entende por sustentabilidade, o que isso significa.

    Patrick Bond – O significado clássico, formulado há 25 anos pela comissão Brundtland, fala que os direitos das gerações futuras não devem ser comprometidos pelo que fazemos hoje e que é fundamental que os direitos das pessoas pobres sejam colocados em primeiro lugar. Ao lado da opção preferencial dos pobres, como Leonardo Boff e a Teologia da Libertação pregam, está o limite ecológico ao crescimento, causado por formas organizacionais tecnológicas e sociais.

    Diplomatique – Entendemos claramente o que é insustentável e insustentabilidade, mas não está claro o que é sustentabilidade, entendida de várias maneiras. Como você prefere lidar com o tema?

    Bond – Há dez anos recebemos a Rio+10 em Johannesburgo. E uma das revelações mais interessantes foi o entendimento da cooptação corporativa. As empresas usavam as palavras “desenvolvimento sustentável”, mas o que queriam dizer era muito diferente. O lucro, a autorregulação, o comércio injusto foram travestidos sob a denominação da economia verde, que transforma a natureza em uma commodity. Sentimos isso dez anos atrás com algo que vocês conheceram na América Latina – a privatização da água nas cidades. Johannesburgo foi um dos principais locais de resistência e, finalmente, essa empresa francesa [Suez] foi expulsa em 2006 por causa das manifestações em Soweto.

    Também sentimos isso com a privatização do ar nas cidades, ou seja, o mercado de carbono, porque o programa piloto em 2002 foi em Durban, onde eu morava. O metano é proveniente de lixo podre, e querem capturá-lo e transformá-lo em energia elétrica. Descobrimos na época que a visão de sustentabilidade deles estava completamente oposta à dos ativistas sociais que viviam naquela área. A proposta destes era fechar o lixão, porque era um lixão de apartheid. E o Banco Mundial veio dizer que não, que seria sustentável manter o aterro, mas apenas para capturar o metano e transformá-lo em energia elétrica para o mercado de carbono. Foi lá que o desenvolvimento sustentável, na visão do Banco Mundial, se transformou em uma iniciativa de privatizar o ar e a água, isso em um lugar como Johannesburgo, a cidade mais desigual do país, mais desigual do mundo, porque já ultrapassamos o Brasil.

    A proposta da economia verde está em um ambiente de tanto conflito que eu volto ao que Brundtland disse: não se trata só da capacidade de as gerações futuras satisfazerem suas próprias necessidades; primeiro você atende às necessidades essenciais dos pobres do mundo, essa é a prioridade absoluta.

    Devemos repensar nossas cidades enquanto uma fonte de produção capitalista, geralmente para as exportações. Será que o trabalho e as pessoas que vivem ali também não são considerados commodities, assim como a natureza?

    Diplomatique – Ouvimos na Rio+20 de Leonardo Boff que não é viável unir desenvolvimento e sustentabilidade. Precisamos separar esses conceitos e lidar com eles isoladamente. Você concorda com isso?

    Bond – Concordo, especialmente se considerarmos que o desenvolvimento seja o crescimento capitalista, baseado em altos níveis de consumo.

    Diplomatique – Levando em conta esse cenário, é possível pensar em cidades sustentáveis hoje?

    Bond – Bem, se pudermos reestruturar a cidade para ser não apenas um centro de lucro... O que precisamos considerar é que as cidades já se tornaram enormes favelas, especialmente as megacidades africanas, que não têm muita indústria e onde o proletariado é muito pequeno; esse precariado enorme teve apenas essas favelas terríveis para ocupar; temos um verdadeiro planeta das favelas. E esses são lugares horríveis, obviamente, que podem ser só parcialmente humanizados pelo ativismo social. Precisamos de maiores níveis de planejamento ambiental, informado por pessoas pobres e da classe trabalhadora e suas organizações.

    Agora temos alguns exemplos maravilhosos. Em Durban, minha cidade, a cidade com o maior número de pessoas HIV positivo no mundo, há dez anos os medicamentos custavam US$ 15 mil por ano, e poucos tinham acesso a eles. Hoje temos um planejamento medicinal que permite que 1,5 milhão de pessoas recebam os medicamentos gratuitamente. Com a propriedade intelectual afrouxada graças aos esforços do governo brasileiro e ao fornecimento de medicamentos genéricos, conquistamos esse direito. Os ativistas lutaram arduamente contra os Estados Unidos, a Organização Mundial do Comércio e as farmacêuticas. Fomos capazes de conseguir isso.

    Então é um momento excepcionalmente rico da história, começando com os brasileiros e seu movimento contra a ditadura, a CUT, e depois o PT e o MST e os movimentos sociais urbanos ajudando-nos a entender como avançar, assim como os zapatistas o fizeram, assim como fez o movimento de justiça global contra a Organização Mundial do Comércio, em Seattle, assim como nossos ativistas da aids na África do Sul.

    As elites não têm possibilidade de planejamento. Ideologicamente, estão entre neoliberalismo e neoconservadorismo. Quando o 1% falha, temos uma opção, que envolve o poder social e o poder autônomo, mas também exige o financiamento e o planejamento do governo e um relaxamento do poder corporativo. As corporações, obviamente, têm de ficar para trás, como fizeram com a crise da aids.

    Diplomatique – Você conhece algum lugar na Terra onde haja uma cidade sustentável?

    Bond – Não, as cidades sustentáveis vão ser a última conquista, porque é nas cidades que o capital tem seus bastiões nas fábricas, suas plataformas de exportação e seu poder político. Mas é também nelas que o combate intenso está acontecendo. Temos exemplos do transporte em Curitiba ou em Porto Alegre, dos orçamentos participativos, que nós admiramos. Mas criar uma aliança de pessoas pobres e trabalhadoras e, além disso, ter uma perspectiva ambiental é profundamente difícil.

    As cidades são a plataforma para o capitalismo mundial. Se quisermos um movimento urbano ecossocialista mundial, vamos ter de trabalhar muito. Mas os sinais de que isso pode ser feito se mostram em todos os lugares, especialmente nos grandes espaços públicos.
    Diplomatique – Quais sinais?

    Bond – Na Praça Tahrir, por exemplo, nos movimentos Ocupar, em toda a América do Norte e na Europa, que se desdobraram em debates sobre sustentabilidade. Seu primeiro objetivo é despertar as sociedades que estão dormindo ou sem poder, também chamadas quiescentes; não são sociedades ativas. Uma sociedade como os Estados Unidos não teve nenhuma experiência democrática. Seu Congresso é controlado e comprado pelas corporações. Então o que eu achei brilhante no ano passado foi 40% de uma sociedade reacionária ter despertado e apoiado o movimento Ocupar. Isso é maior do que o Tea Party e pode se traduzir, numa próxima fase de organização, em movimentos para tomar as cidades, tomar espaços nas cidades, invocando um verdadeiro direito à cidade.

    Diplomatique – Você está sugerindo que as cidades sustentáveis podem ser construídas nesse cenário maior de hoje?

    Bond – Sim, temos de construir e reconstruir as cidades. As forças mais avançadas, inclusive a Confederação Nacional de Trabalhadores Metalúrgicos da África do Sul, estão tentando entender como podemos mudar nossas cidades, em termos de sistemas de energia, de transporte, de produção ou sistemas agrícolas e alimentares. Nosso consumo, nosso descarte, nosso financiamento. Essas questões só podem ser respondidas quando houver mais trabalhadores ativos exigindo mais empregos nesses setores, como a eletricidade solar, e menos empregos nas usinas termelétricas de carvão. Ou em indústrias automobilísticas que apenas constroem carros de luxo, que é o problema sul-africano. Esses são os tipos de transição que, se os trabalhadores se unirem com a comunidade e os ambientalistas, podem ser aprofundados.

    O que eu queria dizer com o exemplo de Johannesburgo é que não tivemos essa unidade. Tivemos os verdes dizendo que querem salvar o meio ambiente, e os vermelhos, a justiça social, dizendo que querem o trabalho e a comunidade. É a fusão do verde e do vermelho que precisamos fazer.
    Nossas lutas para a sustentabilidade urbana na África do Sul, hoje, estão entre as mais altas taxas de protesto no mundo, um protesto constante, trinta ou quarenta por dia. Tais manifestações são em defesa da água, da eletricidade, dos serviços urbanos, como bens públicos. Eu sempre vejo a luta pela sustentabilidade do ambiente doméstico como uma parte central da possibilidade de tornar as cidades mais justas. Mas nosso problema é que a ideologia e a organização, a liderança e a coerência de um movimento não chegaram.

    Os exemplos que tivemos quando olhamos para a América Latina continuam a nos inspirar. Vocês construíram osmovimentos sociais com maior escopo, escala e visão estratégica, e de forma democrática. Vocês estão bem à frente de nós. Então vocês do Brasil também têm de ajudar a articular o caminho.

    É a visão de Henri Lefebvre e de David Harvey − orientador do meu doutorado −, que dizem que o direito à cidade é muito mais do que os serviços municipais individuais, a habitação a ser construída, a creche ou o espaço para mulheres no metrô no Rio. Essas são as coisas que cada movimento tem de exigir e ganhar, pouco a pouco. Mas o ponto crucial para eles é quando essas demandas, pequenas e incrementais, aumentam até o ponto em que o sistema capitalista diz: “Desculpe, mas não vamos aceitá-las”.

    É preciso o otimismo da vontade. Todas as revoluções no último século e meio vieram quando as exigências de baixo podiam ser realizadas, mas o bloco dominante não desiste, porque sente que, enquanto as demandas crescem, seu próprio poder de reproduzir a sociedade à sua imagem está ameaçado. Esse é nosso trabalho, é ameaçar esse poder. E eles estão muito fracos agora.

    A coisa em que eu mais acredito é que precisamos ligar os pontos entre os movimentos como estes daqui e os da minha cidade, Durban. Não apenas falar sobre as necessidades de nossa habitação, de água, nossas necessidades de saúde, mas ligar os pontos.

    A maior decepção no Brasil é com o Fórum Social Mundial, que deveria ser o lugar onde poderíamos fazer isso em escala mundial, mas ainda não encontrou a fórmula que nos permita dar um empurrão progressista e coerente no mundo. Por um momento eu pensei que seria possível: era fevereiro de 2003. Todos em Porto Alegre disseram que deveríamos acabar com a guerra de George W. Bush contra o Iraque. Tínhamos 15 milhões de pessoas se manifestando nas ruas em todo o mundo. Mas depois perdemos a visão do trabalho de uma unificação estratégica global. Agora eu acho que talvez estejamos recuperando isso, porque a justiça econômica e o direito à cidade, o direito à Praça Tahrir, o direito ao Parque Zuccotti em Nova York ou o direito à Catedral de St. Paul, na cidade de Londres, ou centenas de outros, são agora objeto de uma contestação fantástica. Estamos vencendo parcialmente nesses lugares.

    Mais do que nunca estamos tomando o espaço urbano, que tem tantas possibilidades. Mesmo durante um período em que o capitalismo urbano neoliberal esculpe e espia o espaço com as televisões de circuito fechado, policiando-o, ainda estamos fazendo incursões que eles têm dificuldades reais de controlar.

    Diplomatique – Você entende que já temos todas as soluções tecnológicas para resolver os problemas e precisamos da revolução política?
    Bond – Não podemos ir tão longe assim, porque os maiores avanços tecnológicos têm sido suprimidos. E esses são as energias renováveis e o transporte público. Foram reprimidos pela indústria de combustíveis fósseis com fins lucrativos e pela indústria automobilística com fins lucrativos. Precisamos voltar aos sistemas mais integrados e de base comunitária, nos quais as pessoas se conhecem e se amam, em vez de serem isoladas, atomistas; os trabalhadores competitivos se transformarem em uma colmeia.

    O elemento que falta quando falamos de justiça climática é a capacidade dos jovens de dizer às pessoas mais velhas: vocês realmente ficarão nos devendo essa dívida climática, porque vocês nos deixaram, como Gro Harlem Brundtland advertiu, um futuro insustentável. Vocês nos impediram de viver uma vida plena e decente, por ocuparem demais o espaço de carbono. Esses são os desafios maravilhosos que pedem e exigem de nós pensar grande e ligar os pontos, para integrar o social e o ecológico, e politicamente misturar o vermelho e o verde, para que tenhamos uma abordagem saudável e unificada.

    Quando se tem uma crise na qual o sistema financeiro obtém todo o dinheiro público para seu socorro, obviamente não vai haver muito mais dinheiro para mudar nossa energia, transporte, sistemas agrícolas e urbanos e sistemas de produção da maneira necessária. Assim, a luta contra os banqueiros parece estar presente na agenda de muitas pessoas.
    Meu grande medo é que o Brasil, como foi decidido na reunião do G20, faça parte do refinanciamento do FMI. Serão cerca de US$ 100 bilhões vindos dos Brics – a África do Sul acaba de colocar US$ 2 bilhões –, o que significa que estamos nos colocando contra os trabalhadores e os pobres da Grécia. E quanto mais precisarmos obter esse dinheiro de volta por meio do FMI, mais nossos Brics e nossos países de renda média se tornarão subimperialistas, fazendo o trabalho sujo e financiando as instituições imperialistas. Esse é o perigo.

    Isso significa aplanar as aparentes contradições, mas não alterar as relações de poder. Por exemplo, a lógica interna do controle imperial francês e norte-americano do Haiti ou do FMI não muda em nada. Quando você tem brasileiros que ajudam a articular isso, então é mais perigoso, porque, assim como os sul-africanos que entram nessas instituições, isso lhes dá a credibilidade que lhes falta. Portanto, temos um trabalho para os movimentos urbanos no Brasil: manter um olho no que o Brasil faz regional e globalmente. O mesmo vale para a África do Sul.

    Silvio Caccia Bava
    Diretor e editor-chefe do Le Monde Diplomatique Brasil


    Patrick Bond lectures on carbon trading at the Brazilian Society of Political Economy, 5 June



    CONFERENCE PROGRAMME

    Mercado de carbono não vai salvar o capitalismo, diz economista
    Para Patrick Bond, professor de Economia da Universidade de KwaZulu-Natal, na África do Sul, o círculo vicioso do capitalismo, com produção como resposta para os problemas criados por ele na sociedade e no sistema financeiro, esbarrou no problema ambiental, que não é resolvido dentro dessa lógica. “Deixar apenas como um mecanismo de mercado? Deixar os banqueiros salvarem o planeta? Não! É maluquice!”, afirmou durante palestra na UFRJ.
    Rodrigo Otávio

    Rio de Janeiro - “Não! Não é possível. O mercado de carbono não vai resolver, ele está falhando”, afirmou Patrick Bond, professor de economia da universidade de KwaZulu-Natal, na África do Sul, em resposta à pergunta se o próprio capitalismo reverteria a crise financeira e ambiental que fecundou, principal tema colocado durante sua palestra “A Economia Política do Mercado de Carbono”. A palestra foi realizada na quinta-feira (7), no XVII Encontro Nacional de Economia Política, que acontece até sexta-feira na Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), apesar da greve nacional das instituições federais de ensino superior.

    Bond é taxativo ao descreditar os certificados negociáveis de empresas que reduziram suas emissões de gases poluentes como espaço regenarativo de mais produção, consumo e negócios. “Para mim e esse é o tipo de pergunta que devemos fazer quando queremos relativizar os problemas do capitalismo, ‘será que isso resolve o problema da produção?’. Usar a lógica de internalizar as externalidades não dá certo. O capitalismo não será bem sucedido em resolver um problema causado para o mercado com o mercado”, afirma.

    Para o economista, o círculo vicioso do capitalismo, com produção como resposta para os problemas criados por ele na sociedade e no sistema financeiro, esbarrou no problema ambiental, que não é resolvido dentro dessa lógica. “Deixar apenas como um mecanismo de mercado? Deixar os banqueiros salvarem o planeta? Não! É maluquice!”, vocifera Bond.

    Bond embasa sua oposição ao explicar que a resposta do mercado foi a “comoditização” do ambiente como a grande área de crescimento após a exaustão do ouro, da prata e da propriedade. “Recentemente uma rede internacional anunciou que tem três milhões de unidade do ambiente brasileiro para pôr no mercado mundial. O que é isso? Como se permite? Qual a ligação do Brasil com a privatização do ar?”, questiona.

    Truques
    Nesse novo mercado, o economista aponta um dos mecanismos que estão criando a bolha de carbono. “É um truque técnico para limitar a poluição e permitir que as grandes corporações poluam mais. Ou se paga outras companhias que poluam menos para uma espécie de tabela de compensações, ou se faz essa compensação com árvores que seqüestrem carbono no Brasil. E aí dizem, ‘poluímos mais no hemisfério Norte porque temos plantações que tiram esse carbono do ar no Brasil’”, afirma ele.

    Citando truques, o sul-africano volta às raízes da criação do mercado de carbono. “A aposta sempre foi o ‘neoliberalismo do carbono’. Al Gore (ex-vice presidente dos Estados Unidos), em 1997, em Kyoto, disse que se a ONU aceitasse o comércio de carbono, para que as corporações continuassem a poluir, os EUA assinariam o protocolo. Foi uma chantagem. Só que depois, no Senado americano, a assinatura perdeu por 95 a 0. Ou seja, ele não assinou e impôs a lógica do mercado de carbono”.

    Para ele, esse mecanismo, ao não consertar a questão climática, acaba virando mais um custo. “E eles não fazem nada. Estão apostando que os mercados de carbono continuarão a existir. E com o Brasil e a África do Sul acordados, significa um subimperilaismo do carbono”.

    Sem saída
    Bond classifica a questão central como a impossibilidade de se financiar uma transição para uma ampla economia pós-carbono com os preços e as formas que esse mercado está estipulando, que varia entre sete e 35 euros por tonelada. “o comércio não tem as pré-condições necessárias para estabelecer operações e transações líquidas, até por causa da quantidade desses certificados de emissões roubados e fraudados. Ou seja, esse mercado está minado”.

    A resposta que o economista tateia recai em uma estratégia fora desse mercado em implantação, mas em um ponto ideológico a partir da crise ambiental. “Precisamos começar a descobrir como fica o ecossocialismo, lutar contra os yuppies-verdes e os ecocapitalistas que estão por aí. A questão deve chegar não só ao pagamento da dívida ecológica, mas também à restauração ecológica”.





    Click on image to enlarge


    Patrick Bond on debt crises at Queens University, Canada, 30 May



    Debt, uneven development and capitalist crisis in South Africa: The first 200 years
    By Patrick Bond, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
    Presented to the ‘Repoliticizing Debt’ conference
    Queen’s University Development Studies, Kingston, Canada, 30-31 May 2012


    Repoliticizing Debt
    Provisional Workshop Program
    At Queen’s University, Donald Gordon Conference Centre,
    30-31 May 2012

    The goals of the Workshop sessions are: (a) to advance and deepen our understanding of debt by engaging in focused discussions in order to rethink and clarify the issues and questions that motivate this workshop, and to evaluate and if need be, to refine, our hypotheses; and (b) to provide the authors of the papers as much feedback as possible.

    To make maximum use of the time available, each participant will be required to write his/her paper at least one month in advance. The bundle of papers will then be circulated to all participants; all participants are asked (1) to read all the papers, and (b) to make written comments and/or suggestions to the individual authors. The comments will be collected and distributed (electronically) to all workshop participants two weeks prior to the workshop. At the workshop, each author will present her/his paper for approximately 20 minutes. The presentation will be followed by a roundtable discussion that will be moderated by the Chair and based on a summary of the written comments. The proceedings will be tape-recorded and annotated by graduate students, and these notes will be circulated to all participants. In addition, graduate students will be involved in putting together an edited video based on the discussion that will be used for educational and outreach purposes. The venue will be the Donald Gordon Conference Centre, which is a state-of-the-art conference centre fully owned and operated by Queen’s University.

    A workshop format has been adopted rather than a conference format to facilitate focused and detailed exchange and analysis. To achieve further cohesion, each paper will focus on two or more of the following questions:

  • What are the power relations underpinning this seemingly harmonious, neutral and natural exchange between creditors and borrowers?

  • What are the implications of this power for the social reproduction of everyday life in the wider processes of neoliberalization(s)?

  • What are the class, racial, ecological, and/or gendered aspects of debt relations?
  • Does debt take on different meanings in various social spaces (e.g., global, local, national, regional)?

  • What are the temporal dimensions of debt and what are their implications for the world’s most vulnerable segments of society?

  • And, what are the spaces of resistance that can be opened by challenging and widening the meaning and scope of debt?


  • These questions will be addressed within several thematic sessions, each of which build on each other and address specific gaps in the literature on debt. Specifically, the Workshop Sessions will be organized into the following five themes:

    I: Debt and Money
    II: Debt and Discipline
    III: Debt and Financialization
    IV: Debt and Environment
    V: Debt and Human Security


    DAY 1
    9:00 Welcome: Representative from the Vice-Principal (Research , Queen’s University.
    Adrienne Roberts and Susanne Soederberg, “Introduction: aims & objectives of the workshop”.
    9:30-11:00 Session I: Debt and Money
    Chair: Adrienne Roberts
    1. Susanne Soederberg, “The Social Power of Money and the Colonizing Structures of Debt”
    2. Regina Austin, “‘BLACK PEOPLE’S MONEY’: An Essay on the Interaction of Law, Economics and Culture in the Context of Race”
    3. Brigitte Young, “The Social Form of Money: Creditors and Debtors in the European Sovereign Debt Crisis”
    Discussant: TBA
    11:00 -11:30 Tea & Coffee
    11:30 – 1:00 Session II: Debt and Discipline
    Chair: Susanne Soederberg
    4. David McNally, “Debt, Discipline and the Constitution of Race and Class Under Neoliberalism”
    5. Genevieve LeBaron, “Discipline, Debt, and Daily Life: Mapping Shifts in the Neoliberal Financing of U.S. Social Reproduction”
    6. Linda Coco, Title TBA
    Discussant: TBA
    1:00-2:15 Lunch
    Lunch 2:30-4:30Lunch Session III: Debt and Financialization
    Chair: Katherine Rankin
    7. Patrick Bond, “Uneven Development, Crisis and Financial Power”
    8. Randy Martin, “From Development to Indifference: Finance and the Decomposition of the Professional Managerial Class”
    9. Leanne Roderick, “Swapping Flesh for Data: An Analysis of Debt, Abstraction, and Violence in Digital Capitalism”
    Discussant: TBA
    6:00 Reception hosted by the Vice-Provost(International) Dean John M. Dixon and Associate Dean James K.W. Lee (Research), Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Queen’s University, followed by dinner.

    DAY 2
    9:00-11:00 Session IV: Debt and Environment
    Chair: Brigitte Young
    1. Philip McMichael, “Value-Chain Agriculture and Debt Relations: Contradictory Outcomes”
    2. Marcus Taylor, “Micro-Financing Climate Change Adaptation? The Limits to Pursuing Sustainability Through the Expansion of Debt” 3. Kate Ervine, “The Green Sectoral Bond: The Political Economy of Debt-Financed Climate Change Mitigation”
    4. Sébastien Rioux, “Food, Debt and Social Reproduction: Neoliberal Market Insecurity and the Political Economy of Consumption in the U.S.”
    Discussant: TBA
    11:00-11:30 Tea & Coffee
    11:30-1:00 Session V: Debt and Human Security
    Chair: David McNally
    5. Katherine Rankin, “Critical Geographies of Poverty Finance”
    6. Adrienne Roberts, “Comparative Reflections on the Gendered and Racial Dimensions of Debt and Bankruptcy in Canada, the US and the UK”
    7. Suzanne Bergeron, “Credit, Empowerment and Social Reproduction in World Bank Gender Policy”
    8. Gavin Fridell, “Debt Politics and the Free Trade Package”
    Discussant: TBA
    1:00-2:00 Lunch
    2:00 – 3:30 Conclusions & Discussion of Publication and Grant Application Plans Discussion led by Adrienne Roberts and Susanne Soederberg, with the assistance of Leanne Roderick.


    Patrick Bond gives keynote address at Sussex Univ SouthGovNet conference 16-17 May





    Subimperialism as lubricant of neoliberalism
    South Africa’s emergence from the apartheid laager


    By Patrick Bond, University of KwaZulu-Natal Centre for Civil Society
    presented to the
    Research Network on Global Governance and the Emerging Global South
    conference on
    Rising Powers and the Future of Global Governance

    Panel on ‘Resistance and Civil Society’
    Centre for Global Political Economy, University of Sussex, 16 May 2012






    Rising Powers and the Future of Global Governance

    16th/17th May 2012
    Centre for Global Political Economy
    University of Sussex


    Programme


    Wednesday

    9.00 to 9.30 - Registration and Coffee/Tea

    9.30 to 10.45 – Keynote Speech (1)
    - James Mittelman (American University) – “Global Bricolage: Emerging Market Powers and Polycentric Governance”

    Coffee/Tea break

    11.15 – 12.45 – Panel 1. Rising Powers and Hegemonic Transition?
  • Kees van der Pijl (Sussex) - Classes in China's Contender State Experience
  • Ren Xiao (Fudan) – Debating China’s Rise in China

  • Gonzalo Berron (Sao Paulo) and Jean Tible (Sao Paulo) – “The Rise of Brazil as a Global Development Power”

  • Kevin Gray (Sussex) – “Hegemonic Transition and the Rise of Neo-Conservatism in South Korea”


  • 12.45 – 13.45 Lunch

    13.45 – 15.15 – Simultaneous Panels

    Panel 2. Domestic Structures & Rising Powers
  • Alejandro Milcíades Peña (City, London) - Global Governance, Global Standards, and the Local: The Case of Brazil

  • Jayita Sarkar (Graduate Institute, Geneva) – “Big state, Big science, Big projects”: The Nuclear Energy Programme and State (Un)-Managerialism in India

  • Lonella Streitz (Missouri) - Creating A Governance Framework for Economic Sanctions: Global Public Policy Networks and Public Sector Knowledge Networks


  • Panel 3. New Regional Strategies: South-South Solidarity?
  • Kairat Moldashev (Malaya) - Regional responses to global crisis: the case of Moscow-led Regionalism

  • Filipa Bismarck Amorim Coelho - (Re)action of the European Union toward the Rising Powers of Global South

  • Ipshita Basu (Brac) - China-India Relations in the South Asian Region: Aid Diplomacy, Security and Regional Power


  • 15.15-15.4 Coffee/Tea break

    15.45 – 17.15
    Panel 4 - Resistance and Civil Society

  • Hadeer El Shafie (Institute of Development Studies) - To Conform or to Unite? Power Dynamics in Cairo’s Public Space

  • Patrick Bond (Kwazulu Natal) - Subimperialism as lubricant of neoliberalism: South Africa's emergence from the apartheid laager

  • Anna Ochkina (ISMD, Moscow) - The global crisis and alternatives for the World and Russia

  • Rosie Peppin Vaughan (Institute of Education) - Leading questions: global governance, education and women’s activism


  • 17.30 – 19.15 – The Global Crisis and the Global South: which way forward?
    Roundtable with:
  • Ren Xiao (Fudan)

  • Boris Kagarlitsky (ISGO, Moscow)

  • Barry Gills (Newcastle)

  • Gonzalo Berron (Sao Paulo)

  • Neera Chandhoke (Delhi)


  • 19.30 Conference dinner (Venue TBC)

    Thursday 17 May 2012

    9.00 Coffee/Tea.

    9.30 to 10.45 – Keynote 2. Achin Vanaik (Delhi) “Global Capitalism's Search for Stability: Enter the New Quintet and Other Emerging Powers”

    Coffee/Tea break

    11.15 – 12.45 – Simultaneous Panels

    Panel 1. Beyond Neoliberal Global Governance?
  • Neera Chandhoke (Delhi) - Emerging Powers and Global Poverty

  • Christian May (Goethe) & Andreas Nölke (Goethe) - BRIC Capitalism and the new Illiberal Global Economic Order

  • Sacha Dierckx (Ghent) - Brazil, China and capital controls: towards the end of neoliberalism?


  • Panel 2. Rising Powers and the African Continent
  • Giles Mohan (Open University) - Towards a critical geo-politics of China’s engagement with African Development

  • Raphael Zaffran, Tu Chi Nguyen - Provider or Predator? China's Pragmatism in Africa and its Impact on Governance

  • Jennifer Constantine & Alex Shankland (Institute of Development Studies) - Brazilian imaginaries of Africa and South-South Cooperation: the case of social technology transfer

  • Soyeun Kim (Leeds) – “Between a rock and hard place -- Korea's Africa strategy”

    12.45 – 13.45 Lunch

    Coffee/Tea break

    13.45– 15.15 – Simultaneous Panels

    Panel 3. Rising Powers and Global Trade
  • James Scott (Manchester) and Rorden Wilkinson (Manchester) - ‘China and the WTO.’

  • Kristen Hopewell (Michigan) - New Powers in Global Governance: Multipolarity, Multilateral Disintegration and the Stillbirth of Neoliberalism at the WTO

  • Josué Mathieu (Cambridge) - Like bulls in a china shop? Rising powers and the settlement of disputes at the WTO

  • Koray Mutlu (McMaster) – The Global Financial Crisis and the Doha Round negotiations: implications for the future of the multilateral implications for the future of the multilateral trade regime.


  • Panel 4. Rising Powers as an Actor: One or Many
  • Peter Ferdinand (Warwick) - BRICS States’ Voting in the UN General Assembly

  • Dani K. Nedal (Aberystwyth) - Asymmetries in the Emerging Camp

  • Matthew David Stephen (Berlin Graduate School for Transnational Studies) - How I learnt to Stop Worrying and Love Global Governance: The IBSA Rising Powers and World Order

  • Mikko Huotari (Freiburg) - Emerging powers and the ‘global financial order’



  • 15:45 – 17.00 – Keynote 3. Patrick Bond “Imperial and subimperial interests in neoliberalised nature: from Durban COP17 to Rio+20”


    Iain Ewok Robinson MCs the Brutus Sessions, 16 May



    Date: 16 May 2012
    Time: 4:00 – 5:30
    Venue: Centre for Creative Arts House (UKZN Howard College Campus)
    Entry: Free

    Presented by the Centre for Creative Arts and the Centre for Civil Society at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, the inaugural BRUTUS SESSIONS will be the first live presentation by the BRUTUS POETS.

    This collective will be acting under the auspices of the legacy of Dennis Brutus, an inspiring man who was unwavering in his commitment to arts activism, a 'humanist' who was able through his work to serve all people of the world who suffer a multitude of injustices that continue to corrode, corrupt and decay our world. This is the banner that the BRUTUS POETS rally towards, with the simple agenda of putting conscious pen to paper, to provide a poetic platform for others to stand on. The BRUTUS SESSIONS will be a reminder that consistent critical consciousness and social awareness will always be the initial catalyst for real change. Let us keep launching these forays into the mainstream consciousness, to keep the boat rocking with the motion that Dennis Brutus dedicated his life to. His passion and productivity has no less relevance now then when he was with us, and we have the opportunity to carry his wisdom, his wit and his words with us, into new heads and hearts, for the sake of us all. With Dennis Brutus as our inspiration, we could not have a more solid foundation to stand on, to help others to find their footing and together lift ourselves to the next level of community and consciousness.

    Hosted by EWOK

    Line up of events:
    4:00pm - Musical performance by Matt Wilson
    4:15pm - BRUTUS POETS
    4:45pm - Musical interlude with UKZN musicians
    4:55pm - Open mic (6 slots of 5min each for open mic participants)
    5:25pm - Closing
    5:30pm - End

    For more info about this and other CCA events go to www.cca.ukzn.ac.za


    Patrick Bond booklaunch on climate justice at Bookmarks, London, 14 May

    join us in London to discuss
    Climate Justice Politics between Durban and Rio

    Monday 14 May, 6.30-8pm at Bookmarks, 1 Bloomsbury Street

    Call 020 7637 1848 or email sarah@bookmarks.uk.com to reserve your place
    www.bookmarksbookshop.co.uk
    www.facebook.com/events/440637892620332/



    Patrick Bond chronicles the main conflicts over climate change, from the standpoint of putting social justice at the centre of politics. His two new books, Durban’s Climate Gamble and Politics of Climate Justice, document problems of elite mismanagement of climate governance at global scale, and possibilities for the required economic transformation from below.

    Between the United Nations COP17 climate summit in Durban last December and the UN Rio de Janeiro Earth Summit in June, the political momentum for ecological privatisation - ‘neoliberalised nature’ - has risen. Yet in practice, carbon markets and other commodification policies are failing. However, critics are also on the back foot, as Bond explains by assessing how the CJ movement has ebbed since a peak in London and Copenhagen in late 2009. If so, what directions are open for progressive environmentalism when confronting the greatest challenge capitalism has ever offered our people and planet?

    (Bond is senior professor of Development Studies and director of the Centre for Civil Society at the University of KwaZulu-Natal in Durban – http://ccs.ukzn.ac.za – and has authored/edited a dozen books on South Africa, Zimbabwe and the world economy.)


    Film & discussion hosted by Green Squad Alliance, 11 May


    Date/Time: Friday 11 May 2012, 12:30-2:00 Venue: CCS, 6th floor MTB, Howard College, UKZN
    For more information contact:
    Delwyn 071 621 8305 / 031 708 3409
    greensquadalliance@gmail.com


    Khadija Sharife talks on Tax Justice to the Economic Justice Network, 9 May

    Civil Society Conference: Strategising for Tax Justice and Development

    Organised by the Economic Justice Network (EJN)
    9 and 10 May 2011

    Lady Hamilton Hotel, 10 Union Str. Gardens Cape Town


    CONFERENCE PROGRAMME


    The global economic crisis that hit the world is largely attributed to the financial crisis. It is however widely recognised by progressive civil society that the world is faced with a multi-faceted crisis characterised by high levels of unemployment, socio-economic problems such as increasing energy, food and water crises and a looming ecological disaster as a consequence of climate change. Despite the magnitude of these crises world leaders continue to follow a growth-based economic model expanding consumption and production, competition and wealth accumulation.

    Dot Keet 1 noted:
    ‘The ever-expanding production and technological growth under capitalism produces not only enormous production and overproduction with simultaneous over-consumption and ‘under-consumption’ (a euphemism for dire poverty for specific social and geographical sectors). These dynamics also produce the vast over-accumulation and concentration of capital and the rise to dominance of the financial sector. In this situation, the unregulated - and deliberately de-regulated - activities of financial institutions and financial speculators accentuate their economic dominance.’

    When world leaders came to together as the G20, their primary tasks was to find ways to address the ‘financial crisis’, through programmes to deal with the global economic ‘meltdown’ and formulate a new ‘financial architecture’.2

    The next Summit of the G20 will take place in Mexico. South Africa is the only African country that is part of the G20 and co-chairs the Development Working Group. The key questions are: is the G20 making in-roads into international financial regulatory oversight and reforming the global financial architecture? What measures are the G20 proposing to ensure greater accountability of multi-national corporations and the super wealthy? Can we rely on the G20 to come up with radical solutions or will they merely tinker with symptoms of the crisis?

    When the multi-dimensional crises hit the world, some African leaders believed that because the continent was decoupled from the global economy, there would be no huge impact on the African economies. However African economies are largely dependent on primary commodities and heavily rely on donor aid for socio-economic needs. African leaders have largely bought into the neo-liberal orthodoxy and are trapped in the shackles of neoliberal institutions and the ‘donor’ governments. Dani Nabudere stressed that African leaders cannot be left blameless as they ‘have all along been externalising financial resources intended for development for their own countries by stealing these resources and banking them in their private accounts’.3 He pointed out that studies revealed that capital flight from 40 African countries surveyed between 1970 and 2004 amounted to US$607billion including interest earnings, compared to the US$227 billion external debt owed by those countries. In the words of Dani Nabudere, ‘African leaders have contributed to the activities of ‘shadow banks’ being used to create ‘toxic debt’; their wealth contributing to the global economic turmoil’. So while Africa is often seen as a victim of the illicit financial flows and sophisticated tax avoidance mechanisms such as transfer pricing and tax havens of multi-national corporations (MNCs) and the wealthy, powerful leaders that aid these unlawful actions need to be taken to task.

    Tax is an important vehicle for redistribution, a resource to meet socio-economic needs of citizens and a source of sustainable income, and therefore it is imperative that transparent and accountable measures are in place to harness this resource at global, regional and national levels. Civil society organisations have a vital role to play to ensure greater accountability of tax collection and expenditure by governments as well as advocating for just and equitable tax, particularly by increasing taxation of MNCs and the super wealthy.

    In 2011 EJN, in collaboration with the South Africa Council of Churches (SACC), National Labour and Economic Development Institute (NALEDI), Tax Justice Network Africa (TJN-A), Christian Aid and a few leading southern African-based and South African civil society actors involved in economic justice issues, held a tax justice strategy meeting to influence South Africa’s agenda at the G20. The meeting agreed on the relevance of tax justice issues in the region, with particular emphasis on the ongoing global campaign to end tax haven secrecy, tackle tax dodging; and the potential to develop a shared strategy to influence the South African government in the G20 as well as to take on board addressing ‘global-level’ harmful tax practices.

    Civil society organisations are hosting a follow-up strategy meeting to build and strengthen the strategic activities of the previous year on 9 and 10 May, in Cape Town, South Africa.

    The objectives of the strategy meeting are to:

  • Deepen our understanding of the G20 and the role the South African government can play as a member of the G20


  • Build on actions at the global dimension of the tax justice agenda that call for an end to financial secrecy offered by tax havens and demand increasing transparency of financial transactions and tackle tax dodging.


  • Develop concrete plans to influence tax justice in the Southern African region, enforce greater domestic resource mobilisation and expose perverse tax incentives in investment agreements particularly in the extractive sector.


  • Develop national plans and actions to increase tax revenue through taxing the rich and increasing corporate taxation to meet social services and developmental needs of citizens.


  • 1. Dot Keet (2012), Implications of the Global Crisis – Challenges facing SA, SADC and the rest of Africa, Extract from a longer paper presented at the SADC C-NGO ‘Policy Dialogue’, Gaborone, 2nd August 2010

    2. Dani W. Nabudere, (2009). The G20 Summit and Africa, http://pambazuka.org/en/category/comment/55319

    3. Ibid



    Patrick Bond at Comrade Babble play on Kebbleism, Johannesburg, 5 May


    Click to enlarge

    Kebble takes centre stage
    Kwanele Sosibo 4 May 2012

    The timing of the play Comrade Babble's staging is rather uncanny. Poet, playwright and activist Allan Horwitz's new political satire on the life and times of Brett Kebble comes in the midst of yet another absurd twist to the tragic drama that was the controversial businessman's 41 years of life.

    On May 4, the day the play was set to open, the executors of his estate were scheduled to appear in the South Gauteng High Court to battle the ANC for an ever-shrinking pot of gold that, after a series of negotiations, has been trimmed from R14-million to R250 000.

    Although the trustees argue in court papers that no value was received for the money paid, the ANC argues -- some may suggest shamelessly so -- that Kebble obtained the benefit of access to political decision-makers and lawmakers that would be beneficial to him both directly and indirectly by virtue of its benefits to the companies in which he had an interest.

    The money, the ANC says, also enabled Kebble to promote for his benefit and that of those companies in which he had an interest conditions more favourable for the conduct of his business. City Press reported that in an amended plea through attorney Brian Kahn, the party later denied having received the money.

    Tales of Kebble's largesse and how he had several members of the ANC and its youth league firmly in his pocket have been in the public domain for some time now, serving to caricature those implicated to embarrassing effect. Taken in his early social context, in which the doughy Kebble was surrounded by macho manifestations of manhood, Horwitz frames his rise to fame and power as the revenge of the fat boy. However, the writer's deeper interest lies in the archetypal significance of this self-styled Randlord.

    Kebble was an out-and-out conman who confused people with his tongue, said Horwitz during an interview at a Rosebank coffee shop. During his emergence in the mid-Nineties the mines retrenched 400 000 workers in five years. Kebble initially symbolised a promise to change. His rise posed the question: Was there indeed a patriotic bourgeoisie? But he was not the only con man around …

    Horwitz, a former trade unionist, said the play's satirical bent allowed him to tell a few home truths about our situation, using a medium that is not propagandist and accessible to people beyond the radical left.

    The dynamic yet treacherous Comrade Babble, who comes back from the dead to tell his side of the story, has suitably mythical and Renaissance-era monikers such as Mephistopheles and Medici. He keeps the company of a Mafia don named Butch Deratti, has a youth league leader named Professor Ndlovu (Orlyfunt Holdings, perhaps?) on his payroll and is offed by a hitman going as Mshini de Boom.

    Directed by Alby Michaels, the play sees Lebohang Motaung and David James go through six characters. Comrade Babble opens on May 4 at the Market Theatre Lab and runs until May 13. Saturday night's show will be followed by a discussion on Kebbleism, chaired by Centre for Civil Society director Professor Patrick Bond.
    mg.co.za
    markettheatre.co.za

    Death throes of Crony Capitalism 2.0
    Brett Kebble continues teaching from the grave

    Patrick Bond

    The machinations of the late Brett Kebble remain of enduring interest, not least because he ripped off maybe a billion and a half rand in his decade of CEO chaos.

    Last Friday, at Johannesburg’s Market Theatre, Allan Horwitz’s parody play about Kebble, Comrade Babble, opened to a packed house. The same day, the African National Congress settled an out-of-court bill with the Kebble estate trustees, based on money dished out after he was technically bankrupt. Of more than R20 million in gifts to the ANC and its leading politicians, the trustees honed in on R250 000 donated in 2004.

    ANC treasurer Matthews Phosa initially refused to give it back, arguing on behalf of bribery: “Kebble obtained the benefit of access to political decision makers and lawmakers that would be beneficial to him, both directly and indirectly, by virtue of its benefits to the companies in which he had an interest.”

    With the Kebble bill behind them, ANC leaders can now turn to a related task at a funeral on Saturday: restoring the image of ‘Category 1’ state hero Sicelo Shiceka, a man responsible not only for a Kebble-caliber hedonistic lifestyle paid involuntarily by others, but also for so many service delivery protests through brutal tactics honed when he was Gauteng local government MEC fifteen years ago.

    As Shiceko bragged when personally commandeering a Caterpillar to cut all the water and electricity mains into townships after a 1997 spate of non-payment, “We are now at the stage of coercion, and it’s paying dividends.”

    Shiceka was promoted to local government minister, and you can joke all you want about his ‘turnaround’-and-around strategy – where we are left in precisely the same place in municipal service non-delivery as before – but you cannot question his commitment to class war against his constituents, dressed up as always in talk-left walk-right drag.

    Indeed we should all learn from Kebble’s fate about three kinds of colour-coded Crony Capitalisms. Through the mid-1990s, you could call South Africa a case of Crony Capitalism 1.0 in which state and corporate corruption flourished and white-on-white accumulation was facilitated by white-against-black apartheid violence and exploitation.

    From 1994 until recently, it was still largely white-against-black oppression at the workplace that allowed black-on-white accumulation (‘BEE’) in Crony Capitalism 2.0, whose depths were plumbed by Kebble’s largesse and the ethics of his trainee, Mzi Khumalo, from whom the SA Reserve Bank now seeks an illegally-expatriated R1 billion.

    “The era of mega-BEE wealth transfers is gone for good,” Gordon Institute of Business Science researcher Andile Makhunga told City Press last week, because BEE “simply transferred wealth to a few individuals – while in the rest of the economy, black people’s incomes were declining significantly.”

    Kebble got away with it for way too long thanks to the lack of regulator oversight, as well as the blindness of South Africa’s business journalists, with the exception of noseweek’s Martin Welz and The Citizen’s Paul Kirk, both of whom made it to Kebble’s ‘hit list’. Kebble’s financial supporters were creditor Investec and the R220 billion Allen Gray fund. State regulators were simply absent.

    What of Crony Capitalism 3.0’s fate? With the demise of Julius Malema’s tenderpreneurship, and with the denouement of Aurora looting – featuring Zuma nephew Khulubuse, Zuma lawyer Michael Hulley and Mandela grandson Zondwa – we see the terminal logic of black-on-black accumulation. (Although to break the mould, the Solidarity trade union argues that there was also substantial unpaid black-on-white exploitation of its members at Pamodzi.)

    In September 2005, Kebble suffered what the National Prosecuting Authority termed an ‘assisted suicide’, shocking South Africa. The man who hired the shooters, Clinton Nassif, “was looking for means of killing Kebble in a way that would not look like a suicide, so that the insurance could still pay out and look after his family,” Nassif’s main assistant testified in court.

    To add to the confusion, even after Kebble’s financial fall and disreputable death, a horde of politicians and business elites proudly attended his Cape Town funeral: Essop Pahad, David Gleason, Brigitte Radebe, Saki Macozoma, Peter Gray, Mafika Mkwanazi, Tokyo Sexwale, Tony Yengeni, Ebrahim Rasool, Mo Shaik, Pam Golding, Nomaindia Mfeketo, Limpho Hani, Mbulelo Goniwe, Baleka Mbete and Dali Tambo.

    The pallbearers were ANC youth leaders Lunga Ncwana, Songezo Mjongile, Andile Nkuhlu and Sharif Pandor. Sports minister Fikile Mbalula, the Malema ally anticipated to run against incumbent Gwede Mantashe for general secretary of the ANC at Mangaung in December, was a well-lubricated beneficiary with a taste for Johnnie Walker Blue.

    May their names always be associated with Kebble, and may someone please provide an assisted suicide to the tendency in the ruling party seeking the next disastrous edition of Crony Capitalism.


    Kebble, Crony Capitalism 2.0 and the Wretched of South Africa
    Patrick Bond 4 April 2012


    Brett Kebble and his advisee, Jacob Zuma

    Do Pretoria and Johannesburg deserve the fate of Sodom and Gomorrah, cities along the ancient Jordan River which were, according to The Book of Genesis, consumed by fire and brimstone as punishment for sinful hedonism?

    Etymologically, Sodom – today just a salt pan at the Dead Sea – comes from ‘fortified’ and Gomorrah meant ‘deep’ with ‘copious water.’ So the names match nicely, given the respective catastrophes besetting Pretoria’s police – national commissioners Jackie Selebi and Bheki Cele implicated in corruption with a potential third, Richard Mdluli, nearly there – and Joburg’s goldmines: Acid Mine Drainage; a corrupt Paris firm’s 2001-06 water commercialization (causing a decade’s worth of Soweto community protests); and at the city’s main post-apartheid water source in Lesotho’s dams, notorious eco-destructive graft.
    http://ccs.ukzn.ac.za/default.asp?2,68,3,2593

    Patrick Bond directs the UKZN Centre for Civil Society.


    Patrick Bond skype lecture on media and climate policy, Bergen, Norway, 7 May



    Durban’s Conference of Polluters, market failure and critic failure

    COP17 coverage:South African business media blind faith in markets



    Climate Crossroads Workshop, 7. og 8. Mai, 2012

    Hotell: Scandic Hotel i Håkonsgaten 2
    Møterom: 7. mai vil møtet foregå i 9. etasje på SV-bygget
    8. mai vil vi være i 8. etasje på Scandic
    9. mai er det konferanse i auditorium 4 i Juss-bygget (Dragefjellet)
    Måltider: lunsj serveres i tilknytning til møterom, felles middager på byen

    Program

    1. dag: mandag 7. mai. Møtet foregår i 9. etasje i SV-bygget (Lauritz Meltzers Hus)

    10.00-10.15 Velkommen og introduksjon til samlingen

    10.15-12.15 Climate Justice
  • Patrick Bond: Media and climate change policy (på skype)

  • Jill Johannessen: Climate justice: A vital media narrative?

  • Kommentar: Mofiz

  • Mofizur Rhaman: Climate justice and journalism in Bangladesh

  • Kommentar: Jill


  • 12.15-13.00 Lunsj

    13.00-14.30 Global politics
  • Lasse Hansen: Democracy and climate change policy-making in the Pacific: the case of Kiribati

  • Kommentar: Ane T. I.

  • Ane Teksum Isbrekken: Media and climate change on the Salomon Islands

  • Kommentar: Lasse

  • Dina-Kristin Midtflo: Climate Refugees, Sovereignty, and Human Rights

  • Kommentar: Silje og Risto

  • Erla Løvseth: Korleis ein kan måle climate change performance

  • Kommentar: Eivind


  • 14.30-15.00 Pause

    15.00-16.30 Media, ideology and politics
  • Rune Ottosen & Roger Gjermundshaug: Horse race media rhetoric and fake cheers for victory. Underreporting the climate issue in the coverage of Lofoten

  • Kommentar: Sondre

  • Sondre Båtstrand: Fra politisering til ideologisering av klimaendringer

  • Kommentar: Rune


  • 16.30-17.00 Pause

    17.00-17.30 Media Climate
  • Elisabeth Eide and Risto Kunelius: An update on the Media Climate project

  • Kommentar: Lise


  • Middag
    2. dag: tirsdag 8. mai. Møtet foregår i 8. etasje på Scandic (ved kinoen)

    09.00-10.30 SIFO-undersøkelsen
  • Eivind Stø og Marthe Austgulen: Gjennomgang av resulatene fra undersøkelsen. Diskusjon av analyser og perspektiver på dataene

  • Kommentar: Elisabeth & Siri


  • 10.30-10.45 Pause

    10.45-11.45 Nye masterprosjekt
  • Laila Borge: ”Gjør gull av grønne skoger”. Om norsk pressedekning av regnskogmilliardene og leseres reaksjoner

  • Kommentar: Erla

  • Silje Pileberg: Fortellingar om forsking

  • Kommentar: Dina

  • Anne Thurmann-Nielsen: Blogger som kunnskapskanal I klimadekningen

  • Kommentar: Dag


  • 11.45-12.15 Norsk klimapolitikk
  • Lise Rakner og Siri Gloppen: Klima og norsk bistandspolitikk

  • Kommentar: Laila og Marte


  • 12.15-13.00 Lunsj

    13.00-14.30 Objectivity, advocacy and climate journalism
  • Andreas Ytterstad: Objectivity and advocacy in global warming journalism: Scientific knowledge, local experiences and concern among students in Nicaragua, Nepal and Bangladesh

  • Kommentar: Harald

  • Harald Hornmoen: A Divided Climate. Press representations of the Norwegian petroleum report

  • Kommentar: Andreas

  • Discussion


  • 14.30-15.00 Pause

    15.00-16.00 Climate skepticism
  • James Painter: Comparative research on climate skepticism: methodological challenges

  • Dag Elgesem: Climate skepticism in the Norwegian blogosphere

  • Kommentar: Anne T-N


  • 16.00-17.00 Final discussion
  • Next steps

  • Publications

  • The project web page (climcross.org)


  • Middag



    Durban can 'connect-the-dots' to climate change with 350.org, 5 May


    http://www.climatedots.org


    CCS participates in the Global Teach - In 25 April


    The Global Teach-In will take place simultaneously in seven countries and multiple cities , starting on April 25th, 2012 at 12:00 Noon Eastern Daylight Time. This interactive and participatory event will include discussions by experts, grassroots activists and citizens at large concerned about developing solutions to policy problems and creating alternative institutions. The Teach-In will involve face-to-face deliberation, teleconferencing and an internet-based broadcasting network. Local teach-in groups already exist or are in formation. Participate by organizing a teach-in, joining a local group or listening to the broadcast.
    www.globalteachin.com

    Durban Event Details
    Date: 25 April 2012
    Time: 5-10 pm (South African Time)
    Venue: Room 602 (CCS Seminar room), 6th Floor, MTB, Howard College Campus, UKZN
    Speakers (Provisional)
  • Percy Nhau (The dark side of South African anti-globalisation: working-class xenophobia)

  • Ashwin Desai (Lessons from contesting Durban's COP17 climate summit about green (not red) civil society)



  • Patrick Bond talks to Hospice AGM, 25 April




    Fidelis Allen at the Social Theory Forum at Univ.Massachusetts/Boston, 19 April

    The Ninth Annual Social Theory Forum
    Event Start Date: April 18, 2012 - 8:30am
    Event End Date: April 19, 2012 - 5:00pm
    Location: UMass Boston Campus

    Please join the Sociology Department for:

    The Ninth Annual Social Theory Forum Conflict, Social Movements, and Social Change: Theory and Practice
    April 18 and 19, 2012
    University of Massachusetts Boston
    100 Morrissey Boulevard
    Boston, MA 02125-3393

    rikowski.wordpress.com
    Program & Registration details: www.umb.edu

    THE NINTH ANNUAL SOCIAL THEORY FORUM
    April 18th and 19th 2012

    Conflict, Social Movements, and Social Change: Theory and Practice
    Final Program

    WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18, 2012

    8:30-9:25 – REGISTRATION AND BREAKFAST (Ryan Lounge, Third Floor of the McCormack Hall, Third Floor of the McCormack Hall )

    9:25-9:30 – Opening the Conference
    Siamak Movahedi, Jorge Capetillo, Glenn Jacobs, & Darren Kew, the Conference Moderators

    9:30-10:00 OPENING STATEMENTS
    (Ryan Lounge, Third Floor of the McCormack Hall)
    Winston Langley, Provost & Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs
    Professor of Political Science and International Relations, University of Massachusetts Boston

    10:00-10:45: Distinguished Lectures

    Ryan Lounge, Third Floor of the McCormack Hall)
  • Lauren Langman, Loyola University of Chicago, and
    Valentine Moghadam, Northeastern University
    From Tahrir Square to Zucotti Park and Beyond


  • 11:00-12:30 Block Session 1: Global Perspectives on the Occupy Movements
    (Ryan Lounge, Third Floor of the McCormack Hall)

  • Langman, Lauren, Loyola University of Chicago and Lundskow, George, Grand Valley State University
    Down The Rabbit Hole to a Tea Party


  • Mutisi, Martha , African Centre for the Constructive Resolution of Disputes (ACCORD)
    Structures of Reconciliation: the Organ of National Healing in Zimbabwe.


  • Hagerty, Talia, University of Massachusetts, Boston
    ‘This is What Democracy Looks Like’: Strategic Nonviolent Conflict and the Case of Occupy Wall Street


  • Jeyapal, Daphne, University of Toronto
    Space, race and the protest of others


  • Callahan, Mary-Jo, Central Connecticut State University
  • From Chiapas to New York: The Zapatista Influence on the Occupy Movement


  • Moderator: Jorge Capetillo-Ponce, Sociology, University of Massachusetts

    Session 2: Conflict Resolution and Social Movement Theory
    (Harbor Art Gallery, First Floor of the McCormack Hall)

  • Jarul, Tufail, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi-India
    Kashmir Conflict and its Impact on the Seasonal Movement of the Bakarwal tribe and its future in the Valley of Kashmir


  • Kriesberg, Louis, Syracuse University
    Burdick, Samuel John, Syracuse University
    Roy, Beth, University of California, Berkeley
    Struggling on the Street and at the Table: How Social Action and Civil Dialogue can work together.


  • Stein, Andrew, The Lacanian group Apres Coup in New York City
    Occupy Wall Street: Politics As Usual Or Social Justice Event?


  • Charles W Ogg, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater
    Applying Relational Analysis to Labor as a Social Movement: The Sleeping Beast Awakes in Wisconsin.


  • Session 3: The Politics of Funding and the Pursuit of Social Justice
    (Sociology Conference Room, Wheatley 4th floor, room 22-23)

  • Diane Swords, Elizabeth Mount, Anya Stanger, Syracuse University


  • 12:30-1:30 Lunch

    1:30-2:20: Distinguished Lecture
    (Ryan Lounge, Third Floor of the McCormack Hall)
    Louis Kriesberg, Maxwell School, Syracuse University

    2:30-4: Block Session 4: The Arab Spring Movements: Where are they now and where are they going?
    (Ryan Lounge, Third Floor of the McCormack Hall)

  • Leila Farsakh, University of Massachusetts Boston (Moderator)


  • Lina Khatib, Program Manager for the Program on Arab Reform and Democracy, Stanford University


  • Tarek Masoud, Harvard University


  • Stuart Krusell, Associate Director, Office of External Relations, MIT


  • Session 5: Minority, Immigrant, and Gender Movements
    (Harbor Art Gallery, First Floor of the McCormack Hall)

  • Zulfiqar, Ghazal, University of Massachusetts, Boston
    Microfinance and the Promise of Social Change inSouth Asia


  • Dao, Loan, University of Massachusetts Boston
    ‘American Accent’: Counter-hegemonic Narratives of Undocumented and Non-citizen Asian (American) Youth


  • Jorge Capetillo-Ponce and Cedric Woods, University of Massachusetts at Boston
    Latino/a or Native American?Changing Patterns of Collective Identification Among the Maya K’iche in the United States


  • Ahmad, Shabab, CUHP, Dharamsala H.P. India
    Minority Status- Saga of Dispute: A Critical Review


  • Nair, Rashmi, Clark University, and Johanna ay Vollhardt, Clark University
    Solidarity between minority groups-voices from social movements in India


  • Moderator: Lorna Rivera, Women’s Studies,University of Massachusetts


  • Session 6: Nationalism, Autonomy, and Separatism
    (Sociology Conference Room, Fourth Floor of Wheatley Hall )

  • Subedi, Anand Prasad, University of Nepal Conflict Affected Internally Displaced Families in Nepal: A Special Reference to (1996-2006) Decade Long Maoist Insurgency


  • Ozugurlu, Sonay Bayramoglu,Gazi University, Ankara, Turkey.
    Keskin, Nuray Erturk, Ondokuz Mayis University, Samsun, Turkey.
    Local and Regional self government? / Autonomy? A Study on the Turkish Case


  • Obeni, Ehioboh Sonia,
    The Unifying Role of English in a Multicultural nation: The Case of Nigeria


  • 4:30-6:30 Block

    Session 7: Social Theory
    (Ryan Lounge, Third Floor of the McCormack Hall)

  • Kozlarek, Oliver, Universidad de Michoacán, Mexico
    The Humanist Turn: a Comparative Critque of Dehumanization


  • Solis-Gadea, Héctor Raúl, Universidad de Guadalajara, México
    The Challenges of Social Theory in the Twenty First Century


  • Margarita Palacios, Birkbeck College, Germany
    Hermeneutics and the Art of Disobedience: A critical reading of Ricoeur and Derrida


  • Arai, Tatsushi, School for International Training (SIT)
    Toward Functional Coexistence: Peace building in the Context of Mutual Non-Recognition


  • D’Arcy, Michael, UC Berkeley – UC San Francisco
    Shahid and the Mnay Struggles: Translating the Revolution and the Witness-as-Word


  • Moderator: Jorge Capetillo-Ponce, Sociology, University of Massachusetts


  • Session 8: Comparative Social Movements
    (Harbor Art Gallery, First Floor of the McCormack Hall)

  • Galanes Luis, University of Puerto Rico at Cayey
    Contemporary Social Movements: Lessons from theCaribbean


  • Muñoz-PROTO, Caolina, The Graduate center, CUNY and
    Opotow, Susan, John Jay College of Criminal Justice
    Justice, Activity and Narrative: Studying the World March for Peace and Nonviolence


  • Awodola, Bosede, Institute for Peace and Conflict Resolution-Abuja-Nigeria
    Social Movements and 2011 General Election in Nigeria: Case Study of Neighbor 2 Neighbor


  • Agarwal Ankit, University of Pune, India
    The Fade out of 2011 Indian Corruption Movement


  • 7:00-Dinner
    Location: TBA

    THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

    8:00-9:00 – REGISTRATION AND BREAKFAST (Ryan Lounge, Third Floor of the McCormack Hall, Third Floor of the McCormack Hall)

    9:00-10:30 Block

    Session 9: Digital Democracy, Social Media, and Movements I
    (Ryan Lounge, Third Floor of the McCormack Hall)

  • Ogenga, Frederic, Maseno University-Kenya
    Is Peace Journalism in the ‘war’ against terror? The Daily Nation and the East African Standard representation of Operation Linda Nchi in Somalia


  • Oravec, Jo Ann, University of Wisconsin at Whitewater
    The Protest Culture of the Midwest: Comparison of Pre-Internet and Internet-Enabled Imagery and Organizational Strategies


  • Rastogi, Divyanshu & Gupta, Gazal
    Social Media and Its Usage Trends: A Socio-cultural Perspective


  • Session 10: Digital Democracy, Social Media, and Movements II
    (Sociology Conference Room, Wheatley 4th. Floor, Room 22-23)

  • Clark, James,York University Toronto, Canada
    ‘Cyber Utopia’ readings of the Arab Spring: A neoliberal and pro-war fantasy


  • Mutisi, Martha, African Centre for the Constructive Resolution of Disputes (ACCORD)
    Countering State Repression through Digital Democracy: The Role of Electronic Media in Social Movements in Zimbabwe


  • Heisler, Jay, Saint Paul University, Ottawa, Canada
    Nonviolent Propaganda: Examples from Burma and Iran


  • Session 11: Labor, Civil Society and Culture
    (Harbor Art Gallery, First Floor of the McCormack Hall)

  • League, Panagiotis, Hellenic College
    Rewriting Unwritten History: Nationalism, Folklore, and the Ban of the Cretan Violin


  • Dorsey, James, Nanyang Technological University-Singapore
    Soccer as an Engine of Change and Assertion of Identity


  • Tucker, Terry, Middlebury College,Vermont
    The Book of Mozilla in Conflict Resolution


  • Usman, Mohammed and Ibrahim Badamasi, Babangida University, Lapai -Nigeria
    Religious Revivalism, Boko Haram and the Nigerian Society


  • Singh, Harneet, Gulati, Ashish, Kumar, Duru Arun, & Netaji Subhas, Institute of Technology, Dwarka,New Delhi, India
    Plight of Contract Labor in a Liberalizing Economy – An Indian Experience


  • 10:40-12:10 Block

    Session 12: Anti-Hegemonic Social Movements
    (Ryan Lounge, Third Floor of the McCormack Hall)

  • Binkley, Sam, Emerson College (Moderator)
    Social Movements and the Government of Intimacy: Expertise and the Intensification of Emotional Reciprocity.


  • Desai, Chandni, Institute for Studies in Education Center: Center for Urban Schooling, Ontario
    Supression of Social Movements: Challenges to the Road Map to Peace.


  • Feng, Wen, Beijing University, China
    Right against power: collective action of medical professionals in China.


  • Di, Jin Di, University of Saskatchewan-Canada
    Institutional Change and earnings of migrants and non-migrants in urban China


  • Session 13: Genocide, Ethnic Cleansing, and Torture
    (Harbor Ar tGallery, First Floor of the McCormack Hall)

  • Aryal, Sanjaya, Mahidol University, Bangkok-Thailand
    Transition without Justice: Flourishing Impunity in Nepal.


  • Soldz, Stephen, Boston Graduate School of Psychoanalysis
    Opposing Psychologist Complicity in Torture


  • Bhoi, Dhaneswar, Tata Institute of Social Sciences, India
    Issues of Atrocity Against the Dalits: A Study of Students.


  • Mutisi, Martha, African Centre for the Constructive Resolution of Disputes (ACCORD)
    Dealing with the aftermath of genocide through the Concept of Abanyarwanda: A Case of ‘Ethic Amnesia’ in Rwanda?


  • Moderator: Siamak Movahedi, Sociology, University of Massachusetts


  • 12:10-1:40 Lunch

    1:40-2:30: Distinguished Lecture
    (Ryan Lounge, Third Floor of the McCormack Hall)

  • Donald L. Carveth Professor of Sociology and Social & Political Thought, York University
    Training and Supervising Analyst Canadian Institute of Psychoanalysis Director Toronto Institute of Psychoanalysis
    “A Civil War in Every Soul”: Progress and Regress in the Struggle for Modernity


  • 2:30- 4:00 Block

    Session 14: Sustainability and Environmental Movements
    (Ryan Lounge, Third Floor of the McCormack Hall)

  • Allen, Fidelis, University of Kwa Zulu-Natal, South Africa
    Issues, Strategies and Achievements of Environmental Advocacy Groups in South Africa and Nigeria


  • Gecker, Whitney, University of Massachusetts-Boston
    Kromash, Kevin, Yale University
    Food for Thought: Using Habermas to Analyze the Marketing of Food in the U.S.


  • Medina, Fernando Campos, GSBC Graduate School Human Behaviour in Social and Economic Change
    The de-politicization of the socio-ecological conflict in Chile, When the pollution and the sustainability prevent to observe the human injustice


  • Dainius, Genys, Vytautas Magnus University, Kaunas-Lithuania
    The role of social conflict in civil society boundaries formation in the Baltic States


  • 4:00-5:00 Block

    Occupy Boston Documentary, Emerson College

    Directed by John Forrester
    (Ryan Lounge, Third Floor of the McCormack Hall)


    Molefi Ndlovu at Young Adult Review workshop of COP 17, 4 April

    South Durban Community and Environmental Alliance, 4 April




    Zero Fossil Fuels meeting, 20 March

    Dear all

    I have the pleasure to invite you to the First Meeting towards a Zero Fossils Durban
    next Tuesday, March 20th 2012 at 11:00 a.m.
    at the Centre for Civil Society, Memorial Tower Building, 6th Floor, Howard College, UKZN
    (map: maps.google.com)

    Agenda:
    1. Brief introductions of participants
    2. History of the Initiative
    3. Motivations of participants (What brings you here?)
    4. Next steps

    We are keeping it brief for the first meeting, so we can just get to know each other a bit and agree on some next steps together.

    In case you cannot attend the meeting at this time, you are invited to send me a written statement about your motivation to join the group and we will share it with everyone at the meeting and hope you can join us next time.

    Please be on time, because we have only an hour and a half scheduled for the meeting, so will need to start at 11:00.

    At 12:30 a talk about climate change narratives is scheduled in the same room and you are invited to stay for that if you wish: http://ccs.ukzn.ac.za/default.asp?11,61,3,2575

    best wishes,
    Kjell

    We are on a mission to end the fossil age. A clean and safe future for ourselves and for our children will be powered by 100% renewable energy, and fossil fuels will be left in the ground. Join LINGO, the Leaving it in the Ground Coalition!
    http://www.durbanclimatejustice.net/lingo/


    Patrick Bond reviews RDP for Zim opposition leaders, Nyanga, 16 March 2012



    MOVEMENT FOR DEMOCRATIC CHANGE
    POLICY COUNCIL WORKSHOP PROGRAMME
    Montclair Hotel; 15-18 March 2012





    Trevor Ngwane at Rosa Luxemburg anti-xenophobia panel, Johannesburg, 16 March



    Dear Friends of the RLS Southern Africa,

    We kindly invite you to our next Political Café to discuss the following topic:

    The Threat of Xenophobia in South Africa.

    With Shirley Gunn, Human Rights Media Centre and Trevor Ngwane, KZN University

    When: 12:00 to 14:00, Friday, 16 March 2012
    Where: Ramen Restaurant/Cafè, The Grove Square on Melle Street, Braamfontein

    Kind regards
    Dr. Armin Osmanovic
    RLS-Representative Southern Africa
    237 Jan Smuts Avenue
    2193 Johannesburg
    South Africa

    Phone 0027(0)114475222
    www.rosalux.co.za


    Patrick Bond on climate justice at Santa Barbara Global Studies Conference, 25 February





    CONFERENCE SCHEDULE – OVERVIEW

    www.global.ucsb.edu


    Patrick Bond on service delivery protests, Nadel AGM, Mthatha, 25 February



    NADEL NATIONAL CONFERENCE & AGM 2010
    “Threats to a constitutional democracy: perspectives and lessons for NADEL”

    Venue: Hotel Savoy and Conference Centre, Mthatha, Eastern Cape
    Date: Friday 24 February 2012 to Sunday 26 February 2012

    Patrick Bond on Service delivery failure and grassroots dissatisfaction

    CONFERENCE PROGRAMME

    CCS Research on Social Protest in South Africa

    Seminar on Protests in South Africa 2009 - 2011





    Press release on the NADEL Annual General Meeting held from 24 to 26 February 2012 in Mthatha

    The National Association of Democratic Lawyers (NADEL) held its Annual General Meeting (AGM) in Mthatha on the weekend of 24 February 2012.

    The theme of the AGM was “Threats to a constitutional democracy: perspectives and lessons for NADEL and the legal profession”. On the first evening of the AGM members of NADEL engaged in a thought provoking debate of NADEL’s role in influencing societal transformation and its positions on political issues and on government policy in light of its history and specifically its historical link with the liberation movement and the ANC. This debate is part of NADEL constant internal dialogue ensuring its role continues to adapt to the realities of the profession and the society in which its members function.

    NADEL had the privilege of having the Public Protector Thuli Madonsela addressing the AGM on the issue of corruption and of identifying means by which members of the profession can assist in curbing corrupt activities. NADEL further welcomed COSATU Secretary General Zwelenzima Vavi who addressed the AGM attendees on the meaning of democracy as it ought to be understood in South Africa. The continued existence of inequalities, especially of an economic nature, said Cde Vavi, is a sign that we do not yet have a fully functioning democracy. In his words:

    “We need an educated and engaged public and civil society that is capable of holding all institutions of governance accountable. However, the current socio-economic context disenfranchises the majority from being able to play this role meaningfully.”

    Cde Vavi expressed COSATU’s view, shared by NADEL, that the judiciary has a role to play in ensuring transformation takes place. In so doing they are enjoined to be as accountable as any other branch of government.

    Furthermore, Professor Patrick Bond addressed delegates on Service Delivery protests and grassroots dissatisfaction. He used the examples of the Mazibuko case on access to water and the court cases on access to anti-retroviral drugs. While these cases were successful they did not, as a result of the formulation of rights in the context of litigation, advance the cause of true mass-based transformation. NADEL has always held that litigation is not the best means by which to ensure transformative justice is achieved and valued Prof Bond’s analysis on this issue.

    Finally, the AGM was address by the Cuban Ambassador to South Africa H.E. Mr Hernández who addressed us on whether “Socialism can survive the Global Crisis of Capitalism”. The changes in the last few decades have led to the disintegration of the then existing socialist system to the existence of a few socialist countries whose challenge is to adapt in order to secure the gains of socialism within their borders. Cuba is applying just such measures. We look forward to continuing our exchanges with Cuba in order to keep updated on their progress.

    NADEL thanks the newly elected President of the Black Lawyers Association, Mr Mabunda, for gracing us with his presence throughout the AGM. It was a pleasure to have him and engage in constructive discussions with him on a plethora of issues.

    After the conference NADEL held its internal AGM. It began on Saturday, 25 February 2012 afternoon and ended on the morning of Sunday, 26 February 2012. The AGM adopted the following resolutions:

    “NOTING THAT

  • NADEL was formed inter alia to give a voice to the voiceless and the dispossessed;


  • The reasons for NADEL’s formation still remain and require our dedicated commitment;


  • NADEL’s commitment to international solidarity is just as important now as it has ever been, the challenges to progressive forces throughout the world continuing and there being a need to promote peace throughout the world;


  • There have been increases in attacks against the independence of our judiciary, but few steps taken towards its necessary transformation;


  • Corruption is eating away at the fabric of our society, depriving the majority of our people of the right to their fair share of the wealth of this country and is hampering fulfilment of the very goal the liberation movement sought to achieve;


  • NADEL has at its disposal numerous forums in which to make its voice heard and the means to contribute to the eradication of corruption and intensify the fight against poverty and inequality, including legislatures, municipal councils, Law Society meetings, Bar Councils, and the Courts;


  • Appreciating the challenge of choosing the appropriate forum in which issues must be raised by NADEL, the value of using all these forums to their full potential and promoting the use of forums like legislatures where discussions on policy with the elected representatives of the people are best held;


  • Condemning the systematic use of litigation as a means to undermine state initiatives by some members of our profession, its aggressive and antagonistic nature being more often than not ill-fitted for the necessary unified effort to find solutions for the plight of our people;


  • RESOLVING THAT

    Anti-corruption

  • NADEL condemns all forms of corruption and commits itself to disciplining any members who engage in conduct that could in any way put the integrity of public finances at risk, and to advocate the value of public monies in fulfilling the vision in the Freedom Charter for all;


  • NADEL joins forces with organisations that share similar objectives on all issues of common interest, such as fighting corruption, and campaigning together wherever possible, our unity being intrinsically linked to our ability to succeed;


  • Limitation of Freedom of Expression

  • NADEL commits to campaigning against the passing of legislation that limits freedom of expression and allows for the arbitrary suppression of information, and specifically any legislation inconsistent with the Constitution and the values enshrined therein;



  • Attacks on Democracy, the Judiciary and Freedom struggles

  • NADEL commits itself to promoting peace throughout the world and strongly support the fight of progressive forces everywhere and especially in Africa. In particular:


  • NADEL condemns the attacks on the judiciary in Swaziland and the continued interference with the judiciary by the Swazi Monarchy and its agents. The Swazi Monarchy’s disregard for basic human rights has gone unabated for too long;


  • NADEL calls upon the South African Minister of Justice to refuse to second South African Judges to act in Swazi Courts, in the face, notably, of the objections noted by Swazi legal practitioners;


  • NADEL supports the call for free and fair elections in Zimbabwe;


  • NADEL further urges SADC and the AU to better contribute to the promotion of peace and stability in the region. In particular, Nadel calls on SADC:

    1. to enforce the SADC treaty;
    2. to reconstitute the SADC tribunal and enforce its judgments;
    3. to ensure that the security of tenure of the presiding officers of the SADC Tribunal is guaranteed;


  • NADEL welcomes the release of one of the Cuban Five, René Gonzalez, but condemns the restrictions under which he is forced to live at present and calls for the release of all remaining Cuban political prisoners without conditions;


  • NADEL reaffirms its support for the Kurdish and Palestinian and other oppressed peoples’ struggle for self-determination and human rights;


  • Judicial Office

  • NADEL constitutes a “Submissions on Judicial Candidates” committee to streamline the submissions we make to the JSC, obtaining input from branches and members in sufficient time to ensure our submissions to the JSC are systematically made and focus on the potential of aspirants to ensure the bench becomes the progressive bench we need. The Committee will draft criteria for the selection of Judges to be applied by the organisation and promoted throughout the rest of the profession.


  • NADEL calls upon all Judges President and Judges Deputy President to engage with us, BLA as well as other progressive organisations in the profession, when deciding on Acting Appointments in their Courts, in light of the impact their choices have on aspirants to future possible careers on the bench and therefore to transformation of the bench in general;


  • Abolition of the status of silk

  • NADEL believes the conferment of the status of silk in the Advocates’ profession to be an elitist and antiquated feature of the profession, which militates against greater access to justice by the people of South Africa and calls for its abolishment”.


  • Furthermore, a new branch, the Tshwane branch, was recognised by the AGM.


  • A number of amendments to the NADEL Constitution were adopted, including an amendment extending the tenure of the National Executive Committee (NEC) of NADEL from one to two years and requiring that each branch be represented in the NEC. Two new portfolios were created as Office bearers of NADEL, namely a Projects and Campaigns Officer, to take responsibility for rights-awareness, pro bono and litigation-related interventions of NADEL and a Fundraising Officer, to take responsibility for the unique and challenging need to raise funds for NADEL’s projects and activities.


  • The AGM further decided that all “deployed members and all members of NADEL holding positions in governance structures of the profession (such as Bar Councils), however they acceded to these, must report on their activities within the relevant structures to the NEC, preferably on a quarterly basis.”


  • Finally, the new NEC was elected. The Office Bearers holding office for the next two years are:
    Gcina Malindi (Johannesburg), President of NADEL;
    Max Boqwana (Port Elizabeth), Vice-President;
    Faathima Mahomed (Durban), General Secretary;
    Ilan Lax (Pietermaritzburg), Assistant General Secretary;
    Asif Essa (Pietermaritzburg), Treasurer;
    Tony Thobane (Mpumalanga), Assistant Treasurer;
    Nokukhanya Jele (Johannesburg), Publicity Secretary;
    Patrick Jaji (Port Elizabeth), Projects and Campaigns Officer; and
    Mvuso Notyesi (Mthatha), Fundraising Officer.


  • The newly elected NEC looks forward to the year ahead, aware of its many challenges. At the forefront of NADEL’s minds is, as always, the transformation of our society to ensure all South Africans enjoy the rights entrenched in the Constitution, and the role it must play in contributing to the achievement of this goal.

    Issued on behalf of the National Association of Democratic Lawyers (NADEL)
    By Nokukhanya J. Jele, Publicity Secretary, NADEL NEC
    Tel: 011 263 8900 / 083 246 0377


    Patrick Bond debates WWF's Saliem Fakier at AIDC, Cape Town, 17 February




    Patrick Bond delivers New Zimbabwe Lecture, Harare, 15 February




    Patrick Bond banned from delivering New Zimbabwe Lecture 8 February

    Zim police stop KZN academic’s lecture!


    Leanne Jansen (The Mercury) 10 February 2012

    Durban activist and academic Patrick Bond has been barred from delivering an address as part of a series of lectures in Harare.

    Bond, who returns to SA on Friday, described on Thursday how riot police chased people away from the event, organised by the Movement for Democratic Change (MDC), on Wednesday.

    Bond would have spoken on the “global financial crisis, the discrediting of the neo-liberal ideology, and the failure of global climate governance at the COP17 (climate change conference in Durban last year)”, he said.

    He said the New Zimbabwe lecture series also faced bans in 2011 and was only saved when the MDC threatened to withdraw from the unity government.

    Bond was to deliver the first lecture of the 2012 series.

    “It is a sickening feeling to have simple rights of expression so blatantly repressed, but my experience is trivial when compared to the majority of Zimbabweans’ suffering. It is heartening that sufficient interest in the global financial meltdown and ecological crises exists to risk attempting the lecture again, hopefully next week. Another request for permission was supplied to the police,” Bond said.

    Charles Mangongera, the MDC’s director of policy and research, said he was “embarrassed” that Bond had travelled from Durban “only for him to be denied an opportunity to share his ideas”.

    According to Mangongera, the lecture series was a platform for critical thinking and debate on issues Zimbabweans were faced with daily.

    Mangongera said the police had been told of the seminar “more than a week ago” to satisfy the Public Order and Security Act.

    “Ideally we were not even supposed to notify them, as the act only refers to political gatherings and, clearly, an event of this nature is not a political gathering.”

    Mangongera said members of the organising team were called to the Harare Central police station on Wednesday and told that permission to hold the event had been denied because a “false address” had been provided.

    The Mercury phoned the police station on Thursday and spoke to a man who identified himself only as the station commander.

    When the incident, as told by Bond and Mangongera, was relayed to him, he responded: “Yes, so what do you want?”

    Asked why the lecture series was prevented from taking place, he laughed and put the phone down. - The Mercury
    http://www.iol.co.za/news/africa/zim-police-stop-kzn-academic-s-lecture-1.1231354



    The free flow of ideas is the hallmark of a proressive society
    Charles Mangongera (Zimbabwe Weekend Post) 10 February 2012

    The New Zimbabwe Lecture Series is a critical thinking and debating forum for ideas exchange and debate. The idea behind the series is to offer a platform for public debate on issues that confront Zimbabweans every day. The hope is that Zimbabweans can also learn from the experiences of other coutries and from time time eminent scholars and personalities are invited from abroad to share their thoughts and experiences. On Wednesday the 8th of February the series was to host a public lecture under the theme, ‘The Global Financial Crisis and its implications for the Third World: The case of Zimbabwe’. Billed to speak were renowned Zimbabwean academic, author and publisher, Dr. Ibbo Mandaza and well-known South African academic and author, Professor Patrick Bond.

    As the convenors of the New Zimbabwe Lecture Series we sent out invitations and flighted advertisements in the local press for the event. Here is the full text of the invitation that we sent out to the Zimbabwean public; “There is a saying that goes, “When Europe and America sneeze, the whole world catches a cold”. As the the United States and Europe grapple with the effects of economic recession and growth stagnation, the rest of the world including Africa have not been spared. Given the current state of globalisation and the integration of economies, the financial crisis has resulted in recession not only in the European Union and United States but across the whole globe. Markets in Asia and Africa have been adversely affected and economic growth is stuttering. Given these conditions, what are the policy options for Africa and Zimbabwe in particular? What are the policy implications and how feasible is the “Look East Policy” in the context of the emergence of China as a ‘superpower’? What lessons can Zimbabwe draw from the financial crisis and how can it safeguard itself from the economic shock? How will the financial crisis impact on internal political dynamics in Zimbabwe? For these and more questions, the public is hereby invited to this lecture”.

    As is required by the police under the obnoxious Public Order and Security Act (POSA) we sent them notification more than a week ago that we would be convening this lecture. Ideally we were not even supposed to notify them as the Act only refers to political gatherings and clearly an event of this nature is not a political gathering. But because of our previous experiences where we have had the police barring public seminars on the pretext that they were not sanctioned, we thought it prudent to notify them. We wrote the police more than a week ago but we never heard from them until the day of the seminar when they called one of our team members to Harare Central Police Station. There he was told by one Superintendent Gowe that the meeting would not go ahead. Gowe handed him a letter saying ‘my office regrets to inform you that it has been confirmed that you are using a false address, and hence your public lecture is not sanctioned’. My colleague protested that the New Zimbabwe Lecture Series was a bona fide platform that had held similar events before and that the police had been furnished with the same application details but he was was told off.

    An hour before the scheduled time of the event we received a call from the hotel where we had booked space for the event informing us that they had been instructed to lock up the space. They could not confirm to us whether the people who gave the instruction were police officers but could only say they were not in police uniform. We visited the venue so we could notify people that the meeting had been cancelled. By the time we got to the hotel there was a fully loaded police truck parked in the front. Officers in full anti-riot gear had been dispatched to cordon off the hotel entrance.

    We asked to address the people that had come for the seminar in order to inform that the meeting had been cancelled. The leader of the police team told us that he was under strict instruction not to let anyone address the people and warned that if we did he would promptly arrest us. By that time a big group of people had already gathered in the hotel lobby. We defied the him and addressed the people informing them that the police had barred the meeting.

    I took the leader of the group aside and I asked him how he genuinely felt about what the police were doing. I told him that this was an academic exercise and that the police had no right to stop such a meeting. He told me he saw nothing wrong with the seminar but was simply following instructions ‘from above’. “My friend, if I had a choice I would be at home with my family or maybe at the bar having a beer. But what can I do? I have been given orders and I cannot question them’, he told me.

    Later on as I drove home I felt embarrassed that we had flown a man all the way from Durban only for him to be denied an opportunity to share his ideas. Is this the Zimbabwean society we want to build? A society that fears ideas? How can we progress as a country if we close platforms for information exchange and debate? Countries that have progressed have done so on the backdrop of robust intellectual debate, from which new ideas emerge. Is the Zimbabwean political class so paranoid that it can send a whole truckload of police officers to bar Zimbabweans from talking about issues that confront them?

    The New Zimbabwe Lecture Series will be submitting another application for the same event next week. We will not rest until Zimbabweans get a genuine opportunity to search for answers to the problems that confront them every day.

    Charles Mangongera writes from Harare. E-mail feedback to cmangongera@gmail.com.



    Public meeting on financial and ecological crises banned
    Kubatana.net 9 February 2012

    Police yesterday banned a public meeting in the MDC’s New Zimbabwe lecture series which was to have been addressed by South African economist Patrick Bond, the topic being “Global Financial and Ecological Crises, and Implications for Third World Countries.”

    As one observer commented about the ban: “Hundreds had turned up for the meeting only to be greeted by baton wielding anti-riot police. Is this the state of the GNU we want?” The real question however is did we ever say we wanted any kind of GNU? The people of Zimbabwe didn’t vote for a compromise. The politicians decided to force one on us when none of them could get their own way.

    Meanwhile, “The Principals” (Robert Mugabe, Morgan Tsvangirai and Arthur Mutambara), signatories to the Global Political Agreement met for 2 ½ hours yesterday to “deliberate key issues affecting the country.”

    Amongst other things, they discussed elections, media reforms the land audit, and sticky issues like the Attorney General’s Act and Police Commissioner General Augustine Chihuri. The gist of the statement after the meeting? Yes, these are issues. And something should happen about them.

    Somehow, I wouldn’t have thought that “something” would have involved banning a public discussion. . .
    www.kubatanablogs.net
    Kubatana.net ~ an online community of Zimbabwean activists


    Book signing at Sandton Square Exclusives Books, 24 January 2012

    Patrick Bond at shop 111 (upper level), 5th&Maude, TUESDAY, 3:30-4pm







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