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Publication Details

Reference
World Cup News Volume 3 (2010) World Cup News Volume 3.  : -.

Summary
Durban going for gold: Plans for 2020 Olympic Games streets ahead, says city's manager
NIVASHNI NAIR 14 July 2010

Durban Mayor Obed Mlaba yesterday officially announced that the city will bid for the 2020 Olympic Games.

quote 'I can guarantee Durban will give SA the most cost effective Olympic Games' quote

Durban has already planned where it will build the aquatic and
equestrian centres, and the indoor sports area, as well as where it will
construct the Olympic village.

This places it ahead of other cities like Cape Town and Johannesburg,
which might also decide to bid for the games.

On Tuesday night, city manager Mike Sutcliffe contacted South African
Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (Sascoc) chief executive
Tubby Reddy to announce the city's intentions.

"We would be honoured to be the city chosen. We are not going ahead
because we want to come second . We are going ahead because we want to
win," Sutcliffe said.

He said the money for the project ‑ which will certainly amount to
billions of rands ‑ will not come from the city's coffers alone.

"It's very early to say how much it would cost for Durban to host the
Olympic Games but I can guarantee that Durban will give South Africa the
most cost‑effective Olympic Games," he said.

"From an economy point of view, we are growing faster than Cape Town and
Johannesburg . Our city is a very bright spot on a wonderfully bright
South African map. For me, it's got an incredible spark about it. It's a
great place to have in terms of climate and weather for an Olympics."

The city has been planning an Olympic bid since 2004. Officials
strategically moved to grab the attention of the International Olympic
Committee by successfully bidding to host the 123rd IOC session next year.

Durban has also identified where the different sports will be played for
the mega event that includes athletics, swimming, sailing, canoeing,
equestrian disciplines, cycling, and tennis.

"Our stadium is already built. Then looking at a swimming area, we will
add to that of course. We will need an equestrian facility, all those
stable facilities and places like that need a revamping anyway," said
Sutcliffe.

"We have started revamping the metro police facility. We need to look at
indoor areas. We built the arena at the ICC that can take a lot of those
smaller sports that might only need 15000 seats. So we have already
started putting in place facilities which can actually cope with any of
the infrastructure needs four years ago."

Sutcliffe said that should Durban win the bid, the city would build the
equestrian centre at The Stables, which is now a night flea market
within walking distance of the Moses Mabhida stadium.

The aquatic centre, a cycling arena and yachting marina would have to be
built from scratch.

"Our original plan was for the Olympic village to be at the old drive‑in
spot because it is near the stadium," he said.

The "old drive‑in" is a large, vacant lot near the beachfront.

However, Sutcliffe and his team will have to wait until July 2011 for
Sascoc to announce its choice of host city.

"The way the process works is that firstly, because of the scale of the
Olympic bid, the government must agree that the country is going to bid
for the event. Sascoc might then go through a bidding process or it
might decide that the argument is so compelling for one city, that it
might dispense with the bidding process," he said.

Efficient Group economist Marina Willemse said it was too early to
estimate how much the country would spend on an Olympic Games, but it
was likely to cost more money than it would generate.

Willemse warned that the perception that the cost would be low because
infrastructure was already in place, was false.



Slow response on Cup stadium plans:
Little sense of urgency as rugby eyes prime sites, writes Buddy Naidu

Buddy Naidu (Sunday Times) 18 July 2010

The conundrum of what to do with the 10 World Cup stadiums after the
tournament could have been resolved a year ago.

quote 'The parties should have sat down long before the soccer World
Cup' quote

SA Rugby Union (Saru) president Oregan Hoskins confirmed this week he
had written to the minister of sport, Makhenkesi Stofile, a year ago
expressing concern over the "impasse between some provincial unions and
local governments" in negotiating deals that would see provincial rugby
teams becoming anchor tenants at the stadiums after the World Cup.

Much has been made of the fact that some of the country's premier
stadiums ‑ such as Soccer City in Johannesburg, Moses Mabhida in Durban,
Cape Town Stadium and the Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium in Port Elizabeth ‑
would become white elephants after the soccer showpiece.

The government spent R16.9‑billion to build, renovate and upgrade the 10
stadiums used for the tournament .

Now cities are loathe to foot the multimillion‑rand bills to run the
stadiums at ratepayers' expense, and many feel that the country's top
provincial rugby sides have the necessary capacity, support and
expertise to become anchor tenants at stadiums in the major metropolitan
areas. Some municipalities are in negotiations with the leading rugby
and soccer teams in this regard .

In Johannesburg, talks between the owners of the Golden Lions franchise
and the City of Johannesburg have been confirmed. These could result in
the Lions moving into Soccer City, with Premier Soccer League games also
being scheduled there during the season.

The move could prove a masterstroke for the provincial franchise,
especially if they are to able to fill the 90000‑capacity stadium when
it holds Springbok test matches.

But getting the parties from other provinces to the negotiating table
has proved more difficult ‑ despite Hoskins's move a year ago.

"The parties should have sat down long before the soccer World Cup. It
is not in our national interest to leave things up in the air," he said
this week.

Hoskins said the provincial bodies were autonomous and that Saru would
only get involved "if asked to by its member unions or by the government".

"At this stage there is lots of speculation but I can tell you that the
government has not approached SA Rugby." He said Saru owned Test matches
involving the Springboks but "delegated" them to the provinces, who
earned gate takings.

Gillian Saunders, a director at Grant Thornton, which conducted business
plans for at least eight of the World Cup stadiums, said the key to
managing a solvent stadium was to host "multiple sports codes and other
multiple uses such as concerts, car shows, fairs and community events".

"As part of our research, we looked at the average stadium usage levels
around the world, which showed they were used between 25 and 35 times a
year. But the real challenge lies in how you fill the stadium and not so
much the amount of days its being used."

She said it was essential to get the private sector involved in the
running of the stadiums. Cape Town and Port Elizabeth, for example, have
already hired management companies.

"Generally, stadiums are not a return on investment. The first prize
would be to get an operating profit .. and I think many of these
stadiums have the potential to accomplish this."

Stofile's office was unable to confirm receipt of Hoskins's letter. The
Department of Sport's director of communication for the World Cup, Monde
Mkalipi, said the department was busy collecting "plans from all the
cities housing stadiums, in order to consolidate them by the end of the
year to ensure sustainability".

"All we can say now is that the management of these stadiums falls under
the various cities, some of which have appointed or are in the process
of appointing management companies."
naidub@sundaytimes.co.za




Fifa still rules Durban: Ambush ad laws apply till December
Arthi Sanpath Daily News 14 July 2010

Businesses in Durban and the rest of the country beware - even though
the World Cup is done and dusted, Fifa's strict anti-ambush marketing
laws will still be in place for the next five months.

This would effectively stop any "unauthorised" usage of terms in
relation to the World Cup in a manner which is "calculated to achieve
publicity for that trade mark and thereby derive special promotional
benefit from the event without the prior authority of the organiser".

It even stops anyone alluding to the event in advertising or marketing.
But there have been many such incursions already which appear to have
gone unchallenged.

The Merchandise Marks Act protects Fifa for six months from June 11 till
December 11.

However, Durban's anti-ambush marketing role ends on July 25 , and then
it will be up to Fifa and the official sponsors to enforce any breaches.

Dr Owen Dean, an attorney with Spoor and Fisher, which acts on behalf of
Fifa, acknowledged that even if a restaurant had a post-soccer World Cup
special meal offer, Fifa could take exception to it, and use the
Merchandise Marks Act to stop such advertising.

It was this law, said Dean, that Fifa used to tackle the high-profile
cases of ambush marketing that played out during the World Cup.

Among such cases in South Africa have been the Bavaria beer dress girls,
Kulula's ad of the "Unofficial National Carrier of the You-Know-What",
and Metcash Trading Africa, which sold lollipops marketed under the name
"2010 POPS".

One transport company in Durban was also caught out.

Dean said that company had had big vans with advertising that made
mention of the World Cup.

"However, a lot of people were creating websites that referred to the
World Cup, and people who placed adverts in papers referring to the
event," he said.

Dean added that post-World Cup he did expect some businesses to try to
use the World Cup as a "means of promoting their brand".

"The advertising doesn't have to say 2010 or World Cup, take Kulula.com
for example, they never actually used World Cup or 2010, but their
overall effect was to denote the World Cup," he explained.

The process is that Fifa writes a letter to the company to ask them to
stop, and then if they do not stop, then it would be taken to civil
court, Dean said.

In 2006 the then Minister of Trade and Industry, Mandisi Mpahlwa,
published a notice in the Government Gazette designating the 2010 Fifa
World Cup as a protected event in terms of section 15A of the South
African Merchandise Marks Act.

In the case of a first conviction, the person or company would be liable
to a fine not exceeding R5 000 for each article to which the offence
relates, or to imprisonment for a period not exceeding three years, or
to both a fine and imprisonment.

In the case of repeated offences, the maximum fine is set at R10 000 for
each article to which the offence relates, and the maximum period of
imprisonment is set at five years, again with the option of both a fine
and imprisonment.

City manager, Mike Sutcliffe, said that while some bylaws had been
applied only in certain areas during the World Cup, they would now be
applied more consistently across the municipality.

Bylaws
"We will still be enforcing bylaws, some of the bylaws don't apply
anymore, but for two more weeks ambush marketing will not be allowed,"
Sutcliffe said.

Jane Pillay of the Durban Chamber of Commerce, said she was not aware of
any ambush marketing cases in the city.

She added that while some business owners would "moan and groan" about
the bylaws, it was "unfortunately a stipulation that the country had had
to adhere to".

During the 2006 German World Cup, 3 383 infringements had been reported,
almost double that of the 2002 event.

There breweries including Heineken, Bavaria and Carlsberg used clever
advertising campaigns to get a slice of World Cup exposure.

Heineken distributed distinctive caps, albeit without logos, Bavaria
dished out orange Dutch trousers and Carlsberg handed out flyers with
the statement "Carlsberg. Part of the Game" at matches - all in
contravention of Fifa regulations.



Service delivery springboard Economic benefits 'overstated
Janice Roberts Sapa 14 July 2010

JOHANNESBURG: It will take three to five years to see the economic
benefits of the World Cup, a Human Sciences Re- search Council
specialist said yesterday.

It was, however, too early to tell how great these benefits would be, Dr
Udesh Pillay, head of research on service delivery at the HSRC, said.

The economic benefits the government projected three to four years ago
had, however, been overstated, he added.

Pillay, who has edited a book about the legacy of the 2010 World Cup,
said the tournament's legacy, in social terms, provided a very good
foundation for South Africa to address its development challenges as a
nation "in a more, rather than less, unified way".

South Africa had entered the World Cup as a divided and fractured
nation, evident in service delivery protests, high unemployment and crime.

"The World Cup was a rallying point for us to come together and be
proud," he said.

However, he warned that politicians should make sure this unique moment
in the country's history was not lost due to political squabbling and
ideological differences.

He noted that President Jacob Zuma had said he would use the tournament
to accelerate service delivery.

"There is a feel-good factor in the country now ... there is pride,
nation building and that gives SA a good basis to address challenges
like service delivery. There is a goodwill factor here, and we must use
this as a springboard when it comes to service delivery."

Pillay said he had failed to understand press reports that equated the
end of the World Cup with an outbreak of xenophobia. However, the lack
of service delivery did result in xenophobic attacks if foreigners
co-existed with locals and had access to livelihoods locals did not.

Turning to job creation, he said figures indicated the spectacle had
created 120 000 employment opportunities.

"Most of these jobs were in construction and were short-term ... but in
the context of our employment challenges, the creation of 120 000 jobs
is not insignificant."

However, there had been "big and bold" expectations a few years ago that
the tournament would help alleviate unemployment, Pillay said. "Once
again, economic benefits were overstated."

He put the tournament's contribution to gross domestic product at
between 0.2 percent and 0.4 percent, although economists had predicted a
contribution of over 3 percent four years ago.

Pillay estimated that 250 000 to 300 000 people had entered the country
to attend the World Cup and probably contributed R12 billion at an
average spend of R12 000.

Not everyone had had a profitable World Cup.

"The event was governed by Fifa regulations ... SA had to enter into all
sorts of agreements and those small-scale entrepreneurs who expected to
participate in the mainstream economy were marginalised.

"Some didn't cash in as expected and some are feeling terrible about it."

Pillay said crime had definitely decreased during the tournament.





Cup leaves trail of debt for homeowners
Mfundekelwa Mkhulisi, Luzuko Pongoma and Penwell Dlamini The Sowetan 13 July 2010

WHILE the rest of South Africa celebrates the hosting of a successful World Cup, hundreds of homeowners hoping to cash in on the tournament are left drowning in debt.

Homeowners renovated their houses and bought furniture, linen and cutlery, hoping they would host fans for the World Cup, but did not see a single fan the entire event.

WCS Big Five Promotions signed contracts with people who would act as agents, distributors and with homeowners.

Big Five was not accredited by Match nor were they affiliated to any tourism authority.

National distributors paid R29000, while agents paid a R9500 joining fee.

An estimated 500 national distributors registered with Big Five.

Each homeowner paid a refundable deposit of R500 with the hope of getting R750 a bed per night.

Bafana Masuku, of Orlando West, Soweto, was a registered national distributor who hoped to make a killing from the initiative.

“Our contracts created great expectations, so we spent money in anticipation of big returns . We were informed that there were people who had already booked and were waiting for our houses. We were pressured to do so.”

Masuku said he was left with piles of new linen, urns, and beds which he used to convince homeowners to buy into the idea.

They were expected to also provide breakfast and supper for guests.

According to the contract, a distributor was expected to get 200 beds and an agent had to get 50.

Distributors expected to get 12,5percent per bed while the agents hoped take home 6,5percent from the amount advertised for the house on the company’s website.

Big Five checked that houses met the required standards.

With a possibility of making more money once a home had been approved, people broke their banks to exceed the requirements. After approval, many splashed out more on their homes.

Big Five told homeowners they would receive 50percent of payment 14 days before guests arrived and the rest would be paid two weeks after the tournament.

Florida police spokesperson Vincent Mashiteng confirmed that a case of fraud has been opened.



The tourists never came
Mfundekelwa Mkhulisi 13 July 2010

VICTORIA Banzi is crying foul after she spent her savings to make her house “shine to attract tourists for the World Cup”.

Banzi, of Cosmo City, north of Johannesburg, spent more than R20000, which included insurance compensation she received after being involved in an accident in December last year.

She is one of the home owners recruited by CWS Big Five Promotions to provide accommodation to tourists.

“I spent so much money because there was an expectation created. WCS Big Five Promotions failed to deliver on their promises.

“Tourists never arrived and we were not told why. When I called their offices, there was no answer,” she told Sowetan yesterday.

“We were promised we would get half of the amount we would make 14 days before the start of the tournament,” Banzi said.

She said she was in arrears on her son’s university fees.

I thought homes would get guests
Penwell Dlamini 13 July 2010

WCS Big Five Promotions managing director Christo Maritz says things did not go according to plan during the World Cup.

This was after hundreds of home distributors, who invested thousands of rands in the company to accommodate tourists, were left in the lurch.

“We thought hotels would be full and people would then go to houses but that was not the case,” Maritz said yesterday.

“We placed a lot of adverts but things did not work out.

“ All those homeowners who paid deposits of R500 will get their money back at the end of the month as per agreement in the contract. ”

The refunds will not have any interest.

But he said those who were agents and distributors would not get any refunds.

Maritz could not say how much the company had lost from not getting any bookings.



My name has been tarnished
Luzuko Pongoma 13 July 2010


DEVASTATED: Maria Hlangwane

UHAPPY: Bafana Masuku in Orlando, Soweto, during the interview with Sowetan. PHOTO: MOHAU MOFOKENG

BAFANA Masuku of Soweto says his name has been tarnished, ruined and he is in debt.

He wants WCS Big Five Promotions managing director Christo Maritz to take full responsibility.

“He must call us and address us. His company must come out and take responsibility.”

Masuku said the bank repossessed his car last week after he failed to pay the balance.

“We have to negotiate a settlement because I spent more than R29000. I cannot stretch the deposit to cover my costs. What about my other resources that I used,” he said.

Masuku said Big Five had breached its contract with him.

“By fulfilling my contract I expected to be paid and I told creditors I would pay before the World Cup as I expected 50percent of my money from WCS Big Five as per contract.”

He said Big Five had not asked for his bank details which was also a sign that it had no intention to pay him.

Masuku said as a businessman his name was tarnished.

He said he recruited 108 home owners who paid R500 to Big Five.

Maria Hlangwane, who paid R9500 to be an agent for Big Five, said she was devastated.

“Some people would say we stole their money when they see us but I have explained to them what is happening,” she said.

She said she had recruited 40 people who paid deposits of R500 to WCS Big Five.



Fifa denies causing airport chaos Fifa jets caused the chaos
But no penalties for King Shaka culprits

Daily News Reporter 13 July 2010

DURBAN'S embarrassment at the blockage at King Shaka International Airport on World Cup semi-final day was caused by jets used by officials of tournament organisers, Fifa, it has been claimed.

But this claim, from a well-placed official, was rejected by Fifa today: "From Fifa side we can only say that it were definitely no Fifa planes causing the delays," said the media department.

It turns out that culprits in Wednesday's failures at Durban's new airport are unlikely to have the book thrown at them, as some officials have threatened.

This has emerged after South African officials have been engaged for five days in an awkward egg-dance after the fiasco, where passenger jets were turned back or delayed for up to four hours, infuriating those headed for the Spain-Germany match at Moses Mabhida Stadium.

Much of the blame initially fell on airport officials. But pilots who refused to budge from their parking spots at King Shaka then emerged as the main cause of the upset.

It has emerged now that it was executive jets used by Fifa that did it, parking and leaving the aircraft in bays, preventing other planes from landing.

At the time, an incensed Transport Minister, S'bu Ndebele, likened the act - without naming the errant pilots - as "parking in front of an ambulance".

Airports Company of South Africa (Acsa) official, Colin Naidoo, described it as "a bit like hogging the disabled parking zone at a shopping centre".

Officials have said about eight pilots refused to heed instructions to discharge their passengers and skip on to Durban International to park and wait until the end of the game.

This caused passenger jets to turn back or remain in holding patterns, burning tons of extra fuel as they waited for clearance to land.

What officials carefully avoided saying was that it was Fifa aircraft that clogged the new airport. They knew all along who the culprits were, but stoically refused to identify them in spite of an avalanche of criticism and passenger-fan anger.

Fifa today referred further inquires to South Africa's Department of Transport.

A source in the know also rejected a pilot's accusations blaming the design of the new airport. "Even a two-seater plane could bring an aircraft to a halt if it was parked in the wrong place," said one very senior official, well-acquainted with what happened.

King Shaka saw 205 flights that day, said the official, who defended airport and civil aviation officials as having done nothing wrong.

The delicacy was that the government felt it had to take the flak, and obfuscate about the culprits, because it was considered inappropriate for a host government to take on its special guest which had brought the world to South Africa. It was their fault, sources say, and no one else's.

There had been other factors, a sequence of events, according to Acsa.



Red card for Fan Fest
Charmel Bowman and Aarif Saib Sunday Tribune 11 July 2010

Fifa Fan Fest traders are relieved the World Cup ends today, because it
means they can stop losing money.

Some say they have been threatened with eviction for not paying the
second instalment of fees for the right to trade at the beachfront. They
have not earned enough money to do so and have had to throw away stock
they could not sell.

While the Durban fan park has been hailed as the best-attended in the
country, it did not shower benefits on the angry traders, who have
incurred huge losses and are not sure how their families will survive
the coming months.

The stall holders claim this was because of bad location, lack of
marketing of the food court, and the inefficiency of Black Pepper
Consortium, the company appointed to manage the event.

The food court was located towards the end of the beach, with little
signage indicating where the stalls were.

Abdul Khan said he regretted the decision to trade as he has incurred
such a huge loss.

He said the stalls were on the promenade at the start of the cup, but
were moved a few days later to the back of the fan park. Because of
this, sales had been very low on most days.

"I have made as little as R25 trading an entire day. On other days I
haven't made a sale at all. I am operating at a total loss and am lucky
to make a few hundred rand on a good day."

He said stall holders had suggested ways to attract customers, but had
been told these were not viable.

"None of the ideas was taken into consideration. We have sent letters to
city officials, but have yet to receive a response."

He said stock was being thrown away on a daily basis, further increasing
his loss.

"I earn my living selling food at flea markets. I have to work twice as
hard after the World Cup to recover my huge loss trading at the fan
park. I have four children and a wife to support," he said.

He has only paid R10 000 as the first deposit and had to pay the other
R10 000 last week. However, he said he was unable to pay the money.

"The managing company, Black Pepper, threatened to evict us this week if
we didn't pay. The manner in which we have been treated is not fair. We
have not generated enough income and they still expect us to pay.

"When we applied, we were told to prepare for an average of 25 000 fans
every day. Well, we are yet to see those fans. The fan park may have
been a success, but because of where we were situated, all those fans
bypassed us."

Dhirren Ratthan, manager of a food stall, said losses had exceeded his
profits. "My sales average R400 to R500 a day. My losses average R1 000
to R2 500 a day. When you add the R30 000 rental fee, I walk away with
crippling losses."

Ratthan is angry over rental disparities. "You pay R20 000 to sell one
item and R30 000 for a larger stall size. (But) the stalls are the same
size and the restriction to sell one item in the R20 000 category is not
enforced. I have paid R10 000 extra for nothing."

Ratthan said the stall holders still owed 50 percent of the rental and
had no intention of paying. "The municipality and Black Pepper need to
compensate us for our losses, or we will explore our options, which
include going to court."

George Stainton, commercial director of Black Pepper, said contractually
a few of the traders were positioned to trade on the promenade, with
most being positioned in and around the food court.

"Of the vendors relocated, with the exception of one, all accepted and
signed an addendum to their original contract, indicating the
renegotiated terms and conditions," he said.

Stainton said the relocation to the central food court area, which was
considered a quieter trading area, came with a renegotiated rental.

He said although some traders were granted temporary trading areas
within the Fan Fest, this was stopped by authorities due to health and
safety requirements. He said vendor rights fees were payable in two
instalments, the first to secure a position and the second during the event.

"The application process was advertised by public tender and all
interested parties submitted their proposed rights fees. We have reached
agreement with most of the vendors and where we have not reached an
agreement, we advise that these vendors are in breach of their agreement
and Black Pepper Consortium will take the necessary steps to resolve
outstanding issues."

Meanwhile, restaurants outside the fan park in North Beach have seen an
increase in business during the World Cup.

Yunus Patel, owner of Wrap It Up Caffe, said business had increased,
especially on match days.

Junaid Patel, manager of My Diner, agreed. "Business has been booming on
match days, with the supporters filling up my restaurant."

He said the supporters loved chicken tikka, curries and bunny chows.

Andreas Schreiter, manager of Café Jiran, said business had doubled on
match days.

Speaking about the positioning of the food court, the city's Strategic
Project Unit's Vivienne Holden said, "The location is historical -
Noddy's food outlet was positioned in this area for many years and the
Fan Fest outlets remained in this location. The Durban Fan Fest boasts
the highest number of visitors of any of the Fan Fests in the country -
the marketing speaks for itself."

When asked if the city would use Black Pepper Consortium for other major
events, Holden said, "The municipality will continue to abide by the
standard tender procedures."



Fan Fest traders told to pay, or else
CHARMEL BOWMAN Sunday Tribune 11 July 2010

A CLASH between Fan Fest traders and Black Pepper Consortium, which
manages the event, has turned ugly with traders saying they got letters
yesterday claiming they had not paid stall holder fees and might be
barred from trading today.

Trader Abdul Khan said Black Pepper was using "bullying tactics" to get
stall holders to pay the remainder of their fees allowing them to trade.

Vendors at the fan park paid between R20 000 and R30 000 to trade,
depending on the stall size. Half the amount was paid at the beginning
of the event, with the second instalment due this week.

But they said business had been so bad during the month-long event that
they had not made enough money to pay the second instalment.

They said this was because the food court was at the back of the fan
park, out of the way of foot traffic, with no signage to attract customers.

"Some days I don't make a sale. I have to throw stock away every day and
as a result am running at a loss," said Khan.

"This has been the worst month of trading I have ever had, even though
thousands of fans have visited the fan park.

"Black Pepper claims we are in breach of contract, but our contracts
stipulated that we were going to be trading on the promenade and would
be operating from 10am to (midnight). However, the fan park has only
been opening at 5pm recently, limiting our trading hours, and we are
right at the back of the fan park."

He said that nearly half the traders had not paid the outstanding
amount, with some negotiating a reduced amount, as they could not pay in
full.

Responding to these allegations, George Stainton, commercial director of
Black Pepper, said they were following the correct procedures of law
within their contractual rights.

"Claims that we are evicting people and threatening them with violence
is untrue. Every vendor is trading, but we are acting within our rights
regarding the money that is outstanding.

"(Most) of the traders have paid and are ecstatic with business.

"The vendors tendered to trade here and signed a contract, which people
seem to be forgetting," he said.

The Durban Fan Fest had had the most visitors in the country, with "the
food and beverages forming a part of the experience enjoyed by visitors
and poor trading performance cannot be ascribed to this", Stainton said.

"Outdoor event trading is termed as high risk due to the
non-prescriptive conditions and attendance. We consider each vendor
arrangement private and confidential and have reached agreement with the
majority of the vendors.

"With the exception of the renegotiated rentals, no vendors will be
compensated as there are no grounds for compensation.

"Black Pepper Consortium have engaged with all vendors verbally and in
writing, ensuring that all trading is conducted within the prescripts
and conditions set by the eThekwini Municipality, as the sponsors of
this event," he said.



Virginia got 'em to the game on time
CHARMEL BOWMAN VIVIAN ATTWOOD
11 July 2010

A SNARL of aircraft circled the sky above King Shaka International
Airport on Wednesday evening before having to abandon landing and leave
the airspace for other airports. There were howls of disappointed
indignation as it dawned on more than 1 000 sports fans that they would
miss the clash between Germany and Spain.

While the wheels fell off, metaphorically, air traffic control staff at
King Shaka's "baby sister", Virginia airfield, calmly handled the
overspill of smaller jets, ensuring that their A-list passengers made it
to Moses Mabhida Stadium.

When the Sunday Tribune visited the airport in Durban North on Thursday
morning, staff showed little sign that they had uncomplainingly worked
overtime until well after 2am. While weary jetsetters drooped in the
departure lounge, awaiting clearance for takeoff, the remarkably
fresh-looking airport manager, Glen Bryce, modestly brushed off his
team's achievements.

"It has been tremendously exciting," he said. "More than 130 light
aircraft, mostly domestic, landed at the airport before the Spain versus
Germany clash. We generally average about 10 flights a day.

"We did our best to help with the overflow from King Shaka International
Airport and accommodate planes here if they were small enough. Most
flights were from within South Africa, with only a few German aircraft
landing here."

Bryce said they were delighted all their passengers made it in time for
the match.

"Things were really hectic, with everyone desperate to get to the game,"
he said. "Because we are quite close to the stadium, planes cannot land
45 minutes before kick-off, in line with aviation and Fifa regulations.
Despite this we still managed to assist everyone, something we are very
proud of."

Bryce said several business jets had radioed in to request permission to
land at Virginia, but had to be turned away.

"We even got a call from a prominent Israeli businessman who wanted to
land a Challenger 605 here because King Shaka was full. Sadly, we could
not accommodate him, because of the length of our runway. His craft was
simply too big to stop in time.

"We felt we could not turn prominent people from all over the world away
at this special time."

The airport manager said the problems at King Shaka were logistical.

Lessons
"There were too many aircraft in the air. There are four important
checklists every aircraft must adhere to before they can take off. That
is a clearance code, authorisation flight number, a flight plan and a
slot time. What went wrong is that too many planes wanted to land
without having an allocated time slot."

While Tribune reporters scanned the crowd for famous faces, one man
stood head and shoulders above others. When approached, security
surrounded him. He turned out to be Lee Andrew Bynum, a professional
basketball player for the Los Angeles Lakers.

Approached for comment on the World Cup and his experience, Bynum
mumbled, "Sorry, I'm too tired to speak", before turning away. He didn't
manage to elude our cameraman, however. It's hard to hide when you
measure more than 2.1m.

The World Cup experience has also been enjoyed by pilots, who have
interacted with Hollywood's finest. Stefan Viljoen, operations manager
for Bateleur Air Charter, said they had been extremely busy transporting
international tourists and celebrities.

"A colleague transported Paris Hilton to Sabi Sabi this morning. Another
transported Leonardo diCaprio back to Johannesburg. Earlier this week
Hilton, DiCaprio and Charlize Theron met for supper at Sun City and we
had to transport them there as well."

Pilot Dale Tute counted meeting DiCaprio in the lounge after a flight as
the highlight of her World Cup experience.

"He was very shy, but waved and smiled when I greeted him," she said.

Klara Fouche of Starlite Aviation confirmed that Nicky Oppenheimer's
helicopter was parked on their runway. Oppenheimer reportedly flew in
with former US secretary of state Henry Kissinger.

The old Durban International Airport, where it was rumoured private jets
were parked, although officially closed, was bustling, with army
personnel manning every gate. When asked whether celebrities had used
the landing strip, an officer confirmed he had seen famous faces, but
was not allowed to divulge further details.



SA 2010 World Cup has lowest crime levels
rpm 9 July 2010

The level of crime around the South African World Cup had been
incredibly low, organising committee chief Danny Jordaan said in
Johannesburg on Friday.

"It had been perhaps the lowest of any World Cup," he said at a media
breakfast on the eve of the final match of the South African tournament.

"The police were efficient and the special courts were effective... the
question is how do we maintain this?"

Jordaan said many people were asking him how South Africans could make
the positive experiences of the last 30 days a permanent feature of the
country.

It was aspects like the crime control and "swift justice" that were the
type of things that should be carried through, he said.

"It is a challenge to us all in South Africa to maintain that... we have
had an image make-over for South Africa and the continent of Africa.

"We have succeeded in re-branding and repositioning this country."

The proof that South Africa could be efficient and could deliver on its
promises was there. This was the country that the rest of the world
wanted to interact with and invest in.

"As a country we are incredibly blessed to be able to have the
opportunity to build a new nation," Jordaan said.



'Private jets hogged King Shaka'
Gill Gifford 8 July 2010

Airports Company South Africa (Acsa) CEO Monhla Hlahla has told Talk Radio 702 presenter John Robbie on Thursday morning that much of Wednesday's chaos at King Shaka International Airport was caused by private jets that had landed, parked and then refused to fly out again.

This meant that there was not enough space for scheduled incoming flights to land on time.

Asked directly by Robbie if the VIP jets had been allowed to stay parked and not move off, Hlahla responded: "Yes that is true and that, partly, you can't blame your customer in the African culture."

She said Acsa had been faced with a challenge as to how to deal with 'special VVIPs' and the 'special care' they needed in conjunction with their reluctance 'to follow the rules'.

"So you can't blame the customer in African culture... so does this mean your other customers have to go and twiddle their thumbs? Is that what you are saying?" Robbie asked.

Hlahla responded that she had not differentiated between people when using the term 'customers', and that work was done to accommodate everyone at the airport.

She said the hiccups had come about as a result of a combination of bad weather and a sudden onslaught of arrivals for Wednesday night's big game.

This had taken 'a lot of co-ordination and special focus'.

"And you didn't know about that?" Robbie asked.

"A lot of people were waiting and among them some very important people. We need to learn to co-ordinate this. The chief and main thing is that we keep everybody safe, and we did that," Hlahla said.

"Why did you not tell those people 'If you don't move, we will arrest you'?" Robbie challenged.

Hlahla said Acsa officials had attempted to manually move the VVIP jets themselves.

"But the challenge is 'where to', because the airport is already full. We need to find a way to oil that," she said.

This breaking news flash was supplied exclusively to iol.co.za by the news desk at our sister title, The Star.



'If Acsa had a heart...'
By Botho Molosankwe

Some German and Spanish fans who flew all the way from their countries to watch the semi final game in Durban shouted and screamed at the Kulula.com cabin crew staff with frustration as they realised that they were going to miss the game.

A 37-year-old man broke down in tears when looking at his devastated children crying over missing the semifinal game they had been looking forward to.

Marlene Swanepoel from Pretoria and Kiran Singh were some of the people who were caught in the chaos created by the lack of space at King Shaka International Airport.

Singh, his 11-year-old twins, 14-year-old son and two nephews aged 16 and 21 left Durban on Wednesday morning to meet the former Liverpool star John Barnes in Johannesburg and also get a few autographs.

They were to board the 18:25 flight to Durban that would arrive an hour later. Singh had bought match tickets that cost R1 750 each but they never got to watch the game as they only arrived at King Shaka only five minutes before the end of the game.

"We were devastated; we had waited a whole month for the semi-final. We missed everything... we saw nothing. I cried when I looked at my crying children. If Acsa had a heart, they would give us tickets to the final. We don't want money, we just want to go and see the game," Singh said.

Swanepoel boarded at OR Tambo International Airport and wanted to take her 4-year-old son to Durban to visit his grandparents before the schools re-opened.

"We boarded the 16:15 flight but circled over Harrismith for an hour because the captain said there was no parking space at King Shaka and said we would have to go back to refuel.

"We got back to Johannesburg after 8pm and there were Dutch and Spanish soccer fans who were furious and kept screaming at the hostesses.

"They said they came specifically for this game and wanted to know whether they would get a refund. My baby was crying and I also cried because I was disappointed as I was looking forward to seeing my parents," Swanepoel said.

This breaking news flash was supplied exclusively to iol.co.za by the news desk at our sister title, The Star.



Fans 'will not be reimbursed'
Agnieszka Flak 8 July 2010

Hundreds of soccer fans missed the World Cup semifinal between Germany and Spain on Wednesday after chaos at the airport in Durban delayed their landing or forced planes to turn back, local media reported.

The airport disarray was a rare blemish on the so far successful hosting of the World Cup, held on the continent for the first time, which has gone without any major glitches.

Some VIP planes, which were supposed to land at the new Durban King Shaka International airport and later park at an old airport some 60km away, would not move, causing the chaos, 702 Talk Radio reported, citing the Airports Company South Africa (ACSA) as saying.

Five planes were forced to turn back to Johannesburg and Cape Town, while others landed after being delayed by several hours, leading to fans missing all or most of the mouth-watering clash between the two European soccer giants.

ACSA said passengers would not be reimbursed because the planes took off and landed at an airport and because only a small portion of the ticket price was paid to the company.

Stranded passengers, who spent thousands of rand on flight and match tickets, were outraged by the situation and some threatened to sue the airports company for their losses.

"We have done well up to now but today is a disgrace," one outraged fan told the radio station.

"The fact that one of our airports does not even know what its capacity is, is quite pathetic," said another.

Rich Mkhondo, spokesman for the World Cup local organising committee, told Reuters there was nothing the organisers could do about the incident now.

"Unfortunately, these kind of things happen. We will be meeting with ACSA later today to make sure this doesn't happen again during the final," he said.

Netherlands face Spain in the World Cup final at Soccer City in Johannesburg on Sunday. - Reuters



ACSA detail events leading to King Shaka International Airport congestion
ACSA 8 July 2010

As part of the preparations for the 2010 FIFA World Cup, Airports Company South Africa (ACSA), together with Air Traffic & Navigation Services (ATNS), provided a runway slot allocation system which allowed a set number of aircraft movements per hour in and out of each airport.

Up until yesterday, the system had been working perfectly, with the scheduled airlines and private operators adhering to the protocols and additional directives issued.

A series of events unfolded which culminated in the airspace congestion situation as witnessed yesterday at King Shaka International Airport:

Firstly, the Central Airspace Management Unit system (CAMU), operated by ATNS, failed between 4am and 8am, which resulted in ATNS manually allocating slots on a first come first served basis. Private operators took advantage of the situation, in certain instances taking up slots which were not allocated to them, thus beginning the domino effect.

Secondly, between 05h00 and 12h00, King Shaka International Airport (KSIA) experienced lower than planned and expected arriving aircraft traffic. Aware of the game in the evening and the higher than normal air traffic volumes expected, ACSA KSIA management requested prioritisation of all flights with slots carrying soccer fans and FIFA family due to attend the semi final soccer match in Durban.

Thirdly, as traffic was beginning to pick up, weather related restriction were imposed at around noon time, which also led to a further 20 minute delays. The resultant increase in traffic volume in the Durban airspace was so high such that ATNS decided at around 14h00 to impose airspace restrictions. This meant that no aircraft could depart to KSIA for 30 minutes.

Fourthly, following the lifting of the restrictions, at around 17h00 eight private aircraft operators who had landed at KSIA failed to adhere to the directive to reposition aircraft at other airports outside of KSIA. This made it impossible for other aircraft to fly into the airport as aircraft parking bays were occupied.

In the end, six scheduled flights, (SAA 575, SA 1339, Kulula MN603, Kulula MN641, BA 6313 and BA 6307) were forced to either return to base or divert to other airports, preventing about 600 passengers from being in Durban for the semi-final match.

Monhla Hlahla, Managing Director of ACSA, said: “Since June 11 2010, our industry facilitated over 32 500 aircraft movements through-out the ACSA network of airports. This facilitation was undertaken with pride and passion to serve our country, region and 2010 FIFA World Cup fans. We regret that this incident has dampened the jubilant mood in the country and stained the impeccable efforts that went into preparing and facilitating air traffic during this prestigious tournament. I apologise to all South Africans, and most importantly, all fans that missed the opportunity to attend the semi-final in Durban.”

Hlahla added that the Company is currently reviewing all pertinent facts around this matter and the legal implications and will take whatever steps necessary once all findings have been considered.

Statement By – Solomon Makgale | Group Manager Communications | Corporate Office | Airports Company South Africa



Furious fans miss semifinal
SAPA 7 July 2010

* Packed King Shaka airport turns away fans
* Airport overwhelmed by VIP plane rush

Johannesburg - Five plane-loads of football fans headed for the World
Cup semifinal between Spain and Germany suffered severe delays on
Wednesday at Durban's King Shaka International Airport, forcing some
fans to miss the match.

Four planes from Johannesburg and one from Cape Town were delayed after
the airport was swamped by arrivals, airport operations director Bongani
Maseko told The Associated Press.

He said the problem was caused by the large numbers of supporters
arriving at the airport for the World Cup semifinal.

All five planes were eventually allowed to land and given a police
escort to the stadium, though too late for many fans to see Spain's 1-0
victory.

Maseko apologised to supporters who missed the game. - Sapa-AP



On a night when durban was supposed to shine, city will be remembered for wrong reasons
WHAT A SHAMBLES

Mercury Reporters July 08, 2010

It was supposed to be the climax to a fantastic World Cup in Durban, but
turned out to be as chaotic as the running of the bulls in Pamplona - at
least at King Shaka International Airport.

Disappointed fans, who had paid thousands to attend the match, the media
and VIPs and politicians were caught up in delays as the airport
struggled to cope with the increased air traffic, including the private
jets of the rich and famous, and flights were diverted away from Durban.

SA singer Danny K, who was to sing at the Durban Fan Fest, was due to
take off from Joburg at 5pm, but only landed in Durban at 10pm.

The figures at last night's match gave the lie to the Airports Company
of SA's initial attempts to play the situation down.

Just 60 960 people watched the match - the lowest of the seven Durban
matches - one that was sold out, and touted to be the "real" final.

From the Washington Post's Steven Goff (see Page 10) to the twitterati,
the comments until early evening were overwhelmingly positive.

But in a short space, frustrated fans, who saw their hopes of watching
the Spain-Germany semi-final dashed, vented their frustration on social
networking sites and radio.

A tourism expert said the chaos would cast Durban in a bad light, but
that the city should get something positive out of it.

"This morning it was announced on TV that we would bid for the Olympics,
so we have to learn our lesson from this."

A riot almost erupted on a 1Time flight from Cape Town to Durban as fans
rushed towards the cockpit when the captain announced that their flight
was being redirected.

Durban soccer fan Jay Moodley said the situation in the plane became
"very tense".

The flight had been scheduled to leave Cape Town at 4.45pm, but left
about 30 minutes later.

Near Port Elizabeth the captain announced that they were being re-routed
to Joburg.

"There was almost a riot on the plane and about 10 foreigners rushed
towards the cockpit. The captain told them that they would be arrested
if they did not sit down. Things were very tense."

About 20 minutes later they were told that a spot at King Shaka had
opened up and that the plane would land in Durban, albeit at 8.50pm -
two hours late.

"People rushed off the plane and were trying to make it to the stadium
in time for the second half. There was a huge anticlimax when we landed
and people were giving Durban the thumbs down."

Airlines said they would demand answers from Acsa.

Up to 40 private aircraft were parked at the former Durban International
Airport and sources said Virginia Airport's parking bays were eventually
called into use, but questions remained as to why Acsa had allowed
private aircraft to park at King Shaka airport for the match.

"This is a massive disappointment in terms of planning and I am very
eager to hear how it happened," said Kulula.com CEO Gidon Novick, who
had three flights diverted to OR Tambo, and more than 500 passengers who
missed the match.

Shannon Kalil, from Houston, Texas, whose son-in-law, ardent Spanish
supporter Jean-Pierre Baizan - was stuck at OR Tambo - said: "People
have spent so much to follow their teams and now they can't land at the
airport.

"This is a huge let-down."

Allegations were also rife that preference was being given to private
VIP aircraft.

Mango CEO Nico Bezuidenhout said airlines had worked to resolve the
issue and get people to the game.

An angry Cape Town woman with a ticket to the match cancelled her flight
and forfeited her chance to watch the match because her flight would
have landed well after kickoff.

"I can live with it because I can go home and watch there, but Cape Town
airport is full of Spanish and German supporters who are stuck."

At about 5.30pm, Acsa spokesman Colin Naidoo said there had been a
20-minute closure of airspace around the airport earlier in the
afternoon as too many flights were trying to land.

Asked why there was a problem, he said: "I don't know, but we are now
catching up with delays."

Air Traffic and Navigation Services Africa spokeswoman Anna Sanfilippo
said, however, the airspace had not been closed.

"We had to implement a ground delay programme (which prevents aircraft
from landing and other inbound-flights from taking off) because of
insufficient parking."

"I can't keep a plane in the sky if there is no parking," she said.

However, Acsa maintained there was enough parking space.

Naidoo said the old Durban International Airport was used to cater for
scores of chartered planes landing ahead of the match and that there had
been 30 to 40 chartered planes parked at the old airport.

A source said several light aircraft began landing at Virginia Airport
around 6.30pm.



Packed King Shaka airport turns away fans
Airport overwhelmed by VIP plane rush
By Wendy Jasson da Costa 7 July 2010

Hundreds of soccer lovers who were hoping to fly to Durban for the
semifinal between Spain and Germany are still stuck at airports around
the country and could not make it in time for them to watch the match.

What was supposed to be the end to a brilliant world cup streak for the
city turned into a nightmare when King Shaka International airport could
not accommodate anymore aircraft as its parking area was full.

Frustrated fans vented their frustrations on twitter during the match.
This is what some of them had to say.

AshleyBann

I am f*****g convinced we got shack-dwellers running the bloody Durban
airport! I wonder how many paying fans will not get to see the game??



That's it folks, so what now?
Colleen Dardagan, Suren Naidoo & Bronwyn Gerretsen 8 July 2010

THE World Cup has come and gone for Durban - and now it is time to ask,
what now?

Will Durban return to the old or will residents and visitors continue to
reap the benefits of hosting the beautiful game ?

City manager Michael Sutcliffe told The Mercury last night: "The World
Cup has given us momentum, it has helped to create a better environment
to work."

At the forefront of Durban's World Cup planning was how it would benefit
the city.

The city would continue to focus on poverty and unemployment, Sutcliffe
said.

Durban's port would also continue to receive attention, including the
need for a decision on a dug-out port.

"We have a 20-year vision and want that area to ensure we develop a
world-class port," Sutcliffe said.

Moreover, Durban would still "put up its hand" for international and
national mega and mid-events.

The city would host the transplant games, the Baptist conference and was
also looking at the master and veteran games.

"These type of events have huge benefits for the city and we are
deciding which of those events we need in the city," said Sutcliffe.

On Durban's mulitimillion-rand revamped promenade, Sutcliffe said it had
brought the city together again.

"Our beachfront is the most non-racist, non-sexist part of our country.
We are also saying why shouldn't we have a big screen during the
tri-nations on the beachfront, why don't we have jazz concerts on a
monthly basis on the beach? The World Cup has given us momentum, it has
helped to create a better environment to work in."

Sutcliffe said Durban could proudly say that it had treated Fifa as a
partner and had never sacrificed its objectives.

"We haven't taken out loans to host the World Cup as other cities have
done and we haven't altered one of our long-term objectives in hosting
the event.

"I think we can say we got what we wanted out of Fifa and they got what
they wanted from Durban."

KwaZulu-Natal police spokesman Phindile Radebe acknowledged that the
police numbers would decrease drastically after the World Cup, but was
confident that, the same level of security could be maintained.

Warren Ozard, regional manager for the Federation of Hospitality
Associations of SA, echoed that, saying that police had been trained for
the World Cup, and that this training would not be undone once the
tournament was over.

International and domestic tourists had only reported "wow experiences"
in Durban, he said.

Phillip Sithole acting head of Durban Tourism said: "Before the World
Cup, Durban was not known as an international destination. Durban has
certainly wowed the world and will be remembered for it after the World Cup.

"We need to build on what we have achieved here and take Durban to the
next level."

Mike Jackson chairman, of the Durban Chamber tourism committee, said he
was confident that the authorities would keep security in check after
the World Cup in key tourism areas, especially along the upgraded
beachfront.

"Hosting the World Cup has seen Durban get a major facelift, which will
benefit us long after the event. This is a major turning point for
Durban and this will take our city to a new level as an international
tourism destination into the future," said Jackson.



Manuel in defencse of WC Tickets
This Day, USA Today 9 July 2010

National planning minister Trevor Manuel has come to the defence of
parastatals that have spent huge amounts of taxpayers’ money on World
Cup tickets for staff and clients. His thinking is that purchases by
state-owned entities should be viewed differently to those by government
departments, as they are businesses that need to interact socially with
clients. That may well be true-ish, but doesn’t quite justify the
enormity of certain parastatals’ ticket bills, especially considering
the financial trouble they’re in. Eskom reportedly spent a massive R80
million on tickets and SAA R23 million.



From: V
Date: Mon, 05 Jul 2010 18:58:14 +0200
To: Umbilo-SAPS , "UMBILOSAPS@saps.org.za"

Cc: "KZN:Umbilo Crime Prevention" , Tony
Blaunfeldt
Subject: Urgent Request for Information on Policing Priorities

Dear Lieutenant Colonel Mkhize (Umbilo SAPS Station Commissioner)

I urgently request your attention to the following and direction on what
appears to be an extremely worrying trend in police priorities and actions.

I fully appreciate Umbilo SAPS has had an enormous additional workload
during the FIFA 2010 World Cup which must have put added pressure on
your station regarding staff and resource shortages and the displacement
of crime from the central city areas into suburbs. With this in mind I
have noted with extreme concern recent announcements by the national
Police Commissioner, General Bheki Cele, the Minister of Police, Nathi
Mthethwa and Deputy Police Minister, Fikile Mbalula, that the current
level and focus of policing undertaken over this period will continue
after the World Cup. It has also been stated that 'hotspots' identified
during this event will continue to be the focus of policing efforts in
the future.

Although additional policing is greatly welcomed, the concentration of
police only in specific areas such as the beachfront, is of enormous
concern to residents in the suburbs, particularly Sector 5 which appears
to be experiencing a worrying upsurge in crime, namely housebreaking -
residential and business, vehicle theft etc over this period. We
therefore request your sincere assurance that policing in our area will
not be negatively impacted by the new post-2010 national police focus.
We also request that in the light of recent apparent resource shortages
(I refer here to the incident where 7 Umbilo SAPS officers & 2 patrol
vehicles had to contend with 2 hijackings and a housebreaking on the
same night) that the number of officers and vehicles at Umbilo SAPS be
urgently increased to enable officers on the ground to carry out the
duties required of them and provide a suitable level of service to the
community. The death of one individual in a hijacking is one too many
and additional officers and patrol vehicles would go a long way in
increasing visible policing, crime prevention and promoting improved
police/community relations.

I am also aware that several members of the community living or working
in the Umbilo area have been detained for distributing flyers at the
FIFA Fan Parks advertising 1) a Metro Police sanctioned march for 16
June; and 2) an anti-xenophobia rally for 3 July (also Metro Police
approved). Although I am aware these detentions occurred outside your
jurisdiction, given the recent renaming of the SA Police Service to
‘Force’ and the militarization of police ranks, this appears to be a
worrying trend in the return of an apartheid-style, authoritarian,
dictatorial approach to policing in our country. Personally I do not
comprehend how military ranks within the police service will have any
impression on criminals (some of whom are illiterate), improve officers’
morale or public confidence in their abilities, but that is my
individual opinion.

Furthermore, the recent detention of, among others, the Head of Civil
Society for KZN for distributing flyers informing people of an
anti-xenophobia rally does nothing to engender public belief in police
impartiality regarding this discriminatory scourge. This is also borne
out by the almost complete silence on the subject (except for denials)
from most top police ranks. The fact that the Head of Civil Society was
interrogated for 2 hours in a soundproofed, guarded room by 7 police
officers and a representative from the National Intelligence Agency is
also extremely worrying and the public can only draw the conclusion that
the police are more concerned with complying 100% with FIFA’s draconian
marketing rules than concentrating on real crime (of which combating
xenophobia is a very real concern).

With regard to the above incident, I also therefore request urgent
assurance that our Constitution is still sacrosanct throughout South
Africa and not suspended for a sporting event. If FIFA has been allowed
to declare sovereignty over certain areas of our country, what will be
the next excuse to declare ‘a state of emergency’ - the Olympics?
Although the above incident is not immediately related to Sector 5, it
affects us all and I therefore request to know when our rights,
according to SA’s Constitution (I refer specifically to SA Constitution
Chapter 2, Bill of Rights, Sections 12.1.a-b; 15.1; 16.1.a,b & d; 17;
21.1 & 3; 25.1 & 2.a & b; 35.2.a & f; 37.4.a-b. i-iii; 37.5.a-b) are
negotiable? I seek your direction on this.

It also cannot be stressed enough, the damage this authoritarian
approach has on public perception of the police as well as on structures
such as Community Policing Forums. It is consequently likely that
members of these Forums, set up specifically to encourage community
involvement in crime prevention initiatives, (to which an
anti-xenophobia rally surely contributes significantly) can only deduce
that either the police are not truly committed to preventing the crime
focused on in this instance, or have no real interest in working with
the public and see community involvement as an interference that has, at
best, to be tolerated, and at worst, suppressed.

I therefore kindly request your urgent direction and response to my
queries and community concerns.

Thank you

Regards

Vanessa Burger
Manager: Sector 5 Umbilo Community Policing Forum
0828477766



Furious fans miss semifinal
Sapa 7 July 2010

* Packed King Shaka airport turns away fans
* Airport overwhelmed by VIP plane rush

Johannesburg - Five plane-loads of football fans headed for the World
Cup semifinal between Spain and Germany suffered severe delays on
Wednesday at Durban's King Shaka International Airport, forcing some
fans to miss the match.

Four planes from Johannesburg and one from Cape Town were delayed after
the airport was swamped by arrivals, airport operations director Bongani
Maseko told The Associated Press.

He said the problem was caused by the large numbers of supporters
arriving at the airport for the World Cup semifinal.

All five planes were eventually allowed to land and given a police
escort to the stadium, though too late for many fans to see Spain's 1-0
victory.

Maseko apologised to supporters who missed the game. - Sapa-AP



On a night when durban was supposed to shine, city will be remembered
for wrong reasons

Mercury Reporters 8 July 2010

It was supposed to be the climax to a fantastic World Cup in Durban, but
turned out to be as chaotic as the running of the bulls in Pamplona - at
least at King Shaka International Airport.

Disappointed fans, who had paid thousands to attend the match, the media
and VIPs and politicians were caught up in delays as the airport
struggled to cope with the increased air traffic, including the private
jets of the rich and famous, and flights were diverted away from Durban.

SA singer Danny K, who was to sing at the Durban Fan Fest, was due to
take off from Joburg at 5pm, but only landed in Durban at 10pm.

The figures at last night's match gave the lie to the Airports Company
of SA's initial attempts to play the situation down.

Just 60 960 people watched the match - the lowest of the seven Durban
matches - one that was sold out, and touted to be the "real" final.

From the Washington Post's Steven Goff (see Page 10) to the twitterati,
the comments until early evening were overwhelmingly positive.

But in a short space, frustrated fans, who saw their hopes of watching
the Spain-Germany semi-final dashed, vented their frustration on social
networking sites and radio.

A tourism expert said the chaos would cast Durban in a bad light, but
that the city should get something positive out of it.

"This morning it was announced on TV that we would bid for the Olympics,
so we have to learn our lesson from this."

A riot almost erupted on a 1Time flight from Cape Town to Durban as fans
rushed towards the cockpit when the captain announced that their flight
was being redirected.

Durban soccer fan Jay Moodley said the situation in the plane became
"very tense".

The flight had been scheduled to leave Cape Town at 4.45pm, but left
about 30 minutes later.

Near Port Elizabeth the captain announced that they were being re-routed
to Joburg.

"There was almost a riot on the plane and about 10 foreigners rushed
towards the cockpit. The captain told them that they would be arrested
if they did not sit down. Things were very tense."

About 20 minutes later they were told that a spot at King Shaka had
opened up and that the plane would land in Durban, albeit at 8.50pm -
two hours late.

"People rushed off the plane and were trying to make it to the stadium
in time for the second half. There was a huge anticlimax when we landed
and people were giving Durban the thumbs down."

Airlines said they would demand answers from Acsa.

Up to 40 private aircraft were parked at the former Durban International
Airport and sources said Virginia Airport's parking bays were eventually
called into use, but questions remained as to why Acsa had allowed
private aircraft to park at King Shaka airport for the match.

"This is a massive disappointment in terms of planning and I am very
eager to hear how it happened," said Kulula.com CEO Gidon Novick, who
had three flights diverted to OR Tambo, and more than 500 passengers who
missed the match.

Shannon Kalil, from Houston, Texas, whose son-in-law, ardent Spanish
supporter Jean-Pierre Baizan - was stuck at OR Tambo - said: "People
have spent so much to follow their teams and now they can't land at the
airport.

"This is a huge let-down."

Allegations were also rife that preference was being given to private
VIP aircraft.

Mango CEO Nico Bezuidenhout said airlines had worked to resolve the
issue and get people to the game.

An angry Cape Town woman with a ticket to the match cancelled her flight
and forfeited her chance to watch the match because her flight would
have landed well after kickoff.

"I can live with it because I can go home and watch there, but Cape Town
airport is full of Spanish and German supporters who are stuck."

At about 5.30pm, Acsa spokesman Colin Naidoo said there had been a
20-minute closure of airspace around the airport earlier in the
afternoon as too many flights were trying to land.

Asked why there was a problem, he said: "I don't know, but we are now
catching up with delays."

Air Traffic and Navigation Services Africa spokeswoman Anna Sanfilippo
said, however, the airspace had not been closed.

"We had to implement a ground delay programme (which prevents aircraft
from landing and other inbound-flights from taking off) because of
insufficient parking."

"I can't keep a plane in the sky if there is no parking," she said.

However, Acsa maintained there was enough parking space.

Naidoo said the old Durban International Airport was used to cater for
scores of chartered planes landing ahead of the match and that there had
been 30 to 40 chartered planes parked at the old airport.

A source said several light aircraft began landing at Virginia Airport
around 6.30pm.



Packed King Shaka airport turns away fans
Wendy Jasson da Costa 7 July 2010

Airport overwhelmed by VIP plane rush
Hundreds of soccer lovers who were hoping to fly to Durban for the
semifinal between Spain and Germany are still stuck at airports around
the country and could not make it in time for them to watch the match.

What was supposed to be the end to a brilliant world cup streak for the
city turned into a nightmare when King Shaka International airport could
not accommodate anymore aircraft as its parking area was full.

Frustrated fans vented their frustrations on twitter during the match.
This is what some of them had to say.

AshleyBann

I am f*****g convinced we got shack-dwellers running the bloody Durban
airport! I wonder how many paying fans will not get to see the game??



That's it folks, so what now?
Colleen Dardagan, Suren Naidoo & Bronwyn Gerretsen 8 July 2010

THE World Cup has come and gone for Durban - and now it is time to ask,
what now?

Will Durban return to the old or will residents and visitors continue to
reap the benefits of hosting the beautiful game ?

City manager Michael Sutcliffe told The Mercury last night: "The World
Cup has given us momentum, it has helped to create a better environment
to work."

At the forefront of Durban's World Cup planning was how it would benefit
the city.

The city would continue to focus on poverty and unemployment, Sutcliffe
said.

Durban's port would also continue to receive attention, including the
need for a decision on a dug-out port.

"We have a 20-year vision and want that area to ensure we develop a
world-class port," Sutcliffe said.

Moreover, Durban would still "put up its hand" for international and
national mega and mid-events.

The city would host the transplant games, the Baptist conference and was
also looking at the master and veteran games.

"These type of events have huge benefits for the city and we are
deciding which of those events we need in the city," said Sutcliffe.

On Durban's mulitimillion-rand revamped promenade, Sutcliffe said it had
brought the city together again.

"Our beachfront is the most non-racist, non-sexist part of our country.
We are also saying why shouldn't we have a big screen during the
tri-nations on the beachfront, why don't we have jazz concerts on a
monthly basis on the beach? The World Cup has given us momentum, it has
helped to create a better environment to work in."

Sutcliffe said Durban could proudly say that it had treated Fifa as a
partner and had never sacrificed its objectives.

"We haven't taken out loans to host the World Cup as other cities have
done and we haven't altered one of our long-term objectives in hosting
the event.

"I think we can say we got what we wanted out of Fifa and they got what
they wanted from Durban."

KwaZulu-Natal police spokesman Phindile Radebe acknowledged that the
police numbers would decrease drastically after the World Cup, but was
confident that, the same level of security could be maintained.

Warren Ozard, regional manager for the Federation of Hospitality
Associations of SA, echoed that, saying that police had been trained for
the World Cup, and that this training would not be undone once the
tournament was over.

International and domestic tourists had only reported "wow experiences"
in Durban, he said.

Phillip Sithole acting head of Durban Tourism said: "Before the World
Cup, Durban was not known as an international destination. Durban has
certainly wowed the world and will be remembered for it after the World Cup.

"We need to build on what we have achieved here and take Durban to the
next level."

Mike Jackson chairman, of the Durban Chamber tourism committee, said he
was confident that the authorities would keep security in check after
the World Cup in key tourism areas, especially along the upgraded
beachfront.

"Hosting the World Cup has seen Durban get a major facelift, which will
benefit us long after the event. This is a major turning point for
Durban and this will take our city to a new level as an international
tourism destination into the future," said Jackson.



DURBAN'S ROAD TO 2010

2004 South Africa wins the right to host the 2010 Fifa World Cup.

February 2006 City Manager, Mike Sutcliffe signs Fifa's host city agreement.

February 10, 2006 Public tender advertised for the new stadium.

October 2006 Demolition of King's Park football stadium.

March 2008 Arch footings complete.

June 3 2008 Precast columns completed.

June 12 2006 Ibhola Lethu Consortium's stadium design wins.

June 2006 Group 5/WBHO/Pandev awarded principal building contract.

August 2008 Stadium bowl completed.

November 7, 2008 Compression ring completed.

April 30, 2009 Cable net completed.

October 26, 2009 Teflon-coated roof membrane installed.

September 11, 2009 Pitch laid.

October 15, 2009 Seats installed.

October 29, 2009 SkyCar installed.

November 24, 2009 Moses Mabhida Stadium completed.

November 29, 2009 First football match at the stadium, AmaZulu versus
Maritzburg United.

November 2009 Large video screens installed.

February 2010 Temporary seating to take the capacity up to 70 000 installed.

March 2010 People's Park completed

April Western bypass complete.

Bridges on the main routes in the city get a lick of paint.

May 1, 2010 King Shaka International Airport opens.

May 2010 The city unveils public transport plan.

May 23 Retailers and tenants vacate the Moses Mabhida Stadium.

May 24 Fifa takes over the Moses Mabhida Stadium.

May 31 Beachfront upgrade complete.



Manuel defends Cup tickets splurge
Mail & Guardian 6 July 2010

A distinction should be made between parastatals and state departments spending money on Soccer World Cup tickets, Minister in the National Planning Commission Trevor Manuel said on Monday.

This follows an outcry over state entities spending millions on soccer tickets.

Manuel said parastatals were business entities that needed to make profits by engaging on a social level with clients.

"Some of the parastatals are business entities and these business entities have to run themselves in a particular way.

"We mustn't hyperventilate when the national airline takes tour operators and builds a relationship with them, because that is building the business.

"When you take a local authority or a government department and they spend taxpayers' money on themselves it's a different issue."

Big spenders
The Sunday Times reported that Eskom, which has been embroiled in a wage dispute, spent R12-million on World Cup tickets.

Ayanda Noah, Eskom's managing director of distribution, told the M&G that Eskom bought 1 110 tickets during 2009 and 2010. Of these, about 700 were hospitality tickets, valued at about R17 000 each. The remaining 400 were for general seating.

The executive decision to purchase the tickets was taken in November 2008, only four months before the end of the financial year that saw Eskom hit its biggest loss of R9,7-billion.

Eskom's dire financial situation led to the parastatal asking the World Bank this year for a R27-billion loan to maintain the country’s supply of electricity.

South African Airways spent R23-million on tickets, two months before getting a R1,6-billion bail-out from the government.

PetroSA and Transnet jointly spent R24-million and the Free State provincial government and the Mangaung municipality spent almost R22-million on tickets.

The Congress of South African Trade Unions has described the purchases as "outrageous" and on Monday reportedly called for a probe into government and state-owned entities' spending on tickets.

It's the most selfish way of spending money and it is recklessness of the worst kind," Cosatu eneral Secretary Zwelenzima Vavi said.

"We are appealing to workers to act in the national interest, when their managers are acting in the most selfish way," Vavi was quoted as saying.

The National Union of Mineworkers (NUM), representing about half of Eskom's 32 000 staff, said none of its members benefitted from the hospitality tickets.

"Only the executives and their wives and their children received tickets," NUM spokesperson Lesiba Seshoka said. -- Sapa, Reuters
www.mg.co.za



Hawkers arrested at Soccer City
Sapa 3 July 2010

Ten hawkers trading at the Soccer City in Soweto were arrested for
violating their trade permits, Johannesburg metro police said on Saturday.

"Some were trading in goods that they did not have permit to sell while
others had no permit at all to sell at the stadium," said Chief
Superintendent Wayne Minnaar.

He said the hawkers were arrested on Friday night, during the game
between Ghana and Uruguay.

Their goods have been confiscated and they will have to pay a fine to
released them.

They will have to pay a fine of R1000 for perishable goods and R1500 for
non perishable.



FIFA turf 'not the place for other agendas'
Activists held at Durban fan park

Wendy Jasson da Costa The Mercury 5 July 2010

Activist, Durban academic and Mercury columnist Patrick Bond was
arrested twice and warned that he would be charged with ambush marketing
for handing out anti-xenophobia fliers at the beachfront Fifa Fan Fest
at the weekend.

Bond, head of the Centre for Civil Society, based at the University of
KwaZulu-Natal, student Samantha Sencer-Mura and and Giuliano
Martiniello, who is part of an Italian film crew, were detained by
police at South Beach while handing out the fliers.

Bond said he was grilled for two hours by police and a member of the
National Intelligence Agency, who said they could be charged with
incitement and ambush marketing.

"All we were marketing was the constitution," said Bond, who could not
understand Fifa's "control freak mindset".

He said the police were at pains to explain that the Fan Fest was Fifa
turf and that "there was no space for constitutional rights". They also
told him he could be creating a problem by promoting a rally, said Bond.

After the anti-xenophobia rally on Saturday, he returned to the
beachfront to hand out fliers questioning whether Fifa had taken too
much out of South Africa - like R25 billion in tax-free profits, and
with nothing trickling down to poor people. He was detained and
questioned again before being released.

Bond said his aim was to create awareness of the threat of another
countrywide wave of xenophobia, which was likely to occur after the
World Cup, and to prevent it.

Last month, ambush marketing made headlines when two Dutch women were
arrested and charged for being behind a campaign to promote Bavaria, a
beer company sponsoring 36 "Bavaria babes" to wear branded orange
dresses at a match between Denmark and Holland.

Budweiser is an official sponsor of the World Cup and Bavaria was not
allowed to promote its brand in Fifa areas.

Police Brigadier Phindile Radebe said Bond had been warned that: "In
terms of the Fifa act, no one is allowed to use a Fifa platform for his
own goal."

A Fifa spokesman would not comment, saying Fifa were aware of the
incident but had not received any information from the police.

At Saturday's rally, Bishop Paul Verryn, of the Central Methodist Church
in Joburg, said it was better to create awareness of the threat of
xenophobia and to avert another crisis than to keep quiet and watch
another tragedy unfold after the World Cup.

"Unless proved otherwise, it is the politicians who are behind these
threats," said Verryn, who has helped thousands of asylum seekers.

While sceptics have questioned whether the rumours hold any water,
Bibimba Mufaume of the Democratic Republic of Congo, who works in
Congella, said his South African colleagues were concerned for his
safety and had advised him to seek alternative safe accommodation soon.

Mufaume called on the government to forestall another wave of xenophobia.



North West economic crisis and the FIFA World Cup
COSATU 30 June 2010

The Congress of South African Trade Unions and its affiliates are seriously disturbed by the ongoing poor community service delivery and the poor response of the Provincial Growth and Development Strategy (PGDS) to the high unemployment rate which is increasing on a daily basis

Now we are still told that there is no budget for water in the Setlagole rural community area. We are told that some of the developments or projects to create decent work are suspended for making money available to the FIFA World Cup.

At the time when the FIFA World Cup was coming to South Africa, we were told that its programmes will also play a central role to improve opportunities for SMMEs and creating some jobs for the poor working class, in particular for the unemployed and rural communities.

COSATU in the province is requesting the provincial government and all the municipalities to release a public report on who benefited from the FIFA World Cup, in particular the PVAs.

Creating decent jobs has been a theory in all the MEC budget speeches since 2009, no action, no sign of programmes towards creating decent work. The PGDS is also not able to respond to the economic crisis we are facing in the province. We are losing jobs in mining, manufacturing and agriculture due to the political agenda and personal interests of our deployees in the government.

Exposing corruption in all government departments and municipalities will continue regardless of threats, intimidation, victimisation and the plan to terminate ANC membership to some of members of COSATU who are whistle blowers.

Consolidating working class power in defense of the decent work and socialism!

For more information feel free to call COSATU provincial secretary comrade SOLLY PHETOE on 0823044055.



SA's done well with the World Cup ‑ SACP
SACP 29 June 2010

Political Bureau commends ordinary South Africans for making event a success

WELL DONE SOUTH AFRICA!

SACP Political Bureau Statement

The Political Bureau of the SACP held its scheduled monthly meeting in
Johannesburg yesterday, June 28th.

The meeting of the PB afforded the leadership of the SACP with an
opportunity to evaluate the ongoing organisational and campaigning work
of the SACP since our special national congress in December last year,
and to discuss progress within our ANC‑led alliance following a series
of Alliance Political Council meetings as well as bilaterals. Also on
the agenda of the PB was a "half‑time" evaluation of SA's hosting of the
soccer World Cup.

At a time when many other political formations are in decline and are
showing serious signs of factional degeneration, the SACP's unity and
membership continues to grow significantly. Current membership stands at
over 105,000, making us by far the second‑largest political party in SA,
after our ally the ANC. Our membership growth is directly linked to our
community‑based activism and a range of campaigns spearheaded by the
Party. Our current campaign against corruption has clearly struck a
powerful chord amongst a wide‑range of South Africans. Together with a
wide range of forces we will be intensifying this campaign in the coming
months by focusing on the blockages to service delivery to poor
communities ‑ many of these blockages are directly related to
"tenderpreneurship" and other corrupting practices.

Contrary to an impression sometimes created in the media, Alliance
unity, particularly at the national level, has generally been
considerably consolidated over the past two and a half years. Alliance
unity is not about a shallow feel‑good sentimentality, but about
principled activism around a shared strategic programme. Over the past
year the SACP has consistently distinguished between the great majority
of ANC leaders, members and supporters, on the one hand, and a small
group of wreckers who do not want to see ANC, still less Alliance‑wide
unity consolidated. The SACP believes that the narrow sectarian agenda
of this small group has increasingly been exposed, as they have become
more desperate and brazen. Their exposure and marginalisation bodes well
for consolidating unity across our movement, and, indeed, for building
the widest, patriotic, nation‑building effort within our country.

In this latter regard, the PB noted with great approval the many
positive achievements in evidence on the ground within our country over
the past two weeks of the soccer World Cup. The South African government
and the people of SA have united together, like never before, to host
hundreds of thousands of international guests from other parts of
Africa, and from third and first world countries alike. Our
international guests in their majority have also played their part,
mingling with township communities and staying often in relatively
modest accommodation. They are helping to remind us that they want to
celebrate SA for what we are ‑ a developing country with many challenges
‑ and not for some illusory second‑hand copy of the developed north.

The organisation of this World Cup has been different from most others
in that government in all spheres has played a much more central role
than, for instance, in Germany in 2006. This was necessitated by the
scale of infrastructural development ‑ notably with new stadiums and a
wide range of new transport‑related infrastructure. The SA Police have
also had to step in on an even large scale than originally planned as a
result of private security failures (linked, of course, to labour
brokering and casualisation). What we have seen has been a developmental
state in action, rallying the widest range of South Africans around a
common vision and a common task. Of course, beyond mid‑July the key
challenge will be how to build on the momentum and experience gained.
This, in any case, is not an issue that has been deferred to mid‑July,
from the start we have sought to ensure that we use the World Cup to lay
down a transformational legacy in our towns and cities. This will
particularly be the case with public transport.

But if government along with the Local Organising Committee need to be
congratulated, it is, above all, ordinary South Africans from across the
spectrum who we need to be saluted. What the last few weeks have once
more demonstrated is that millions of South Africans, black and white,
desperately want to feel part of a unifying programme of action. Let us
build on this momentum by focusing our collective energies on the
challenges we all face as a nation ‑ jobs, transforming health‑care and
education, rural development, and fighting the scourge of crime and
corruption.

We need the same focus in tackling the above priorities as we did with
the FIFA World Cup ‑ a state led action buttressed by mass activism.

Well done, South Africa! The SACP is proud to be a communist party, an
internationalist party, AND, not least, South African!

Statement issued by Malesela Maleka, SACP Spokesperson, June 29 2010



NMF concerned at post World Cup xenophabia threat
NMF 30 June 2010

Mandela Foundation says South African should show greater appreciation
for non‑nationals

Foundation hopes 2010 FIFA World CupTM will lead to greater social unity
in South Africa

We have a common humanity to share

July 29, 2010 ‑ The Nelson Mandela Foundation is concerned about rumours
surfacing that there are negative sentiments arising towards
non‑nationals in South Africa.

We have seen South Africans unite around a common support for African
teams during the 2010 FIFA World CupTM. We hope that this will lead to
greater appreciation by South Africans of our place on this continent
and that we will show greater solidarity with non‑nationals. We have a
common humanity to share and in many ways a common economic and social
destiny and our Constitution guarantees the rights of all people in
South Africa.

As Nelson Mandela once said:

"We cannot blame other people for our troubles. We are not victims to
the influx of foreign people into South Africa. We must remember that it
was mainly due to the aggressive and hostile policies of the apartheid
regime that the economic development of our neighbours was undermined."

The Nelson Mandela Foundation, through its Dialogue Programme, has since
2009, conducted a series of community conversations throughout South
Africa to raise awareness about the rights of all people living in South
Africa; to empower communities to find peaceful means of problem‑solving
and to ensure that community issues are brought to the attention of
policy‑makers.

Statement issued by the Nelson Mandela Foundation, June 29 2010



Rapper activist compiles international protest album
Daily Dispatch 28 June 2010

A GRAHAMSTOWN hip hop activist has pulled off a major international coup
after he convinced rappers from all over the world – including two
Muslim females from the UK – to contribute to a music album designed to
“red card” social injustice.

Launched this weekend – just in time for the World Cup Soccer knockout
rounds – the Officially Offside album features 21 tracks from diverse
places like Europe, South America, Asia, Africa and even Iran.

Inspired by the landmark Khulumani Support Group civil lawsuit in
America, Xolile “X” Madinda said the idea behind the album was to raise
awareness for the campaign to get reparations for black South Africans
from multi- national corporations who supported the apartheid government.

Three weeks ago Officially Offside was just another idea but thanks to
the use of new technology – and enthusiastic, rapid fire contributions
from around the world – the album has now gone global via the world wide
web.

Without this technology “X” would still be sitting in Grahamstown
dreaming of compiling a melting pot album of world music to raise social
consciousness – instead of putting the finished product online for all
to hear.

“The tracks were coming in very fast … it snowballed so much, we still
have 15 tracks that we could not put on the album.”

These tracks will now be available online – along with the album, X said.

“The artists all did it for free … they said if any money was made it
should go to Khulumani,” he said. “This is just another form of activism
… these issues must be out there, it is not about colour, it is about
one voice.”

Although born in 1979 – three years after the Soweto Uprising – X says
his generation still had meaningful contributions to make to society and
the daily struggles faced by the oppressed.

“We are part of a new wave of activism around the world using music to
tackle social issues.

“This is the first hip hop album in South Africa that tackles such
relevant issues.”

According to X it was a conscious decision to use a soccer theme like
Officially Offside to highlight Khulumani’s plight as many of the
companies who supported the Soccer World Cup had also benefited doing
business in apartheid South Africa.

“We want to red card the companies that sponsored apartheid.”

Despite contributions from around the world – all via word of mouth –
the album retains its African roots thanks to Xhosa, Zulu, Ghanaian,
Togolese, Congolese and Angolan contributions.

“We are hoping Officially Offside will become more than just an album
for reparations … we are hoping it will become a much broader world
campaign to get rid of (all) social injustice.”

More information can be obtained from www.redcardcampaign.wordpress.com

By DAVID MACGREGOR, Port Alfred Bureau, davidm@dispatch.co.za



Sleeping in the Shadow
Africa Media Online's TwentyTen project presents this video about a
small group of homeless people who live in the shadow of the new Green
Point Stadium in Cape Town. Several times they have been uprooted from
the trees or corners they called home and moved to other areas around
the stadium to make way for construction.
http://www.mg.co.za/multimedia/2010-06-25-sleeping-in-the-shadow



Cashing-in claims: Jordaan comes out swinging
Theo Nkonki 26 June 2010

Local Organising Committee CEO Danny Jordaan on Saturday dismissed
claims that his brother was benefiting from the Soccer World Cup.

"I cannot comment on that. All I know is that we are focused on dealing
with the World Cup," he said during a media conference at Soccer City.

He dismissed as "nonsense" the fact that some local media had insisted
on referring to the South African Football Association elections to
insinuate there was tension between himself and Safa chairperson Irvin
Khoza.

He also refuted the Mail and Guardian's report that he had submitted an
affidavit to his lawyers in an effort to take legal steps against the
newspaper.

"Do you know the lawyers?" he asked.

"I'd be happy if you gave me their names."

The M&G established that a company belonging to Jordaan's younger
brother, Andrew, was appointed by Match Event Services, the tournament's
exclusive provider of hospitality packages, to act as its liaison in
Port Elizabeth for R200 000 a month.

Match Event Services (Pty) Ltd is the local subsidiary of Match Services
AG, a Zurich-based company appointed by Fifa to provide ticketing,
accommodation and event information technology for the Soccer World Cup.

The job entails being the the go-to between Match and hospitality
business owners in Port Elizabeth.

Andrew Jordaan's close corporation, Sapphire Dawn Trading 154, was
appointed venue liaison officer for Match Event Services in April last
year by Match's Johannesburg head office. As the only member of the CC,
he stands to gain more than R3-million by the time his contract ends in
August. The close corporation was registered in March 2007 and Andrew
Jordaan became its sole member on May 15 that year.

A source privy to the negotiations told the M&G that Andrew Jordaan's
appointment was kept a secret until he made a surprise entrance at a top
management meeting in Port Elizabeth, where a Match official introduced
him as the city's venue liaison.

Match's human resource official in Johannesburg, Coral Collins, said
that rumours that Andrew was head-hunted for the post were unfounded.

"He was not head-hunted but interviewed in March 2009 and found to be
extremely well qualified and suited to fulfil the role within Match,"
she said.

She could not tell the M&G where the job was advertised, but did say
that Andrew Jordaan's close corporation was being paid less than R250
000 a month for the contract.

Another source close to the negotiation said that the contract was worth
R200 000 a month. Errol Heynes, Nelson Mandela Bay's 2010 director, told
the M&G that Match did not formally tell him about Jordaan's appointment
but that it was "not necessary" for it to have done so.

Jordaan said his and Khoza's focus was on ensuring a smooth tournament
for players and fans.

He said however the failure of most African teams to qualify for the
knockout round had been a disappointment.

'Perfect' World Cup
On the current labour dispute between security guards and their
employer, Jordaan said that Fifa would pay the costs relating to the
redeployment of police officers at stadiums.

Fifa secretary general Jerome Valcke hailed South Africa as the best
host to date of the soccer tournament.

"South Africa will always be a plan B for any World Cup," Valcke said,
referring to reports ahead of the tournament that Fifa had a back-up
plan should hosting the tournament in SA go awry.

He said that South Africa was one of the best attended World Cup's in 20
years.

He said that there would be additional security at the Free State
stadium for Sunday's match between Germany and England.

He said Fifa had experienced transport problem at the beginning of the
tournament and that it was now focused on organising the July 11 closing
ceremony.

"It's been a perfect World Cup. The number of foreign visitors and
tickets sales were beyond expectations," said Valcke. - Sapa and M&G
reporter



We warned you - Fifa on scam ticket sales
Sapa 27 June 2010

Johannesburg - Fifa has distanced itself from ticketing scams that sold
fake tickets to soccer fans, leaving them frustrated at various stadiums
across the country.

At a media briefing in Johannesburg on Sunday, Fifa spokesman Nicolas
Maingot said fans had been warned in advance not to buy tickets from
service providers who were not accredited with the organisation.

This after a number of fans were denied access to various stadiums after
it was discovered that their tickets were not legit.

"We have published many warnings since 2006 that people who want to buy
tickets should go buy tickets through Fifa channels," Maingot said.

He also pleaded with the media to spread the message and warn fans to
steer clear of people selling fake tickets.

Fans who want to buy or re-sell their tickets should go to any First
National Bank branch, Shorprite and Checkers supermarkets and Fifa
centres. Fans could also call 083-123-2010 to verify the status of their
tickets or change any details on them.

The ticketing scams have also swindled more than R6.5 million from a
number of local companies like petrochemicals giant, Sasol.

The Sunday Times reported that a ticketing firm invoiced Sasol Oil, a
Sasol business unit for R3.3 million. The company had paid for 110
tickets for the two semi-finals and the final. It also paid for VIP
hospitality services at matches, including meals and drinks.

Clifford Green, a lawyer acting for Fifa and its hospitality affiliate
Match, confirmed to the Sunday Times that this week, he had handed over
a dossier of affidavits from seven companies, outlining their huge
losses. - Sapa



The fashion interlude: Spotted: FUCK FIFA....
Ds Seth Dennis 10 June 2010

We spotted this trendy guy Woodstock, Cape Town, at the Neighborgoods
Market as well, wearing this not so cryptic word-play T, with FICK FUFA
& FACK FIFU for FUCK FIFA on it, it was a very cool t-shirt and very
appropriate regarding the FIFA 2010 World Cup, the very first in the
African continent is being held here in South Africa, so it was an
interesting message or display of perception about the organizers of the
tournament, which I figured would make for a good talking point. The
t-shirt was designed by (name removed, leave comment or mail poster for
details of designer & distributer of shirt). Anyway, today marks the
official first day of the 2010 World Cup games; kicked off by South
Africa, as tradition for the host country, versus Mexico, which we hope
will not completely annihilate us. I need to get hold of Jasper soon
because I need that t-shirt for a friend who I know will love it based
on his experience with his dealings with FIFA. We will be featuring more
on this subject later, but for now I’m curious to know whether everyone
else loves or hates FIFA
thefashioninterlude.blogspot.com



SWC blanket thief gets 2 yrs
25 June 2010

Rustenburg - A North West man was jailed for two years for stealing a
blanket and three beers from a 75-year-old German fan after a World Cup
match, police said on Friday.

Mothusi Phiri, 21, was arrested on Tuesday evening after he robbed the
German man of his complimentary blanket and Budweiser beers after the
Mexico-Uruguay match in Rustenburg, police said.

"He was arrested on the same day and sentenced to 36 months, which was
reduced to two years," said North West police spokesperson Lesego Metsi.

The German man was walking out of the stadium when someone snatched his
blanket and beers, Metsi added.

Meanwhile, three Free State youths were given 24 months' corrective
supervision for robbing a Japanese photographer in Bloemfontein, Sapa
reported.

Sitting in camera, a World Cup court sentenced the three youths, all
aged 17, to a further seven years imprisonment, wholly suspended for
five years.

The youths' mothers had earlier testified in mitigation of sentence.

Charges against two others were dropped.



APF Johannesburg Region march on Friday 25th June to highlight the housing crisis in poor communities
APF 24 June 2010

The gathering point is at Johannesburg Library Gardens from 10h00. The march will start at 11h00 and will proceed to the Department of Housing on Sauer Street (between Market and President Streets).

The APF Johannesburg Region invites all progressive community organisations, social movements, unions and other organs of civil society and individuals to join our march to highlight the ongoing and intensifying housing crisis in poor communities.

Come join in the struggle to expose and turn back the neo-liberal policies that continue to impoverish the majority and make a small minority rich.

While billions are being made out of the present Soccer World Cup in South Africa, millions living in South Africa are falling ever-deeper into poverty. While additional billions have been, and continue to be, poured into building stadiums, urban highways and high-speed trains – infrastructure that will not directly benefit the poor – millions across the country

still live in shacks and sub-standard housing far away from work places and other services. Thousands continue to be forcibly evicted and denied their rightful title deeds. Socio-economic inequality is reaching epidemic proportions.

Despite endless promises by national,provincial and local government, quality and affordable housing remains a pipe-dream for ever-increasing numbers of people. One of the main reasons for this is that government continues to rely on private banks and construction corporates as the main housing ‘delivery’ agent. To add insult to injury, where housing projects have been undertaken in poor communities, most have been completely abused and undermined by widespread corruption of public officials

and ‘private’ tenderpreneurs. Besides the disappearing millions and the shoddy construction, there is also the illegal selling of people’s houses by these corrupt and venal criminals.

Without decent, affordable publicly provided housing, there can be no enjoyment of most basic services, no personal and community security, no human dignity. We will not stand idly by and accept this so-called ‘reality’. We want change and we want it now!

Phambili ngo mzabalazo we zindlu phambili

For more information contact:

Sibongile on 074 485 8127 or Ellen on 082 663 3133
APF
123 Pritchard Street , 6th Floor, Vogas House - Johannesburg
Tel: 0113338334; Fax 011333 8335'
Website: www.apf.org.za



PERMISSION DENIED IN PRETORIA FOR THE MEXICAN PICKET ON THE 28 JUNE
Hlokoza MOTAU 22 June 2010

Dear Comrades

Please find attached a letter from the Tshwane City Council denying the march and picket on the 28 June at the Mexican Embassy.

We need to consider alternative forms of protest we elaborated this morning because we can't use only distribution of pamphlets as a form protest.



Men's SWC tickets confiscated
Sports 24 18 June 2010

Johannesburg - Two men had their World Cup tickets for the game between the USA and Slovenia confiscated just before the game started at Ellis Park in Johannesburg on Friday.

The men were caught allegedly selling tickets in a road leading up to the entrance of the stadium.

"We are just taking them to check if their tickets are fraudulent," said a South African Police Warrant Officer, who was part of a group of policemen who pounced on the men.

The two men, one dressed in a Mexican tracksuit top and the other in a white sweatshirt, protested heavily while they were marched to a security point.

Hard to catch sellers
A colonel at the gate, who didn't want to give his name, said police had a hard time dealing with people selling tickets to fans who were desperate to get into the games.

"We are trying to keep them away because it is illegal," he said. "But they are moving around all the time."

He said it was a definite possibility that the tickets that were being sold right in front of the gate were fake.

However, one of the two was later released, and police said he had been trying to sell free tickets his employer had given him.

Three other men were pounced on quickly when they tried to sell a reporter three tickets for R400 each.

The Category four tickets were officially priced at R140, and were barcoded.

Ticket sellers shunted
One of the tickets had the name Jonas Mashele printed on it. The others had different names. "We won them from work," said the man who wanted to sell the ticket.

He declined to say where he worked. The other tickets, his friend said, was bought over the internet. "You can go check them at the gate," one of them said. "We don't mind."

Police shunted them away quickly as they were also drinking alcohol in public.

None of the men allegedly selling tickets were arrested.

Tickets were widely available, at a price, before the last two games played at Ellis Park.

Tickets for the Brazil game against North Korea sold for R1000 each before kick-off, but dropped to R560 right after the game started.



FIFA President to Visit Burma

FIFA president Sepp Blatter said he will visit Burma in November, according to Burmese newspapers.

Zaw Zaw, the chairman of the Myanmar [Burma] Football Federation (MFF), met with Blatter for 20 minutes recently while

attending the 60th FIFA Congress in South Africa. If Blatter visits Burma, he will be the second FIFA president to visit the

country, following former FIFA President Sir Stanley Rous who visited in 1972.

MFF has received US $400,000 in funding from FIFA to initiate a football academy training program that cost a total $1

million to promote the development of boys




Swift and Severe Justice at World Cup Courts
ROB HUGHES The New York Times 20 June 2010

JOHANNESBURG — When Themba Makhubu, a 22-year-old Johannesburg man,
stood before a judge last week, he was sentenced to five years in prison.

His crime was stealing a cellphone two days earlier, and the magistrate
left him without a doubt that his punishment had everything to do with
the World Cup.

“You know the negative media reports that South Africa is receiving
internationally because of crime,” the judge, Hein Louw, told him on
Friday. “You knew the man you stole from was not from here. If you had a
previous conviction, this court would not have hesitated to sentence you
to between 10 and 15 years in jail.”

The court is one of 56 dedicated courts set up throughout South Africa
to deal swift, summary and severe deterrents during the monthlong World Cup.

Mr. Makhubu had not used force or threats when stealing the phone, but
he could not have timed his theft any worse.

He was the 25th person brought before the so-called instant justice
courts set up under the National Prosecution Authority last week. Others
included foreign nationals from Brazil, Germany, India, Peru, Slovenia,
Uganda, the United States and Zimbabwe.

Their misdemeanors ranged from petty theft to armed robbery. In the case
of two young women, their mistake was wearing orange dresses that FIFA
deemed to be part of an “ambush marketing” campaign promoting a Dutch
beer — rather than Budweiser, which pays FIFA handsomely to be its
official and exclusive World Cup brew.

The first reported crime appears to have been the worst so far. On the
Wednesday before the World Cup kicked off, a Portuguese newspaper
photographer was awakened in his hotel room in the dead of night and
forced at gunpoint to give up his cameras, cash and clothing.

Two days later, two Zimbabweans were sentenced to 15 years in prison for
armed robbery. A Nigerian accomplice was sentenced to four years for
possessing the victim’s camera equipment. This, said the justice
minister, demonstrated that South Africa would not tolerate crime from
anyone “during this World Cup.”

The crackdown shows how far South Africa is prepared to go to
accommodate FIFA and its commercial partners.

But not everyone is upset; some South Africans said they were pleased
with the crackdown.

“It is amazing, yes,” said Sam Makhomu, a Johannesburg chauffeur. “Five
years for the man who stole a phone? But I support it. My wife had a
cellphone stolen from her some time ago. She wasn’t going to give it,
but a passer-by said to her, ‘Better to let them have the phone than
resist and lose your life.’

“That’s how it is in South Africa,” he added. “So if World Cup justice
is harsh, maybe something will continue for all of us after the
important foreigners have gone.”

Others are not so certain. They wonder if this is a one-time showcase of
justice. They suspect that the prisoners will go free when the V.I.P.
visitors have departed. They fear that the special courts are temporary,
and that the notion of instant justice cuts corners and presumes guilt
too quickly.

“This is your fault,” a woman in Soweto told a foreign journalist while
watching South Africa’s game against Uruguay. “You journalists come here
and talk of crime-infested South Africa, and our justice is just trying
to show the world it is tough.

“But it isn’t fair or equal,” she added. “The same day that Makhubu got
five years for taking a foreigner’s phone in Joburg, a Ugandan woman who
did the same thing in Durban was offered a deal of 12 months’ jail or
paying a fine of 6,000 rand.” (That penalty would amount to almost $800.)

Others say it is posturing, and the publicity attracted by the harsh
sentences is sending out mixed messages. It confirms the impression of
criminal activity, but it does not address the root causes of crime in
the country.

They see empty seats in stadiums, and some ask where all the tickets
went after they tried to buy some but could not. Some admit they could
not in their wildest dreams afford even the cheapest tickets advertised
for South Africans only.

Meanwhile, 2 of the 36 Dutch women who were questioned by FIFA officials
and South African police in the case of the orange dresses now face
charges relating to “unlawful commercial activities.”

While a FIFA spokesman was insisting that nobody had been detained, the
police authorities said that Barbara Castelein and Minte Niewpoort had
each been granted bail of 10,000 rand and had their passports confiscated.

The Dutch brewery has won the publicity contest. Like Nike and Puma and
others who are not official sponsors, the game within a game is to dream
up publicity stunts to gain attention during the most televised event on
earth without paying sponsorship money to FIFA.

Those payments boost the soccer body’s profits to $3.2 billion over a
four-year World Cup cycle.

“This is a tournament of severe host-nation pain,” said Danny Jordaan,
head of the organizing committee in reference to his country’s
performance on the field, “but a celebration for the organizing
committee preparations.”

In some aspects, Jordaan is right. There is more chaos around the
stadiums and in the congested streets than at any World Cup since Mexico
in 1986. Tasks that should take minutes can stretch for hours. But, as
in Mexico, the civility of the population and the smiles of the unpaid
volunteers wins most days.

Traffic lights occasionally go out, but the national electricity company
claims this is not a deliberate act to save power to ensure that the
stadium floodlights stay on. Electricity workers threatened a strike but
eventually reached an agreement.

Stadium security workers, in Cape Town, Durban and elsewhere, held
protest marches over their pay. The workers claimed that they were
offered 126 to 190 rand for shifts up to 15 hours, and that on night
games they had no transport to get home and slept in bus shelters or
police stations in freezing conditions.

FIFA disclaimed responsibility for the problems and welcomed a police
takeover of the security role.

Moral of the story: don't commit a crime against a foreigner.

Speedy justice in World Cup courts: a model for the future?
By DPA, IANS 16 June 2010

JOHANNESBURG - Doping is banned at the World Cup but the South African
justice system acts as if it’s on steroids.

Faced with a barrage of questioning over security in the run-up to the
tournament, as persistent as the drone of vuvuzelas, the host nation has
pulled out all the stops to shake its image of a criminal haven.

Apart from deploying 41,000 police around stadiums, fan parks, hotels
and tourist sites, and stocking up on helicopters, water cannon and
other equipment, the government has also set up 56 dedicated World Cup
courts across the country.

Staffed by dedicated prosecutors working with dedicated teams of
detectives, magistrates and 93 interpreters, these district and regional
courts have been sitting late into the night to try cases linked to the
tournament — with impressive results.

Justice in South Africa has never been this quick: Two armed men rob
three foreign journalists at gunpoint Wednesday, police arrest them
Thursday and by Friday night they’ve been tried, convicted and begun
serving 15-year sentences.

The robbery at a hotel in Magaliesburg, west of Johannesburg, was one of
the most serious crimes so far involving foreign fans or media, many of
whom have marvelled at how safe they feel at Africa’s first World Cup.

“Despite the negative image of South Africa I’ve had no sense of
insecurity,” said Musa Mhlanga, a United States scientist of South
African origin, who had attended three games in five days.

Contributing to that sense of security is the uncommon zeal with which
crimes involving fans are being investigated and prosecuted.

In Cape Town, a woman who snatched the bag of a Japanese tourist was
arrested, tried and convicted a day later.

On Tuesday, police arrested three men within a few hours of four Chinese
journalists being robbed at their lodge in the north-eastern host city
of Nelspruit.

Within four days of kick-off, 20 cases had been brought before the
special courts for offences, including robbery, theft and fraud,
National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) spokesman Tlali Tlali told the
German Press Agency DPA Tuesday.

A small number of foreign visitors have also been nabbed, including a
Frenchman working for a broadcasting services company, who was arrested
for drink driving.

Of the 20 cases, at least four have been completed, earning the police
and courts praise in a country where some of the world’s highest rates
of crime go hand in glove with some of the lowest conviction rates.

“There is no bigger deterrent (to crime) than a successful prosecutorial
system,” according to Johan Berger, senior researcher on crime and
justice at the Pretoria-based Institute for Security Studies (ISS).

Berger hopes that the “special courts” template can be kept after the
World Cup to tackle the trio of crimes that have stubbornly resisted a
tougher approach on crime in recent years: house robberies, business
robberies and car-jacking.

South Africa is famous for its 50 murders a day but the country also
endures 18,000 house robberies each year and nearly 15,000 car-jackings.

A survey carried out by the ISS among 30 convicted house robbers showed
most had been involved in over 100 robberies before being arrested,
Berger said.

The success of the World Cup courts sends a message to criminals that
“the chances of getting away with crime is getting smaller,” he said.

Meanwhile, apart from the increased likelihood of getting caught,
criminals that target World Cup fans also face stiff sentences.

The 15-year sentences handed to the two African men convicted of robbing
two Portuguese and a Spanish journalists in their room in Magaliesburg
was the maximum sentence for the offence and unusual in a case where no
shots were fired.

The men have not yet indicated whether they will appeal the sentence,
Tlali said.

Five years for stealing 2010 tourist's cellphone

Over 25 cases heard in special courts

He was sentenced to five years in jail for stealing a cellphone - in a
trial that lasted less than 20 minutes.

Themba Makhubu, 22, who pleaded guilty to stealing a black HTC touch
phone from Argentinian Guilermo Louis Meinero in the Joburg CBD on
Wednesday this week, also received a tongue lashing.

"You knew of the negative media reports that South Africa is receiving
interna-tionally because of crime in this country," said magistrate Hein
Louw.

"You knew the man you stole from was not from here. If you had a
previous conviction, this court would not have hesitated to sentence you
to between 10 and 15 years in jail."

Then it was the turn of the prosecutor to weigh in after the case was
heard yesterday in one of the dedicated World Cup courts at the
Johannesburg Magistrate's Court.

"Because the eyes of the world are on us, this court has a duty to send
a strong message that these kinds of crimes will not be tolerated," she
told two Italian journalists inside court yesterday.

"At least he did not plan it or use force - it could have been worse."

In contrast, a Ugandan woman who was charged with the theft of a Samsung
cellphone in central Durban and pleaded guilty to the charge this week
was sentenced to 12 months in prison or a fine of R6 000.

The number of criminal cases heard in 56 dedicated World Cup courts
across the country rose to more than 25 yesterday, with some being
finalised instantly.

The National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) said most of the cases involved
foreigners.

There had been more than 10 convictions, with offences ranging from
fraud to assault, drunk driving and ticket touting, said NPA spokesman
Mthunzi Mhaga.

More than 100 magistrates, 260 prosecutors, 93 foreign language
interpreters, 110 language interpreters, 1 140 court officials and 327
court orderlies have been assigned to the courts.

• Last week, a Pretoria man was sentenced to 18 months for defrauding a
US citizen and a guesthouse owner.
• A French broadcast journalist, who spent two nights in a Durban jail
after being arrested and charged for drunk driving, was acquitted as
blood tests proved that he was in fact below the legal limit.
• In Mpumalanga, a case against six men accused of robbing Pine Inn
Hotel and one involving a 33-year-old Chilean soccer fan were postponed
to Monday in the KaBokweni Magistrate's Court.

• Four men allegedly stole Coca-Cola branded umbrellas worth over R5 000
at a fan park.
• A Cape Town vagrant has been fined R6 000 or 12 months in prison for
stealing a South Korean tourist's backpack.

Other World Cup-related cases heard before the special courts include:
• A Brazilian national, Wilson Soto Caldoron, is in custody for theft in
Cape Town;
• A Slovenian man was charged with drunk driving in Nelspruit;
• A Zimbabwean man was found with 47g of dagga in Musina.
• Last week, two Zimbabweans were sentenced to 15 years in prison for
robbing foreign journalists in Magaliesburg.
By Thabiso Thakali - Additional re



Xenophobia a 'credible threat'
GAYE DAVIS 23 June 2010

A FRESH wave of xenophobic violence in the wake of the World Cup appears
to be a "credible threat", and early warning systems need to be
strengthened, including a national hotline.

This is among a range of recommendations the Consortium for Refugees and
Migrants in South Africa (Cormsa) has sent to the inter-ministerial
committee that has the task of drawing up measures to prevent a repeat
of the surge of violence that claimed 62 lives two years ago.

The group said detection of threats needed to be strengthened by
gathering intelligence from all available sources

"This includes a centralised national contact number where people can
report threats or outbreaks of xenophobic violence, as the general 10111
number has proved insufficient for this."

While the police service's visible policing unit was setting up an early
warning system with civil society members and the UN, this needed to be
supported with "clear written directives through the chain of command on
the necessity to co-operate".

All threats and outbreaks of xenophobic violence needed to be condemned
by government leaders at national, provincial and local level.

"This is essential as some perpetrators... appear to believe they have
the tacit support of local political actors," Cormsa said.

While the office of the premier in the Western Cape had developed
capacity for conflict resolution, municipalities and other provinces
needed to do the same. Disaster management systems also needed
strengthening to allow for an improved and more consistent response.

"Local or district disaster management officials are not always able to
ensure access to food, shelter and other humanitarian resources once
people are displaced", the group said. Access to justice was also an issue.

"Perpetrators are often not held accountable, which results in a
perception of impunity for crimes against foreign nationals. In a number
of cases, victims... are intimidated to drop charges in return for
reintegration or are too afraid to press charge."

Cases should be fast-tracked, the group says.



A murderous mayhem is brewing
Jeremy Gordin (PoliticsWeb) 24 June 2010

Jeremy Gordin on disturbing undercurrents beneath the World Cup bonhomie

JOHANNESBURG - I was excited last evening when the fighters for freedom
(also known as the Great Satan, depending on your point of view)
defeated the "terrs" (aka Algeria).

First of all, I admire that lantern-jawed American coach, Bob Bradley,
father of the player, Michael. I don't know if Bob (and Michael) are
related to the long departed General of the Army, Omar Nelson Bradley,
but they ought to be. Bob is every inch a member of the US marine corps,
even if he's not. Look at him. The lantern jaw; the unflinching gaze.

As for the Algerians, how can I forgive them for what they did to the
colons? After all, my hero Albert Camus ("Always go too far, because
that's where you'll find the truth"), who played goalkeeper for the
University of Algiers, was a colon ...

Besides, I have long admired the American for their true grit, for their
staying power from Okinawa to Iraq and Afghanistan.

I was equally excited that Baffled Bafana, our national team, thumped
Arsenal's B team (aka the French national squad) ...

The froggie behaviour, including coach Raymond Domenech's refusal to
shake hands with Carlos Alberto Parreira after the game, really wasn't
cricket. I thought etiquette was a French word. But then faux pas is as
well, n'est pas?

But one of the oddest things to emerge from the world cup this week was
the comment allegedly made by Jacob G Zuma after the Bafana/Arsenal B
match on Tuesday night.

According to the report I heard, Zuma said that, now that Bafana are
out, we Seffricans must support the African teams, and if they all
disappear (as they might in the next 75 minutes - I'm writing this
during the German-Ghana game), then we must support the South Americans
because they're from the southern hemisphere, as are we.

And if the South Americans disappear (which they won't - but if they
do), then are we supposed to support the Europeans because they're the
only ones left? What is this? The old south-north struggle? The war of
the hemispheres? Sometimes JGZ should think before he speaks.

But enough football talk for the nonce.

Until recently, say four-five weeks ago, when my car radio gave up the
ghost, I spent a fair amount of time, while doing the early morning
school shuttle, listening to John "don't call me Robbie" Robbie on Radio
702 - carrying on about the possibility of new xenophobic attacks.

I have written "carrying on" because I found it irritating - and
irresponsible. Why keep putting things into people's heads if they
aren't there? Why raise issues that don't need raising? Why sew panic?

But it seems that I might have been the arse.

A focused look across the news of the last three weeks or so shows that
xenophobia has raised its ugly, ugly head again, so much so that the
government has re-established an inter-ministerial committee (IMC) to
deal with xenophobic attacks against foreigners during or soon after the
world cup.

"The IMC will liaise with civil society structures to ensure that a
country-wide approach is adopted to prevent any form of violence against
anyone," cabinet spokesperson Themba Maseko said.

"Government," he added, "would like to re-iterate that any attacks are
totally unacceptable and will not be tolerated. The law enforcement
agencies will not hesitate to act speedily and decisively against anyone
found to incite or participate in violent acts against foreign nationals."

Most chillingly - for me, anyway - was a conversation I had yesterday
with a Wits student who is part of the "2010 football newsroom" that I
am news editing at Wits' Journalism school (www.witsvuvuzela.2010.co.za).

She hails from Limpopo and went last weekend to visit some relatives
living in Diepsloot. There she interviewed some locals who said they
were going to "attack" foreigners as soon as the world cup was over.

I said to her that I wasn't happy with running a story in which
unidentified people made these "hate" claims about what they would do
later to foreigners living in their community.

"I mean, this is serious tuff we're talking about. The last time this
happened, there were 62 people murdered," I said.

"I know," she said - and then told me the background story to her
interviews.

She had encountered a huge crowd that had gotten hold of a young
Zimbabwean. Crowd members claimed they had caught him stealing soccer
tops from a vendor - and they beaten him to a pulp.

"Blood was running his face when they took him away, I was very
frightened," she said to me.

"Taking him where?" I asked.

"Some of the kids who went with the crowd told me later that he had been
killed. They told me that they were killing people like that Zimbabwean
almost every day."

"Weren't there any policemen around?" I asked.

"Yes," she replied, "they arrived later, after it was over. I believe
that what happens is that the police make sure that they arrive late in
Diepsloot. If they intervened and tried to save the victim, the crowd
would attack them - and they're frightened of that."

Her story had, alas, the ring of truth. It seems that while our police
are being coerced into worrying about young women in orange mini-skirts
or irascible English fans going to talk to their team in the changing
rooms, serious, murderous mayhem is brewing again.

Maybe we're not as far as we like to think from Saigon, Kabul or Baghdad
or from Algiers in the late 1950s.



South Africa: Cosatu to Protest At Mexico Matches
Alistair Anderson 22 June 2010

Johannesburg — THE Congress of South African Trade Unions (Cosatu) will
protest today against what it calls Mexico's "fascist treatment" of
labour unions.

Yesterday, Cosatu said there would be picketing outside Peter Mokaba
Stadium in Polokwane, where Mexico meet France, and in fan parks.

Cosatu said affiliates, the National Union of Mineworkers and the
National Union of Metalworkers of SA, wanted the Mexican government to
recognise trade unionist Napoleon Gomez Urrutia as head of Mexico's
largest mining union, drop corruption charges against him and other
union bosses, and unfreeze union funds.

The World Cup has been targeted as a platform for the protests. The
unions said yesterday another march outside the Rustenburg stadium would
take place when Mexico played its final group game against Uruguay.

The campaign would culminate with a day of labour action on June 28,
including a march on the Mexican embassy in SA.

"We have decided to use this occasion of the 2010 Fifa World Cup as a
platform to raise the plight of the workers and the poor in Mexico ,"
Cosatu spokesman Patrick Craven said.

However, labour analyst Tony Healy told Business Day he thought Cosatu
had "targeted Mexico" because of the international media attention on SA
during the World Cup.



Charges dropped over orange dresses
Sapa 22 June 2010

Some 36 women dressed up as Danish supporters in South Africa. Photo:
REUTERS

Charges have been dropped against two Dutch women accused of ambush
marketing at the World Cup over their orange dresses, the law firm
Bowman Gilfillan, said today.

“The State just withdrew the charges”, said spokesman Darren Olivier.

He did not elaborate on the grounds on which Barbara Castelein and Mirte
Nieuwpoort were let off.

The two were arrested last week after they and dozens of other women
stripped down to orange mini-dresses during the soccer match between
Denmark and the Netherlands, allegedly to market the Dutch brewery,
Bavaria. While all the women were questioned, only Castelein and
Nieuwpoort were arrested.

They appeared in the Johannesburg Magistrate’s Court on Wednesday on
charges under the SA Merchandise Marks Act. Their passports were taken
away and they were granted bail of R10,000 each.

Fifa accused them of being sent to orchestrate an ambush marketing
campaign as Bavaria was not an official World Cup sponsor.



Zuma confident World Cup will create jobs
Reuters 22 June 2010

South African President Jacob Zuma said today he was confident the
Soccer World Cup will boost job creation and economic growth in the country.

“The event itself has created such an opportunity that our economy is
not going to be of the same size after the 2010 World Cup. Certainly,
therefore, GDP will grow from where it has been,” Zuma said in an
interview with Reuters Insider television.

“We are confident that the employment numbers will grow.”

Analysts estimate that the month-long sporting event could add around
0,5 percentage points to South Africa’s GDP in 2010.

The government has spent around R40bn on infrastructure projects, and
billions more on upgrading roads and airports.

Zuma said some of the positive impacts from the World Cup will be job
creation and infrastructure development.

“We are very confident that after this, employment will go up”.

The South African president said threats of strike action during the
World Cup from unions were not directly targeted at the event as wage
negotiations and strikes traditionally took place each year around June
or July during the so-called “strike season”.

“It has been just a coincidence that this season (of strikes) happened
when the World Cup is here. It is not aimed at the World Cup,” Zuma said.



Finding use for new stadiums will prove an uphill
INGI SALGADO Business Report 22 June 2010

South Africa has spent nearly R20 billion building five soccer stadiums
and upgrading another five for the World Cup, but the total bill could
escalate if alternative uses for the venues do not bring in enough cash
to run operations.

Fears are mounting that local stadiums, especially those in smaller
cities, may incur substantial operating losses in the years ahead.

"It's going to be a tremendous challenge when you have as many new
stadiums as South Africa has," said Barry Pollen, the director of
Stadium Management South Africa, which has been appointed to run the
country's calabash-shaped Soccer City stadium in Johannesburg. "If there
is no population, then it will be very difficult to attract people."

Stan du Plessis, an economics professor at the University of
Stellenbosch, said it was "implausible" that the smaller new stadiums in
Nelspruit, Polokwane and Port Elizabeth would be able to cover their
operational costs, let alone provide a decent return on investment to
cover construction costs. "They don't have the crowds. The teams may be
there, but the question is if they have enough supporters. Premier
Soccer League attendance is low outside the very big clubs," he said.

So far, only four local stadiums - none of which were built from scratch
- are on track to remain productive assets after the last whistle is
blown next month.

Three of them, Ellis Park in Johannesburg, Loftus Versfeld in Pretoria
and Free State in Bloemfontein, have the support of established rugby
franchises that boast committed crowds.

The fourth, Soccer City, has opted not to secure a soccer tenant team
because it erodes its ability to host finals. But its future is
nevertheless more secure than its cousins in outlying areas because of
its status.

It will be rebranded as the National Stadium after the World Cup, and
will host a variety of sporting events, as well as conferences,
weddings, birthday bashes, funerals - "anything we can fit in", says Pollen.

But prospects at the other stadiums are less certain.

In Cape Town and Durban, authorities have thus far been unable to tempt
provincial rugby teams to sign on as anchor tenants at the R4.5bn Green
Point Stadium or the R3.1bn Moses Mabhida Stadium.

In the case of the KwaZulu-Natal Sharks, a 47-year lease at neighbouring
Kings Park stands in the way, while Western Province rugby's affiliated
clubs have voted to remain at the ground they own in Newlands because it
is commercially "more beneficial".



March to Dan Plato on Wednesday 23 June at 9 AM
AEC 22 June 2010

March to invite Dan Plato and FIFA to the Poor People’s World Cup

At the moment 1000 to 1500 residents from Blikkiesdorp and surrounding
communities are preparing themselves for tomorrow as they will march to
Dan Plato to hand over a memorandum. This march is organized by the
Delft Anti-Eviction Campaign to invite Dan Plato and FIFA to the finals
of the Poor People’s World Cup on July 4, 2010.

Furthermore, this march is to support all the displaced communities now
living in Blikkiesdorp (the Symphony Way TRA, 20 km away from the city
centre) as a result of World Cup regeneration projects. Many of these
residents were promised proper houses before moving to this
“concentration camp” with tin can structures – far away from the city
centre and from job opportunities, good education, their social
networks, etc.

In solidarity with these residents now living in this relocation area –
soccer teams, coaches and communities that are involved in the Poor
People’s World Cup – will also support and join this march tomorrow.

The Delft Anti-Eviction Campaign invites all the media to this march and
everyone who wants to support this march is more than welcome!!

Location: at 7 AM we will gather in Blikkiesdorp. The march will proceed
from Cape Town’s Keizersgracht (close to Cape Peninsula University) to
the Civic Centre to hand over a memorandum to Mayor Dan Plato.

For more information, please contact: Jane Roberts 0742384236 (AEC
coordinator for the Delft area), Kareema 078 6207365 (resident of
Blikkiesdorp) or Ashraf Cassiem 0761861408 (chairperson AEC)



FIFA World Cup 2010 - Accessibility
pureshpower.blogspot.com 17 June 2010

World Cup fever is definitely upon us! From the horrendous noise of the
Vuvuzelas to the expectations for the England team, we have all been
caught up in the spectacle of South Africa.

As a keen football supporter - a season ticket for Fulham FC - and a
member of the FA London Advisory Group, I am passionate about making
football inclusive for all. It is therefore disappointing to note that
The South African Disability Alliance Group has stated that thousands of
disabled people will not experience the 2010 FIFA World Cup live due to
a lack of seats.

All 10 World Cup stadiums were jointly meant to have over 2800 seats
allocated specifically for wheelchair spectators, but only just over a
1000 seats have been made available. The Cape Town Stadium was meant to
have 340 seats for disabled people but will only have 110. Phillip
Thompson, spokesman for The South African Disability Alliance Group has
said there had been minimal effort to increase access for the disabled -
“There are serious deficiencies in the various stadiums. There has been
no undertaking from any of the stadiums to actually meet these adjusted
figures. In Soccer City where we require 435 seats, it will be
impossible to achieve 297," says Thompson.

I am afraid that FIFA must accept some of the blame for this
unacceptable situation - they should have been monitoring the position
and taking action to ensure that the promises of accessibility were met
by South Africa. It is hoped that should England be successful in its
bid for the 2018 World Cup, more will be done to be truly inclusive.
Posted by Danny Puresh at 09:49
pureshpower.blogspot.com/



LOC 'insensitive' to disabled
Sada 28 May 2010

Cape Town – Two months after the South African Disability Alliance's
members (Sada) burnt wheelchair tyres near the headquarters of the World
Cup local organising committee (LOC) they remain dissatisfied.

Sada is still unhappy with the number of tickets made available to
people with disability and the readiness of facilities for them.

"To date we still do not have the appropriate facilities. We are in an
absolute state about it," Ari Seirlis told News24 adding that the
treatment people with disabilities had received from World Cup
organisers was “insensitive”.

According to him, most of the World Cup stadiums do not comply fully
with construction regulations in relation to people with disabilities.

"It's not just about ramps. You can have the ramps there. But is there
two-way traffic?" he said.

He said although a person with a disability would probably "survive"
using the toilets at the stadiums, the toilets did not meet regulation
standards.

The lift at the Moses Mabhida Stadium left people with disabilities no
room to manoeuvre once inside.

Seat allocation

Seirlis said another of the alliance's frustrations was that people with
disabilities had been "shorted" on their tickets.

"They tell us there is no demand, but there is. We just can't buy these
tickets," he said.

He pointed out that it was impossible for people with disabilities to
buy tickets, as not only were online sales closed, but FIFA ticketing
centres did not have tickets for people with disabilities and a
dedicated hotline was not working.

"I've got six pages of people who want to buy those tickets," he said.

According to FIFA regulations, at least 0.5% of all stadium seats must
be allocated to people with disabilities.

Only 88 seats at the 70 000 capacity Moses Mabhida stadium in
KwaZulu-Natal have been allocated for people with disabilities, he said.

"Where's our other 280 places?" a frustrated Seirlis said who said the
treatment people with disabilities was getting was “insensitive”.

Speaking to News24 on Friday, Parliament’s sports portfolio chairperson
Butana Khompela maintained that there had not been enough interest in
ticket sales to warrant more seat allocation.

Khompela was present at a portfolio meeting in Parliament where
consultant Phillip Thompson presented findings of inspections carried
out in all nine World Cup stadia.

Volunteers untrained

In a Sapa report on Friday, Thompson, who was appointed by the
tournament organisers, was quoted as saying hand rails at the Port
Elizabeth Stadium had the potential to “mortally” injure people as they
were sharp at the edges.

Khompela said that the railings were removed and had been replaced. He
had seen this himself on a recent “unannounced visit” following the meeting.

Seirlis said the community of people with disabilities was yet to be
advised about transport plans.

He said he found it shocking that FIFA volunteers had not been properly
trained to deal with people with disabilities even though this was part
of a memorandum of understanding signed in December 2009.

“They said they forgot about it,” said Seirlis.

According to him the volunteers were giving reading material “two weeks ago.

“That’s not training.”

The LOC was not immediately available for comment.

Seirlis warned that this could lead to human rights abuse complaints
from people with disabilities from around the world as the volunteers
were not properly trained.

He said he realised the alliance was running out of time with only two
weeks left before the World Cup kicks off.

“We're not just fighting for the World Cup. It’s about what’s left behind.”

He said it was unacceptable for newly constructed stadiums to be
non-compliant with building regulations and that it could possibly be
difficult to bring about change when the World Cup was over.

“If we are left behind in this World Cup, we’ll be left behind forever.”



CRIME SOARS WHILE FIFA SCORES
(Issued by the Umbilo Community Policing Forum – Sector 5 and the
Umbilo Action Group)

Communities living in the Umbilo, Glenwood, Glenmore and Carrington
Heights areas are incensed by the police’s enforced dereliction of
normal duties and patrols over the FIFA World Cup. Incidents of crime in
these suburbs are spiraling out of control and insufficient officers and
vehicles ensure that criminals have it easy while the stadiums and fan
parks on the beachfront are protected by a police ‘ring of steel’. The
recent match on 16 June saw over 4000 officers deployed for stadium
security, allegedly from as far afield as Northen KwaZulu-Natal and the
Cape, but in the southern suburbs, with the police away, the rats will
play - and they are making the most of it, despite obviously fabricated
reports that crime figures are down for this period.

At a community/police meeting on 18 May, Umbilo SAPS officers warned the
community that although leave had been prohibited during the World Cup,
extra officers would be on standby from the Brighton Beach Cluster and
patrol vehicles had been repaired in readiness; the deployment of
officers to police the stadiums, fan parks and beachfront, would pose a
challenge to regular policing in the suburbs, especially as a
displacement of crime from the city centre into the outlying areas was
predicted.

However, the community’s worst fears were realised on Friday night when
two hijackings (one at Davenport Centre) and a house breaking left
Umbilo SAPS overstretched and inadequately resourced and resulted in a
victim landing in hospital from a gunshot wound during one of the
hijackings. There were only 7 officers available to respond to these
serious crimes (2 of which were unpaid police reservists). At best there
are only 2 or 3 patrol vans available on any given night and although
the police are doing triple shifts, this is clearly insufficient for a
precinct that covers 23 square kilometres and has well over a million
people passing through daily. Even the safety of tourists staying in
local B&B’s cannot be guaranteed by the overstretched local police unit
and it appears that residences are also under the surveillance of
criminal elements watching as people vacate their homes to attend
matches, knowing they will have several uninterrupted looting hours at t
heir disposal.

Incidents of serious, violent crime have shot up throughout the area
with a marked increase in house breaking (both residential and
business), hijacking, robbery, car theft and drug related crimes proving
to be the worst. There has also been several reports of attempted and
actual child snatching from Wentworth, Seaview and the Bluff. However
while the media focuses on the disappearance of one Japanese tourist
(regrettable though it is), the recent kidnapping of a teenage Wentworth
girl from South Beach Fan Park hardly merited attention. The number of
email notices on community networks for missing South African children
are skyrocketing. Ayoba to the human traffickers!

Another alarming feature of the FIFA World Cup’s impact on community
safety was the arrest and interrogation last Monday of an Umbilo woman
for handing out innocuous pamphlets at a fan park which detailed
information for a Youth Day march protesting the negative effects of the
FIFA World Cup on South Africa, that had been officially sanctioned by
Metro Police. After accusing her of insightment, they took her to the
police station, confiscated the pamphlets and searched her vehicle in
case she was harbouring more material that could be damaging to FIFA’s
brand image. Furthermore, the recent heavy-handed use of stun grenades,
tear gas and rubber bullets on protesting security workers at the Moses
Mabhida stadium last Monday morning is indicative of the worrying trend
that while FIFA’s exclusion zones around stadia, fan parks and the
beachfront have been turned into an apartheid-era style police state, no
gives a hoot what criminal activity takes place in the r est of Durban.

The specially convened 2010 courts to expedite cases around the country
has since May 28 (according to the Mail & Guardian) cost the tax-payer
R45 million. These courts have processed a paltry 18 cases and resulted
in 8 convictions – each costing R1.75 million per conviction! Lawyers,
prosecutors and translators idle away their time, while the backlog of
unprocessed cases in the rest of the country goes back years.

The recent declaration by City Manager Dr Mike Sutcliffe of his intent
to motivate for Durban to host the next Olympic Games paralyses the
community with fear. We simply cannot afford the impact of another
mega-event on our under-resourced, under-trained police when communities
will still be reeling from the aftereffects of crime perpetrated during
the FIFA World Cup.

Yes, we feel it, we are waving our flags before they are stolen from out
of our hands!

Vanessa Burger
*Manager: Sector 5 Umbilo Community Policing Forum
*0828477766 vanessa@ion.co.za
200 Oliver Lea Dr Umbilo Durban
4001



Fifa Profits over South Africa at World Cup 2010
www.emmatrust.com 24 June 2010

Fifa announcement of record earnings of this years World Cup as income
is up 50% since last World Cup risks angering South Africa.

The announcement of the huge payday comes as the latest estimate for
staging the finals comes to $13 billion in a country where nearly half
the population live on less than $3 a day.

Forecasts predict profits in excess of $3.75 billion for the
Swiss-registered charity, which means THE charity will make more money
from the World Cup than the host country will.

TheSouth African economy main gain a 0.5% bump in GDP however this is
less that Fifa's profits equivalent to 0.7 per cent of GDP.

Despite the immense geopolitical power that Fifa wields, it is
accountable only to the courts in Switzerland, where it enjoys tax-free
status.

"It's completely wrong and deeply improper that Fifa is making money out
of this," said Stefan Szymanski, an economist at City University's Cass
Business School, who was called in to advise the South African
Government after it won the bid in 2004.

In the euphoria that followed the announcement six years ago that South
Africa had the cup, few questions were asked about the terms of the
deal. In private, government officials are now accusing Fifa of acting
like the "mafia" in sealing a one-sided licence to print money.

Under the terms of a confidential agreement with Fifa, the South African
Government takes no share of television, marketing deals or ticketing -
the main money spinners - and shoulders the cost of new stadiums and
related infrastructure.

In addition, Fifa earnings are protected by a specially created "tax
bubble" which means even the associated merchandising and match-day
events are untaxed.

Adrian Lackay, a spokesman for the South African Revenue Service, said
South Africa had paid a premium to Fifa to secure the World Cup, giving
away millions of dollars in potential taxes that Germany had not agreed
to when it hosted the 2006 tournament.

"This will not be a revenue-raising exercise for us," he said.

FIFA is only responsible for prize money paid to the teams along with
the cost of their travel and preparation, which amounted to just $279m
in Germany, where the tournament last took place, in 2006. This week
FIFA said it would contribute an extra $100m to the South Africans to
ensure that all the facilities are ready in time.

Yet the event’s main direct benefits, from television and marketing
rights, all go to FIFA. According to Citi, the research arm of Citibank,
FIFA’s profit in Germany came to $1.8 billion, equivalent to 0.7% of
South Africa’s GDP. FIFA will recycle much of that money into football
development worldwide. Nonetheless, even a bit of it would help clear up
some of the country’s festering shanty towns.

Nothing symbolises more graphically the ugliness that forms the backdrop
to the beautiful game than all the scandals, corruption and greed
surrounding the mega event on which the entire world's media is focused -

The 2010 World Cup. The first to be held on the African continent, it is
being presented as an opportunity to contribute to the development of
sport and the economy. Strifing to brighten up the fading colours of the
"Rainbow Nation", boosting "nation building", providing redress for
historical injustices, creating jobs and helping SA escape the effects
of the global recession and help the economy recover - a panacea for all
social and economic ills, this is not the case.

The government pleads financial constraints when it comes to delivery of
basic needs for their community like housing, access to health and
education. Yet it has found R30 billion to build stadiums and a further
R757 billion for infrastructure development. Failing to address the
continuing crisis of homelessness, local government has instead embarked
on quick "fixes" to hide street kids and other unwanted people.

Across South Africa, city authorities are busy with various "clean-up"
projects ahead of the 2010 World Cup. Johannesburg is entailing the
removal of 15 000 homeless people from the streets into temporary
shelters out of town so that "we can be up there with the rest of the
world" (City spokesperson Virgil James, Saturday Star 10/02/06). In
Durban, street children are rounded up by Metro Police on a daily basis
and dropped far outside the city; sometimes at "safe houses" or with
relatives, sometimes just on the roadside.

At the safe houses and shelters the children are kept with homeless
adults, and very vulnerable to abuse according to NGOs involved. Most
immediately find their way back to town. The trauma of the often brutal,
repeated arrests leaves the kids increasingly vulnerable to coping
mechanisms involving drugs etc, and disrupts rehabilitation programmes
run by NGOs, such as uMthombo which is teaching Durban street kids to
surf. (Mail and Guardian, 10/01/22)

The City of Cape Town is evicting poor people around the city from their
homes, rounding people up in Blikkiesdorp; what the City calls a
"Temporary Relocation Area" made up of 1 300 3x6m tin shacks in the
sand. People staying in informal settlements, hostels, squatting in
abandoned buildings, and in the latest development, refugees of the 2008
xenophobic pogroms, are being dumped here. Many were forced to
Blikkiesdorp as a direct result of staying too close to World Cup sites,
such as the Athlone stadium which will be used as a training ground. The
City's claims that the forced removals to Blikkiesdorp has nothing to do
with the World Cup ring hollow as many others waiting for houses have
been sidelined, brewing conflict. Blikkiesdorp is but one of countless
examples of forced removals of shack dwellers across the country as it
is airbrushed to according to FIFA's detailed instructions.

The World Cup "clean-ups" have also meant more police harassment of sex
workers. In times of recession, many had hoped for boosted incomes
during the World Cup. Instead, more policing of the streets means more
bribes to police officers, more arrests and more abuse and rape in the
police cells. Hopes had been raised partially by the possible
decriminalisation of prostitution following a review by the South
African Law Reform Commission which was released last year, suggesting
that prostitution may be partially or totally legalised, and regulated.
If the government goes ahead with such changes, it will not be before
2011, however.

While sex workers naturally hope that decriminalisation and regulation
by the government rather than organised crime will relieve them of
constant police harassment and stigma, and any such relief must be
supported, the implications of such law changes for women's status and
gender and class relations in general must be carefully examined also by
socialists, trade unions and social movements broadly. There is a risk
that government regulation, which was introduced in Germany ahead of its
2006 Soccer World Cup, legitimises the attachment of "for sale"-tags to
women's bodies in general, while decriminalisation does not
automatically remove social stigma and lower levels of police harassment
still leaves other problems, such as drug dependency and gender based
violence, unresolved.

Human trafficking, present-day slave trade, is an integral part of the
prostitution industry. Women and children from rural areas in SA, other
Southern African countries and Asia are recruited, often on false
pretenses, or abducted and forced to work, most commonly selling sex. In
response to the possibility of increased trafficking activity linked to
World Cup-tourism, Justice Minister Jeff Radebe now claims that the law
criminalising human trafficking, the drafting of which has been dragging
since 2003, is to be "fast-tracked" ahead of the June kick-off.

These issues are not going to be fixed by being removed from peoples
view points upon entering South Africa to see the World Cup. People
should be aware of the good and bad and that while they are enjoying the
luxuries of the football glory that children are dying from diseases on
the street across the town.
http://www.emmatrust.com



SWC bonanza passes many by
Mail & Guardian 20 July 2010

Johannesburg - Job-seekers by the thousands signed on for short-term
stints as World Cup security guards - only to go on strike early in the
tournament and lose those jobs in a bitter dispute over low wages.

Their protest received worldwide attention but it was just one of the
economic let-downs that have hit many, most out of the spotlight.

Windfall from the tournament has been an empty dream for fishermen,
street traders, souvenir and clothing manufacturers, even aspiring
innkeepers such as John Mafokoane.

Mafokoane's two guest rooms are cheerful, spotless - and unoccupied, a
daunting blow to the long-time Soweto resident who hoped to cash in on
the World Cup by converting his home into a bed-and-breakfast.

Mafokoane said he invested R120 000 on the project, but ran into
miscommunication and confusion while trying in vain to get the place
included on official accommodation lists.

The result, he said, "is highly disappointing" - no bookings for the
tournament even though the Soccer City is a short drive away.

"We thought this would be well-organised," he said. "Some promises were
not kept."

On nearby Vilakazi Street, a hub of Soweto tourism, Mzwandile Khoba had
a similar tale - investing R35 000 to renovate two guest rooms, signing
with an agency that promised to find guests, but ending out with no
bookings.

Match

"We don't hear from them," he said of the agency. "Things are not
turning out as we hoped."

World Cup organisers designated a company called Match to oversee
accommodations, and it helped market hotels and guest houses that passed
a review by tourism council.

Khoba was among numerous B-and-B owners in Soweto who found the
requirements too onerous and did not get his guest house listed.

His story can be seen as an economic microcosm of the World Cup.
Football's top event has been very much a mixed bag economically, with
big-time winners and many others who miss out.

FIFA has reported $3.2bn in income during the four-year run-up to the
2010 event, from sponsorships, licensing and TV rights. Rental car
companies are solidly booked.

Strategically located pubs are booming. The various producers of
vuvuzelas - the noisy plastic horns favoured by fans - are making a bundle.

But the government spent several billion dollars on new and renovated
infrastructure, and won't recoup that investment in the short term.

Some companies and unions were angered at the contracts for World Cup
merchandise that went to manufacturers abroad; even the toy versions of
the tournament mascot, Zakumi, were produced for a while in China to the
wrath of labour activists.

American sponsors

Additional controversies have involved the ubiquitous street traders,
whose makeshift pavement stands offer everything from mealie snacks to
intricate carvings.

Many traders had hoped for a bonanza catering to World Cup spectators
but are being barred from FIFA-enforced "exclusion zones" around the
stadiums - which are, for the most part, reserved for official sponsors
like McDonalds, Coca-Cola and Budweiser.

An organisation called StreetNet campaigned ahead of the World Cup, with
mixed success, to ease the restrictions so more traders could benefit.
In some cases, said StreetNet's Pat Horne, officials announced that
exclusion zones would be open to some traders - then imposed operating
fees that were too high for many of them.

"These kind of announcements are disingenuous," she said.

"Poor vendors can't take those opportunities."

In Horne's home city, Durban, many vendors and subsistence fishermen
have been evicted from a pier and beach front area that has been
redeveloped for the World Cup.

With groups such as Amnesty International taking up the street traders'
cause, FIFA has strived to sound empathetic.

"FIFA is not targeting this sector and is letting the host cities run
their own informal trading programme," the FIFA press office said in an
email.

Boost GDP

"FIFA just wants that no counterfeits are sold and that the area
directly surrounding the stadium is not used, but otherwise it is up to
the host cities to regulate this form of trading."

Unquestionably, the World Cup will have some positive impact on the
economy. It helped boost the gross domestic product over the past four
years, spawned huge transportation improvements, and is providing a
global TV showcase that might help expand future tourism.

Also, according to estimates by UBS Investment Research, it has created
more than 330 000 jobs. But many of those were temporary and low-paid,
such as the short-lived jobs for the striking security stewards at World
Cup stadiums.

The strikers said they were offered half the pay they were initially
promised - R190 or less for shifts of 12 hours or more.

Some strikers in Johannesburg said they were unable to get home after
late-night shifts and spent frigid nights at bus stations.

"We want to put it in our memory that we enjoyed the World Cup, but we
need to eat," said Denis Manganye one of the strikers.

In Durban, where the strikers clashed with police, community organiser
Desmond D'Sa said the protest was remarkable, given the World Cup
fervour and South Africa's official jobless rate of 25%.

"There people must be so desperate, knowing they're going up against the
national mood and a very tough police force," he said.

Spoilsports

"They risk being depicted as the spoilsports of the World Cup because
they've had it up to here."

D'Sa said the strikers shared a common plight with many other South
Africans hired for World Cup jobs - in effect, they were hired as
freelance, temporary workers rather than having a formal contract.

"The spread of a system of casualisation has made workers very
vulnerable," he said.

Patrick Craven, the spokesperson for the Congress of South African Trade
Unions, said the World Cup had shed light on long-running inequities
between rich and poor in this developing nation.

"South Africa has all sorts of problems," he said.

"They started long before the World Cup and will continue long afterwards."



World Cup: Fifa to rake in billions
NATASHA MARRIAN 18 June 2010

World football governing body Fifa expects its provisional income for
the 2010 World Cup to be about $3,2-billion (about R24-billion), a
spokesperson said on Friday.

The provisional figure was given in reply to a question at a media
briefing at Soccer City in Johannesburg.

Spokesperson Nicolas Maingot said the World Cup was the main source of
income for Fifa, and its revenue from this World Cup would tide it over
for the next four years.

He added that 75% of its revenue would be invested into football
development.

The estimate comes after it was reported that South Africa, which spent
about R63-billion on hosting the event, has granted Fifa a number of tax
concessions.

A Sunday paper reported that the world soccer body would cause the
country to lose "tens or possibly hundreds of millions of rands in
potential revenue".

It reported that the South African Revenue Service had been forced to
agree to a "tax bubble" around Fifa sites, which would exempt the soccer
federation from paying value-added tax, income tax and customs duties.

South Africa reportedly gave Fifa guarantees, including a supportive
financial environment by waiving customs duties, taxes and levies on the
import and export of goods belonging to the Fifa delegation, its
commercial affiliates, broadcast rights holders, media and spectators,
and the unrestricted import and export of all foreign currencies into
and from South Africa.

The guarantees also included ownership of all media, marketing and
intellectual property and that Fifa cannot be sued for claims arising
from the staging of the tournament.

Fifa has taken a tough stance against ambush marketing, taking Dutch
brewery Bavaria to task after it allegedly orchestrated a campaign at
the World Cup match between The Netherlands and Denmark on Monday. Two
womwn have already appeared in court on charges related to the South
African Merchandise Marks Act.

Industrial action
Meanwhile, local organising committee (LOC) spokesperson Rich Mkhondo
would not be drawn on what the extra cost of deploying police officers
at various stadiums would be.

This was after security guards at various stadiums downed tools over wages.

He refused to be drawn on the security debacle facing the World Cup
stadiums across the country.

"There is a dispute between parties. Once we get involved in a public
debate, the issues get escalated," Mkhondo said.

"We are trying to resolve all these issues ... we are not going to do
that publicly."

Five World Cup stadiums have been hit by industrial action since the
commencement of the tournament last Friday.

Initially the strike involved only one service provider, Stallion
security. However, guards from the Fidelity Security Company also
entered the fray on Thursday.

"In our agenda there are no security issues," Mkhondo said.

This after the Mail & Guardian on Friday reported that police were
investigating claims that sabotage by rival security companies was at
the root of the industrial action.

The M&G said it established that the government would have to foot a
bill exceeding R100-million to pay the police officers. This expense was
"supposedly" covered by Fifa and the LOC, the report said. -- Sapa



Vuvuzelas a gold mine for China manufacturers
BEIJING, CHINA 18 June 2010

The vuvuzelas providing the ear-splitting soundtrack for the Soccer
World Cup in South Africa are proving a gold mine for manufacturers in
China and a hit with buyers in the Asian nation.

Sales of the braying plastic horns both in China and other parts of the
world have soared, with manufacturers struggling to keep up with demand
and supplies selling out on some Chinese websites.

China's state-run Global Times said nearly 90% of South Africa's
vuvuzelas -- whose bee-swarm buzz at World Cup matches has triggered
complaints from fans, players and broadcasters alike -- are produced in
China.

One company, the Jiying Plastic Product based in the eastern province of
Zhejiang, sold more than one million of the horns in the first four
months of the year, mainly to South Africa, and the orders keep coming in.

"We plan to produce 300 000 to 500 000 more through the end of the World
Cup," said Wu Yijun, the firm's general manager.

The company produces 37 types of vuvuzela, at a wholesale price of about
two yuan (29 US cents) apiece, he said.

Chinese fans and merchants are also getting into the craze.

"Starting from May, we received domestic orders for about 150 000
vuvuzelas. Before that, all the vuvuzelas we produced were for export,"
Wu said.

"The World Cup frenzy has greatly driven our business, and we expect
revenue will jump more than 100% this year from a year earlier."

According to Huicong Plastic, a Chinese website that provides news on
the plastics industry, manufacturers in toy-making hub Chenghai in the
southern province of Guangdong have made "several million" vuvuzelas.

Chenghai toy manufacturers were quoted as saying that factories were
working overtime to meet World Cup demand.

"We expect that even after the end of the World Cup, South Africa will
still need vuvuzelas, and other countries will also add to vuvuzela
orders," the report said.

Meanwhile, vuvuzela sales have been brisk on Taobao, the Chinese
equivalent of eBay, with some individual merchants on the website
selling out of thousands of the trumpets, at prices averaging around 20
yuan each. - AFP



World Cup security shambles
ADRIAAN BASSON AND NIREN TOLSI 18 June 2010

Police are investigating claims that sabotage by rival security
companies lies behind the massive security guard strikes that rocked the
World Cup this week.

The Mail & Guardian has reliably learned that police crime intelligence
is probing the possibility that one or more security companies that lost
out on the tender to provide protection services to the tournament may
have instigated the protests.

The strikes, which prompted the dismissal of workers on Thursday, led to
the police taking over the entire security operation at Soccer City and
Ellis Park in Johannesburg, Green Point stadium in Cape Town and Moses
Mabhida stadium in Durban.

The M&G has further established that:

* Government will now have to fork out well over R100-million to
remunerate police officers who have assumed responsibility for stadium
security -- an expense supposedly covered by Fifa and the local
organising committee (LOC);

* These police officers, a number of whom are still trainees, may
not have the necessary crowd control training needed to protect events
like the World Cup; and

* Stallion Security, the security company whose workers went on
strike, lost their international partner, Securitas from Sweden, earlier
this year when they pulled out of the tournament, apparently following
financial disputes.

The South African Police Service had to step in to protect another Fifa
tournament in June last year, after the LOC and Stallion fell out over
money shortly before the Confederations Cup was about to start.

At the time the M&G reported that a consortium comprising Stallion,
Securitas and local black empowerment company Seana Marena was
originally awarded the tender to protect Confederations Cup matches, but
withdrew when the LOC offered to pay only R300 for a 12-hour shift.

At the time Stallion chief executive Clive Zulberg confirmed that the
company's offer was considerably more than budgeted for by the LOC.

An M&G source with intimate knowledge of the security plans for the
Confederations Cup and the World Cup placed the current problems
squarely at the door of the LOC and Fifa.

The source said that at the debriefing with the National Joint
Operations intelligence structures and the LOC after the Confederations
Cup, "major concerns" were raised.

These included the late signing of contracts between the LOC and private
security firms to guard stadiums; the Stallion dispute with the LOC over
salaries; and the inadequate training and stadium orientation of
security guards.

Said the source: "The thinking at the debriefing was that none of this
should be allowed to happen again, but it seems lessons have not been
learned."

According to the Fifa safety guidelines, the match organiser, in this
case the LOC and Fifa itself, is responsible for safety at stadiums on
the day of matches.

LOC spokesperson Rich Mkhondo refused to acknowledge this, saying: "I
will not answer questions about stadium security. Ask somebody else."

The M&G has learned that Stallion agreed to provide security at South
Africa's four major stadiums for the World Cup at even lower tariffs,
culminating in thousands of security guards going on strike this week.
Stallion's tender with the LOC is said to be worth about R60-million.

Although the R190 per 12-hour shift Stallion pays to security guards is
higher than the minimum prescribed rate of about R140 per shift,
security guards were left with the impression they would be paid more
than "normal" rates because of the tournament's status.

Insiders told the M&G that security guards working at big sporting
events like Super 14 rugby matches are paid between R350 and R400 for a
three-hour shift.

South African Transport and Allied Workers' Union general secretary
Zenzo Mahlangu, whose union represents many of the security guards --
even though they are not unionised -- said that information from the
union's interactions with workers was that "many of them" were employed
on an "ad hoc and casual basis".

"It seems to be a case of profiteering -- many of these guys had no
contracts signed or wages stipulated," said Mahlangu. He added: "The LOC
has been casual about security for this huge tournament, which means
many of these guys are not properly trained and there has been no real
vetting of them for criminal records. This is a criminal offence."

Initially, it was suggested that the trade unions had spread false
rumours about Stallion's pay offer to workers to provoke strike action.

The unions were accused of spreading false rumours about the rate
Stallion had promised workers. But attention has now shifted to rival
security firms that allegedly told security guards they were being
ripped off.

By Thursday it remained unclear whether the LOC or Fifa would reimburse
the police and, by implication, the South African government for
R100-million spent on police security at the four stadiums.

Mkhondo refused to comment or say whether Stallion would face penalties
for failing to provide services.

Police spokesperson Sally de Beer was quoted in the Times on Thursday
saying police officers would be paid R700 per shift. Given Stallion's
rate of R190 per shift, this will dramatically raise the cost of
protecting the four major stadiums for the duration of the tournament.

Also of concern is the ability of police officers now required to do the
work of stewards and security guards.

Fifa's safety guideline, of which the M&G has a copy, explicitly
stipulates that stewards should have experience of securing football
matches.

A senior police officer said that trainee police officers do not
necessarily undergo crowd-control training and that this is a specialist
area.
Security analysts have also raised concerns about "learning gaps" that
police trainees may have and the effect of the deployment of large
numbers of operational police officers to stadiums on the broader safety
of citizens.

The M&G is still awaiting all the LOC's tender documentation, including
its contract with Stallion, that it was compelled to hand over to the
paper after the recent ruling by the South Gauteng High Court.



World Cup security shambles
ADRIAAN BASSON AND NIREN TOLSI 18 June 2010

Police are investigating claims that sabotage by rival security
companies lies behind the massive security guard strikes that rocked the
World Cup this week.

The Mail & Guardian has reliably learned that police crime intelligence
is probing the possibility that one or more security companies that lost
out on the tender to provide protection services to the tournament may
have instigated the protests.

The strikes, which prompted the dismissal of workers on Thursday, led to
the police taking over the entire security operation at Soccer City and
Ellis Park in Johannesburg, Green Point stadium in Cape Town and Moses
Mabhida stadium in Durban.

The M&G has further established that:

* Government will now have to fork out well over R100-million to
remunerate police officers who have assumed responsibility for stadium
security -- an expense supposedly covered by Fifa and the local
organising committee (LOC);

* These police officers, a number of whom are still trainees, may
not have the necessary crowd control training needed to protect events
like the World Cup; and

* Stallion Security, the security company whose workers went on
strike, lost their international partner, Securitas from Sweden, earlier
this year when they pulled out of the tournament, apparently following
financial disputes.

The South African Police Service had to step in to protect another Fifa
tournament in June last year, after the LOC and Stallion fell out over
money shortly before the Confederations Cup was about to start.

At the time the M&G reported that a consortium comprising Stallion,
Securitas and local black empowerment company Seana Marena was
originally awarded the tender to protect Confederations Cup matches, but
withdrew when the LOC offered to pay only R300 for a 12-hour shift.

At the time Stallion chief executive Clive Zulberg confirmed that the
company's offer was considerably more than budgeted for by the LOC.

An M&G source with intimate knowledge of the security plans for the
Confederations Cup and the World Cup placed the current problems
squarely at the door of the LOC and Fifa.

The source said that at the debriefing with the National Joint
Operations intelligence structures and the LOC after the Confederations
Cup, "major concerns" were raised.

These included the late signing of contracts between the LOC and private
security firms to guard stadiums; the Stallion dispute with the LOC over
salaries; and the inadequate training and stadium orientation of
security guards.

Said the source: "The thinking at the debriefing was that none of this
should be allowed to happen again, but it seems lessons have not been
learned."

According to the Fifa safety guidelines, the match organiser, in this
case the LOC and Fifa itself, is responsible for safety at stadiums on
the day of matches.

LOC spokesperson Rich Mkhondo refused to acknowledge this, saying: "I
will not answer questions about stadium security. Ask somebody else."

The M&G has learned that Stallion agreed to provide security at South
Africa's four major stadiums for the World Cup at even lower tariffs,
culminating in thousands of security guards going on strike this week.
Stallion's tender with the LOC is said to be worth about R60-million.

Although the R190 per 12-hour shift Stallion pays to security guards is
higher than the minimum prescribed rate of about R140 per shift,
security guards were left with the impression they would be paid more
than "normal" rates because of the tournament's status.

Insiders told the M&G that security guards working at big sporting
events like Super 14 rugby matches are paid between R350 and R400 for a
three-hour shift.

South African Transport and Allied Workers' Union general secretary
Zenzo Mahlangu, whose union represents many of the security guards --
even though they are not unionised -- said that information from the
union's interactions with workers was that "many of them" were employed
on an "ad hoc and casual basis".

"It seems to be a case of profiteering -- many of these guys had no
contracts signed or wages stipulated," said Mahlangu. He added: "The LOC
has been casual about security for this huge tournament, which means
many of these guys are not properly trained and there has been no real
vetting of them for criminal records. This is a criminal offence."

Initially, it was suggested that the trade unions had spread false
rumours about Stallion's pay offer to workers to provoke strike action.

The unions were accused of spreading false rumours about the rate
Stallion had promised workers. But attention has now shifted to rival
security firms that allegedly told security guards they were being
ripped off.

By Thursday it remained unclear whether the LOC or Fifa would reimburse
the police and, by implication, the South African government for
R100-million spent on police security at the four stadiums.

Mkhondo refused to comment or say whether Stallion would face penalties
for failing to provide services.

Police spokesperson Sally de Beer was quoted in the Times on Thursday
saying police officers would be paid R700 per shift. Given Stallion's
rate of R190 per shift, this will dramatically raise the cost of
protecting the four major stadiums for the duration of the tournament.

Also of concern is the ability of police officers now required to do the
work of stewards and security guards.

Fifa's safety guideline, of which the M&G has a copy, explicitly
stipulates that stewards should have experience of securing football
matches.

A senior police officer said that trainee police officers do not
necessarily undergo crowd-control training and that this is a specialist
area.
Security analysts have also raised concerns about "learning gaps" that
police trainees may have and the effect of the deployment of large
numbers of operational police officers to stadiums on the broader safety
of citizens.

The M&G is still awaiting all the LOC's tender documentation, including
its contract with Stallion, that it was compelled to hand over to the
paper after the recent ruling by the South Gauteng High Court.



World Cup: Fifa to rake in billions
NATASHA MARRIAN | JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA 18 June 2010

World football governing body Fifa expects its provisional income for
the 2010 World Cup to be about $3,2-billion (about R24-billion), a
spokesperson said on Friday.

The provisional figure was given in reply to a question at a media
briefing at Soccer City in Johannesburg.

Spokesperson Nicolas Maingot said the World Cup was the main source of
income for Fifa, and its revenue from this World Cup would tide it over
for the next four years.

He added that 75% of its revenue would be invested into football
development.

The estimate comes after it was reported that South Africa, which spent
about R63-billion on hosting the event, has granted Fifa a number of tax
concessions.

A Sunday paper reported that the world soccer body would cause the
country to lose "tens or possibly hundreds of millions of rands in
potential revenue".

It reported that the South African Revenue Service had been forced to
agree to a "tax bubble" around Fifa sites, which would exempt the soccer
federation from paying value-added tax, income tax and customs duties.

South Africa reportedly gave Fifa guarantees, including a supportive
financial environment by waiving customs duties, taxes and levies on the
import and export of goods belonging to the Fifa delegation, its
commercial affiliates, broadcast rights holders, media and spectators,
and the unrestricted import and export of all foreign currencies into
and from South Africa.

The guarantees also included ownership of all media, marketing and
intellectual property and that Fifa cannot be sued for claims arising
from the staging of the tournament.

Fifa has taken a tough stance against ambush marketing, taking Dutch
brewery Bavaria to task after it allegedly orchestrated a campaign at
the World Cup match between The Netherlands and Denmark on Monday. Two
womwn have already appeared in court on charges related to the South
African Merchandise Marks Act.

Industrial action
Meanwhile, local organising committee (LOC) spokesperson Rich Mkhondo
would not be drawn on what the extra cost of deploying police officers
at various stadiums would be.

This was after security guards at various stadiums downed tools over wages.

He refused to be drawn on the security debacle facing the World Cup
stadiums across the country.

"There is a dispute between parties. Once we get involved in a public
debate, the issues get escalated," Mkhondo said.

"We are trying to resolve all these issues ... we are not going to do
that publicly."

Five World Cup stadiums have been hit by industrial action since the
commencement of the tournament last Friday.

Initially the strike involved only one service provider, Stallion
security. However, guards from the Fidelity Security Company also
entered the fray on Thursday.

"In our agenda there are no security issues," Mkhondo said.

This after the Mail & Guardian on Friday reported that police were
investigating claims that sabotage by rival security companies was at
the root of the industrial action.

The M&G said it established that the government would have to foot a
bill exceeding R100-million to pay the police officers. This expense was
"supposedly" covered by Fifa and the LOC, the report said. -- Sapa



Vuvuzelas a gold mine for China manufacturers
BEIJING, CHINA 18 June 2010

The vuvuzelas providing the ear-splitting soundtrack for the Soccer
World Cup in South Africa are proving a gold mine for manufacturers in
China and a hit with buyers in the Asian nation.

Sales of the braying plastic horns both in China and other parts of the
world have soared, with manufacturers struggling to keep up with demand
and supplies selling out on some Chinese websites.

China's state-run Global Times said nearly 90% of South Africa's
vuvuzelas -- whose bee-swarm buzz at World Cup matches has triggered
complaints from fans, players and broadcasters alike -- are produced in
China.

One company, the Jiying Plastic Product based in the eastern province of
Zhejiang, sold more than one million of the horns in the first four
months of the year, mainly to South Africa, and the orders keep coming in.

"We plan to produce 300 000 to 500 000 more through the end of the World
Cup," said Wu Yijun, the firm's general manager.

The company produces 37 types of vuvuzela, at a wholesale price of about
two yuan (29 US cents) apiece, he said.

Chinese fans and merchants are also getting into the craze.

"Starting from May, we received domestic orders for about 150 000
vuvuzelas. Before that, all the vuvuzelas we produced were for export,"
Wu said.

"The World Cup frenzy has greatly driven our business, and we expect
revenue will jump more than 100% this year from a year earlier."

According to Huicong Plastic, a Chinese website that provides news on
the plastics industry, manufacturers in toy-making hub Chenghai in the
southern province of Guangdong have made "several million" vuvuzelas.

Chenghai toy manufacturers were quoted as saying that factories were
working overtime to meet World Cup demand.

"We expect that even after the end of the World Cup, South Africa will
still need vuvuzelas, and other countries will also add to vuvuzela
orders," the report said.

Meanwhile, vuvuzela sales have been brisk on Taobao, the Chinese
equivalent of eBay, with some individual merchants on the website
selling out of thousands of the trumpets, at prices averaging around 20
yuan each. - AFP



Threats against foreigners, whites soar

After South African team’s second loss in the WC2010, the Facebook pages
are awash with calls to ‘kill all foreigners..’ including Bafana-coach
Pereira.

On June 17 2010 - hundreds of messages by black South African Facebook
members provide considerable proof that there are widespread plans for a
massive ethnic-cleansing campaign – and that the foreign tourists are
also included in these plans. Many black foreigners in South Africa have
been warning for several months that such attacks are afoot, as they are
again being threatened in the same organised manner just before the
horrific xenophobic violence broke out in May 2009 – which displaced
hundreds of thousands of foreign blacks and killed hundred, often large
youth gangs roamed the townships and torched these people inside their
homes if they didn’t flee fast enough…

Nene Sanele Facebook

As one Witwatersrand student, Sanele Nene, left, writes on June 17 2010
on Facebook: “It’s time to start our xenophobic attacks on every
foreigner in this country, the world cup is over for us so they must
voertsek…’

Many others, such as Khavi Mavodze also write: “… foreigners leave our
country (…) be warned, xenophobia is our first name…’ Joshua Irwin
writes: “let the xenophobia commence, bloody agents Uruguayans, I am
gonna set Malema on your asses.’

Sanele Nene writes below: “Yes it is the time that all South Africans
have been waiting for. It’s time to start our xenophobic attacks on
every foreigner in this country, the world cup is over four us so they
must voertsek*, no more friendly South Africa, it’s time four us to show
them what Mzansi is really good at… Abahambe bonke..’ Solomzi Marawu
agreed, writing “That’s true they must get out for sure.’’

* (Voertsek: *Afrikaans word derived from ‘voort sê ek’ – often used to
chase away dogs)

Khavi Mavodze writes (second picture below) : “The World (cup) is over
please foreigners leave our country and take your brother Perreira
along, we don’t care even if his bank account is loaded with South
African money, as for you ref, be warned, xenophobia is our first name…’
Percy Masete agrees, writing: ‘if we don’t make it to the next round,
all the foreigners must go…’

Nene Sanela TimeToStartOurXenophobicAttacksEveryForeignerJune172010Facebook

Chibeleka Tundo Oxide June17_NowLetXenophiaStart

Masethe Percy Threat All Visitors Must Go WC2010 or we go xenophobic
again June172010

Allot Baloyi writes below: “tomorrow we start the xenophobic attacks.
Ja-nee my boys lost ‘crying’. I’m still proudly SA”. We are going to
steal the cup it ain’t leaving this country ‘evil grin’. Fana Lebotha
III writes: “Steal it! It is here. Fk Bafana Bafana. Every tourist owes me.’

Baloyi Allot June172010 Tomorrow We start Xenophobic attacks Facebook

Tshofolelo Busta Mokgobi writes: “… I think we can start the xenophobic
attacks now, instead of after the world cup. ‘

Mokgobi Tsholofelo Busta, We start xenophobic attacks now instead of
after WC2010June172010

Tebogo Kingsley Nterejane writes below: “If we lose a second time I say
xenophobic attacks all these people must voertsek before sunrise..’

Nterejane Tebogo Kingsley Xenophobic attacks plan June 172010 Facebook

Gobizizwe Shange writes below that he’s at a construction site with
Zimbabweans and ‘they are worried about xenophobic attacks on 12 July,
since South Africa lost last night, say South Africans will take out
their anger on them’.
http://afrikaner-genocide-achives.blogspot.com/

Ngwende Rodrick SA beaten xenophobia getting nearer June172010



Stadium security firm says soccer bosses lied about pay
Quinton Mtyala 18 June 2010

STALLION Security has accused the World Cup local organising committee
of lying in its claim that it had played no role in determining the rate
of pay for security guards at World Cup stadiums.

Stallion Security has confirmed that its contract to provide stewards at
four stadiums had been cancelled by the local organising committee. Rich
Mkhondo of the local organising committee said: "I have nothing to say
about this matter."

Stallion chief executive Clive Zulberg, speaking after three days of
conflict, said payment to its staff was determined by the local
organising committee on rates prescribed by the industry regulator.

"In fact, in respect of match day guards, Stallion successfully
negotiated the local organising committee upwards to time-and-a-half on
the Private Security Industry Regulatory Authority (PSIRA) tariff.

"Stallion understands that the local organising committee has made
various public statements to the effect that it played no role in
determining the rate of remuneration payable to Stallion's guards for
the World Cup. That is false. The PSIRA-linked rates were determined at
the local organising committee's insistence," said Zulberg.

He said the company was "mystified" by some of the high rates being
claimed by security guards, some claiming they were promised as much as
R500 for a 12-hour shift.

"We deeply regret the circumstances that have arisen, and the job losses
suffered by the majority of the security guards as a result of
incitement by a few," he said.

Zulberg again hinted there would be legal action against the committee.
Last June the company withdrew its services two weeks before the
kick-off to the Confederations Cup due to a disagreement with the local
organising committee over security guard payment.

The Mail & Guardian reported at the time that the local organising
committee had offered to pay only R300 per security guard for a 12-hour
shift, but this had been rejected by Stallion who claimed it was below
the going rate for security guards at big sporting events.

Some stewards claimed they earned as little as R90 per 12-hour shift,
while most were paid R205.

Two security contractors whose staff were seconded to Stallion said it
should not have been awarded the security contract by the local
organising committee. Speaking on condition that they were not named,
they said they were approached by Stallion in March to provide stewards
for the matches.

"The guards would be "transferred" to Stallion but we would manage and
pay them," said one owner who is still awaiting payment from Stallion.
Another company head said Stallion had failed to pay its staff properly.

Yesterday the DA called for Linda Mti, security chief for the local
organising committee, to be held to account for the "organisational
breakdown" that led to the walkout by security guards. Spokeswoman
Dianne Kohler Barnard said security at the stadiums had been excellent
but the "sudden emergence of wage disputes poses a real problem".



Security company enters stadium row
The Mercury 17 June 2010

Johannesburg - The contract to provide security for four of the World
Cup stadiums was cancelled by the security company Stallion, and not
Fifa, the company said on Thursday.

Stallion Security chief executive Clive Zulberg confirmed via a public
relations firm that the company had cancelled the contract.

"A dispute has now arisen between Stallion and the LOC (Fifa Local
Organising Committee), resulting in the agreement between Stallion and
the LOC being cancelled," said Zulberg in an earlier statement.

"We cannot comment on the merits of the dispute at this stage, as it is
likely to become litigious."

The cancellation of the contract to provide security services to the
Cape Town Stadium, Moses Mabhida Stadium in Durban, and at Ellis Park
and Soccer City in Johannesburg, came after a series of strikes by
security personnel.

Guards at the Moses Mabhida stadium started striking on Monday night,
demanding more money. They had to be dispersed by police.

The strikes spread to the other stadiums controlled by Stallion during
the week and police had to fire stun grenades and rubber bullets at
striking workers at the Cape Town Stadium on Thursday.

Zulberg said the salary rates of the staff were determined by the LOC.

"Stallion understands that the LOC has made various public statements to
the effect that it played no role in determining the rate of
remuneration payable to Stallion's guards for the 2010 Fifa World Cup.
That is false," said Zulberg.

"The Psira (Private Security Industry Regulatory Authority) linked rates
were determined at the LOC's insistence," he said.

"In fact, in respect of match-day guards, Stallion successfully
negotiated the LOC upwards to time-and-a-half on the Psira tariff."

Zulberg said a confidentiality clause prevented the company from
divulging any specifics on the contract between them and Fifa, including
the reason why the contract was cancelled.

The LOC declined to comment.

"We have nothing to say about this matter," said LOC spokesperson Rich
Mkhondo in an SMS. - Sapa



Police cash in World Cup bonanza for officers
COLLEEN DARDAGAN, BRONWYN GERRETSEN & SAPA 18 June 2010

POLICE officers doing World Cup duty in Durban are cashing in on
overtime and extra daily bonuses, with the potential to earn tens of
thousands of rands by the time the tournament is over.

Both metro and SAPS officers are undertaking extra duties, either
handling security at the Moses Mabhida Stadium or escorting teams around
Durban.

The 120 metro police officers involved in escorting convoys and route
protection earn overtime at a rate of R60 to R120 an hour, depending on
rank, while SAPS officers are paid a daily rate of R700 for World Cup
duties.

With about 4 000 police officers estimated to have been securing the
stadium on Wednesday night, the bill for just that day's work could be
close to R3 million.

A metro police officer waiting to escort the Swiss and Spanish teams
from the stadium on Wednesday night said he would work at least 300
hours' overtime during the World Cup, earning about R30 000.

However, officers based at police stations are bitter that they cannot
also earn extra cash during this period.

Metro police spokesman Steve Middleton said personnel were working lots
of overtime in shifts and were paid based on their rank and tasks.

Middleton said the officers escorted soccer teams around Durban and
protected the teams' base camps in the city.

The overtime would be paid from the eThekwini municipality's 2009/10
general budget, he said.

While the official SAPS communication channels would not divulge how
their officers would be paid, it is understood that they will receive a
daily rate of R700.

Brigadier Phindile Radebe confirmed this, but could not say how much
overtime had already been worked or how it would be paid.

"It is an internal issue and will be determined by the number of hours
the officers are working and where they have been deployed from."

Speaking in Cape Town yesterday, national police commissioner General
Bheki Cele echoed this sentiment.

"The money issues, we are discussing them... For now, allow us to serve
and protect."

Extra SAPS officers have been brought in from North West and Western
Cape provinces, and from other parts of KwaZulu-Natal to work at the
Moses Mabhida stadium, after the facility's security guards were fired
over a wage dispute.

Police officers said they were mainly performing World Cup duties on
their days off, so as not to cripple the police presence in the suburbs.

Cele said police would continue taking on the security duties at the
four stadiums affected by the wage dispute. They were also ready to step
in at other stadiums if necessary.



Fleeing woman shot four times
Craig McKune (Cape Times) 18 June 2010

A Metro policeman, from no more than 8m away, fired at least four rubber
bullets into the back of a woman in quick succession as World Cup
security guards inquiring about outstanding pay were violently dispersed
in Cape Town yesterday.

It was not clear whether the unidentified woman was one of the
protesters or a bystander.

Earlier, walking quickly up Koeberg Road in Brooklyn on her own, the
woman had begun wailing as a line of police officers ran towards her,
firing rubber bullets at a crowd 200m away.

As they got closer, she began to run, putting her jacket over her head,
but when the police were no more than 8m away, one officer fired at
least four rounds into her back in quick succession. She fell over and
was picked up by police and pushed into the back of a van.

Earlier a group of about 150 of the Cape Town Stadium "stewards", or
security guards, had gathered outside the offices of Stallion Security,
where they demanded they be paid.

Stallion had been contracted to handle stadium security in Cape Town,
Joburg and Durban, but yesterday the company confirmed its contract had
been terminated after a dispute with the World Cup Local Organising
Committee.

The dispute arose after protests in the three cities saw police stepping
in quickly to take over stadium security.

Stewards have given varying explanations why they are unhappy, but
consistent accounts suggest:

# They are unclear how much they are to be paid a day.

# They had been told they would be given food and transport allowances -
which were paid in some cases - but they were later told these were
advance salary payments; one said he had spent R30 a day in taxi fare
from Delft for 17 days.

# They had not been paid and did not know when they would be.

# Most were told to sign a contract in a hurry and were not given a
chance to read it properly.

It is also not clear what occurred on Monday night before the
Italy-Paraguay game, but it led to the police stepping in and taking the
stewards by bus to the station. Hundreds of stewards are now without work.

Bongani Moyo, of the Building, Wood and Allied Workers Union of South
Africa, has suggested the action was "escalated unnecessarily".

Stallion apparently told the stewards to wait for an SMS on Tuesday or
to meet outside its offices at 10am yesterday.

Some received an SMS, others say they didn't. It read: "You will be paid
all monies due to u by 17h00 21 June. Pls SMS pay queries to 079 932 540
(sic) which will be paid with Monday pay."

The number given was one digit short. According to steward Sibongiseni
Madubula, many stewards did not have bank accounts; they did not have
pay slips and so could not query their wages; and they had not been
given reference numbers so they could be paid.

Dissatisfied, about 150 stewards gathered yesterday at the office in
Brooklyn, where Stallion asked them to fill in forms stating which days
they had worked in Cape Town at the stadium.

This article was originally published on page 4 of The Mercury on June 18, 2010



Valcke defends Fifa’s massive profits
PAUL KIRK The Citizen 18 June 2010

JOHANNESBURG - Defending their massive income from the 2010 World Cup,
Fifa general secretary Jerome Valcke, yesterday claimed that 80% of
African countries “would not have football” were it not for the efforts
of what is almost certainly the world’s wealthiest sports governing body.

Valcke made the claim as he revealed Fifa had massively increased their
profits during this World Cup – pocketing 50% more than they made during
the 2006 World Cup in Germany. He claimed that most of the cash
generated during this tournament would be invested into football
development.

Valcke made his claims minutes after Fifa spokesman Nicolas Maingot
announced that Fifa expected a provisional income of around $3,2billion
(R24 billion) from this World Cup.

Virtually all of this cash, generated mostly from ticket sales and the
sale of broadcast rights, will be taken back to Fifa headquarters.

In terms of their contracts, the South African Football Association’s
(Safa) top managers might, depending on their performance assessments,
get a bonus of up to 100% of their annual salary.

Safa itself may pocket as much as $200 million, around R1,5 billion.

Local Organising Committee (LOC) CEO Danny Jordaan has said this money
would be spent on football development, especially the development of
youth teams.

The estimated profits that the LOC might make are considerably lower
than those generated by the German World Cup’s LOC, which made $237
million from their World Cup. The lower profits for Safa are due to
significantly lower ticket prices compared to those charged in Germany.

In terms of agreements with Fifa, the soccer body will not have to pay
tax on this income and will not be subject to exchange control
regulations – while the SA taxpayer subsidised the giant stadiums built
for Fifa, the soccer body will not contribute anything toward the expenses.

All members of the Fifa delegation, as well as the Fifa hospitality
company Match will, according to these agreements, be treated as tax
exempt people while they would also be entitled to a 20% discount on all
accommodation.

Danish organisation “Play the Game” – an organisation that campaigns for
transparency, democracy and transparency in sport – has on numerous
occasions attempted to get details of exactly how much the top dogs at
Fifa earn, but have never been successful.

International corruption watchdog Transparency International (TI) have
pointed out that Fifa regu- lations which outlaw government interference
of any sort in national football associations cause huge problems for
the sport.

In 2002 TI released a report titled “Fifa Funding a Curse to African
Federations”. TI said attempts by a number of countries to oust
blatantly crooked football administrators had failed. There have been
few pro- tests against Fifa in SA.

Only one protest march, organised by the Anti Privatisation Forum (APF),
has been held, on the day the World Cup kicked off. In their press
release at the time the APF said: “The massive amounts of public funds
used to build new stadiums and related infrastructure for this World Cup
have only served to further deny poor people the development and
services they have been struggling for over many years.”



Security industry doing well
ÜGEN VOS 18 June 2010

JOHANNESBURG - Despite the fallout over Stallion Security guards being
pulled from guarding World Cup venues, the private security industry is
doing brisk business on the back of foreign jitters about South Africa’s
security situation.

The police and defence force have been going the extra mile to ensure a
memorable and incident-free tournament, but with potential threats
ranging from international terrorism to violent crime many are turning
to the private sector for an added sense of security.

‘‘South Africans very much have an attitude of ‘this can’t happen to me’
– but that only adds to our vulnerabilities,’’ warns DeltaOne Executive
Director Garth Fuchs.

The experienced Johannesburg-based company boasts interests across the
Middle East and provides protection details to three heads of state –
but warns not to underestimate potential threats to the tournament.

The company has geared up to protect visitors from anything from
politically-motivated terror attacks by al-Qaeda and its East African
proxies to violent service delivery protests, soccer hooligans and
common crime.

DeltaOne is protecting ‘‘quite a number of clients’’ during the World
Cup, and has employed around 80 additional contractors to deal with the
demand.

‘‘The industry overall is doing pretty well.”



Fifa ambushes itself. Again: Please, Diego, do something to upset this humourless lot
Carlos Amato 17 June 2010

Until this week, had you ever given a millisecond's
thought to the personality or merits of Bavaria beer? Nope? Me neither.

Police on hooligan alert ahead of English game

But on Tuesday, I resolved to invest in a six-pack of this fascinating
Dutch pilsener. Me and millions of other World Cup onlookers now reckon
that Bavaria is a rebellious, sexy, fun and edgy beverage. Wrongly, of
course, because a beer is a beer is a beer. It's innately fun, no matter
what the label says. Allow any carbohydrate to ferment for a while and
you have yourself an edgy beverage.

For Bavaria, the beautiful thing is that they did not engineer this
marketing miracle. Fifa did it for them, on behalf of Budweiser, the
World Cup sponsors they were attempting to protect.

Bavaria's rather pedestrian ambush-marketing stunt at Soccer City - they
dressed a gaggle of blonde South African babes in branded orange
miniskirts, and sent them to the game with cadged tickets - would have
had a puny impact, had Fifa not made such a spectacularly self-defeating
brouhaha about it.

Fifa has made complaints against the two evil masterminds of the outing,
Barbara Castelein and Mirte Nieuwpoort - a move the Dutch government has
drily termed "disproportionate".

You would have thought Nicolas Maingot and his advisers had learned
something from Fifa's pyrrhic legal victory over budget airline Kulula,
whose advertisements so wittily mocked them.

It seems Fifa's impressive efficiency relies on anal thinking. In
Rustenburg, myself and two fellow writers found ourselves in the wrong
place, and sneaked through a gap in a portable fence into the media area
of the stadium precinct.

A Fifa media official caught us in the act. She sternly declared that we
had no right to be in the area we were trying to leave. My colleague
said: "But we're trying to leave that area! It's OK!"

She strongly disagreed. "It is NOT okay!" she snapped in her rectangular
Teutonic tones. Real anger flashed in her eyes. We urged her to smile
and relax. She did neither. But short of carting us off to jail, there
was nothing she could do to reverse the ripple of disorder we had set
off in her world, so she grimly watched us go.

The scourge of Fifa's humourlessness is Diego Maradona. He is the
quintessence of "NOT okay" - and deserves kudos for slagging off smug
mandarins like Michel Platini and Pele ("Go back to the museum!" is an
instant classic).

Maradona is a one-man ambush-marketing campaign. Here's hoping he and
his team go far.

Needless to say, a dash of uptight, Fifa-style management would do South
African football plenty of good. Our game is all about bluster, hype and
easy sponsorship money, with no attention paid to the dull investment in
academies that grow great footballers. Even the fans are shallow and
short-sighted: witness the disloyal thousands who abandoned Loftus
Versfeld a full 12 minutes before the final whistle on Wednesday night.

Never mind. Bafana's likely exit is not a national disaster. After all,
the mighty Spanish might flunk out with us. And we can console ourselves
with three more weeks of captivating Fifa World Cup action. Anyone for a
Bavaria?



Mob fear triggers exodus: Zimbabweans not taking chances
VLADIMIR MZACA (Sunday Times) 20 June 2010

Zimbabweans living and working in South Africa have been returning home
in droves for fear of xenophobic attacks breaking out after the World Cup.

The assistant regional immigration manager at the Beitbridge border
post, Charles Gwede, said there had been an increase in the volume of
people going back to Zimbabwe.

"Last week on Saturday we had about 7632 people travelling back home
while only about 3000 crossed to South Africa," he said.

But it has been much higher than that.

"We had about 18000 travellers returning at some stage during the start
of the World Cup," he said.

Zimbabweans were among the victims of xenophobic attacks in 2008. They
were accused of taking jobs and women from South Africans. Many went
home but returned when South Africa scrapped its visa requirements.

But before the World Cup kicked off on June 10, there had already been
talk of a new spate of attacks on foreigners.

Leon Ndlovu has been working in South Africa since 1990 but he decided
to return to Zimbabwe.

"I went there in 1990 and worked as a gardener in Sandton and other
surrounding areas before I became a security guard.

"I survived the xenophobic attacks in 2008 because most people thought I
was South African.

"This time I am not prepared to face such a situation because it is
known that my wife is from Zimbabwe and I don't want us to be victimised.

"I am back home and I will only go to South Africa as a cross-border
trader," he said.

Cross-border traders, who transport food and other basics from South
Africa to Zimbabwe, say business has suddenly picked up because
Zimbabweans were sending many of their things home.

Mduduzi Ngwenya, of Mtshana Transporters based in Hillbrow, said:
"People were sending clothes and food regularly but, since the World
Cup, I have increased my trips to South Africa from two to three per week.

"I usually do so in December but now people are sending property such as
televisions, wardrobes, sofas and stoves."

Ngwenya said Bafana Bafana's disastrous loss to Uruguay might fuel anger
directed at foreigners.

"South Africans are passionate about their football but the loss against
Uruguay can set the ball rolling for foreigners to get beaten up," he said.

But Zimbabwe's minister of foreign affairs, Simbarashe Mumbengegwi, does
not believe there will be any new xenophobic attacks.

"I think the South African government has instruments in place to curb
such inhuman acts. I do not see xenophobia coming back," he said.

South Africa has also taken the possibility of xenophobia breaking out
seriously. The South African government spokesperson, Themba Maseko, has
been quoted as saying that the South African government will not
tolerate xenophobia.



Mbalula silences ‘prophets of doom’ on xenophobia
Mandy Wiener (Eyewitness News)

Deputy Police Minister Fikile Mbalula has dismissed suggestions there
could be xenophobic violence in the country after the FIFA World Cup.

Mbalula said on Friday South Africa is not a banana republic and
residents will not be allowed to get away with xenophobic attacks on
foreigners.

He said the ministry of police is unimpressed by the continued engraving
of fear in the hearts and minds of foreigners by faceless people.

The deputy minister said a united spirit has been demonstrated by all
Africans showing tremendous support for the six teams from the continent
during the World Cup.

Mbalula added verbosely that the prophets of dooms have been losing
sleep because of police successes and are designing ways to distract
officials from hosting a safe and successful tournament.

(Edited by Deshnee Subramany)



Nigerian gets three years for stolen tickets
Brigadier Sally de Beer 17 June 2010

Sally de Beer says Kunle Benjamin was unable to explain origin of tickets

On Wednesday night 16 June 2010, a Nigerian national was sentenced to three years imprisonment by a magistrate in a World Cup dedicated court for being unlawfully in possession of 30 (thirty) 2010 FIFA World Cup tickets.

The man, Kunle Benjamin, was arrested on Sunday evening in Sunnyside, Pretoria, after a police complaint's vehicle noticed him driving erratically through the streets.

As the suspect was acting suspiciously it was decided to search him and the 30 tickets were discovered.

The police investigating officer checked the tickets with a FIFA ticketing office and it was discovered that they were purchased by two men via the internet and that their addresses could not be verified.

The suspect was taken before a magistrate on Wednesday evening who found that he could not give a satisfactory explanation for being in possession of the tickets. He was convicted on a charge of possessing stolen property and sentenced to three years imprisonment without the option of a fine.

This is yet again an example of the effectiveness of having dedicated teams of detectives to deal with World Cup related offences and dedicated courts, magistrates and prosecutors to speedily process the cases.

Statement issued by Brigadier Sally de Beer, Natjoints, SAPS, June 17 2010



Dutch women traumatised - Lawyer
Sapa 17 June 2010

But FIFA defends arrests for organising wearing of orange dresses

JOHANNESBURG (Sapa) - The two Dutch women arrested in the orange dress ambush marketing saga were "very traumatised" by the experience, their lawyer said on Thursday.

"They were very traumatised; they were treated by bullies," Kobus Lowies told Sapa.

The two, Barbara Castelein and Mirte Nieuwpoort, appeared in the Johannesburg Magistrate's Court on Wednesday on charges related to the SA Merchandise Marks Act.

World football body Fifa accused them of having been sent by brewer Bavaria to orchestrate an ambush marketing campaign at the World Cup match between the Netherlands and Denmark on Monday. Fifa on Thursday referred any queries to the SA Police Service.

"The matter is now under criminal investigation, and the South African Police Service is proceeding as per the normal legislation," it said in a statement.

Fifa defended its decision to charge the two, pointing out that it did not charge any of the South African women wearing the orange dresses, apparently because they were not behind the orchestration of the campaign.

"In this case, it has surfaced that at least two co-ordinators were flown in from the Netherlands to organise this ambush activity -- they hired innocent local girls and devised a strategy," the Fifa media desk said.

This included training the group of local girls before the match.

Also, the two organisers' strategy included "disguising them as Danish fans (covering their orange dresses) and using a decoy group to divert the attention of Fifa and safety and security authorities to another area while the big group entered the stadium through another site, and then compelling them to lie to the police about the organisers' involvement in the activity".

"They also obtained tickets from unauthorised sources," said Fifa.

The two Dutch women were arrested after 36 women, all dressed in the same orange mini-skirts, were taken in for questioning by the police on Monday. The minis were handed out in Bavaria gift packs in Holland ahead of the World Cup.

The pair face charges of contravening the SA Merchandise Marks Act because Bavaria is not an official World Cup sponsor.

The Dutch newspaper, De Volkskrant, reported online on Wednesday that it was believed the two women arrested had their flight tickets and accommodation in South Africa paid for by Bavaria, while the South African women wearing the dresses only seemed to have been hired for the day.

"Fifa has filed charges against the organisers of the ambush marketing stunt pulled during the Netherlands vs Denmark match in Soccer City. No charges have been filed against the young South African women used in this illicit activity," Fifa said.

Fifa said it had warned companies before the 2010 Soccer World Cup that South Africa had legislation criminalising ambush marketing.

"Fifa wrote to a large number of companies before the tournament drawing their attention to this specific South African legislation, to avoid any unknowing infringements."

The world football body said it was "appalled" that these companies "use innocent people as a tool to conduct these unlawful activities".

"Fifa is looking into all civil remedies available and will await the outcome of the criminal case currently being run by the South African police service."

Bavaria hit back in its own media statement, saying it would not take any responsibility for Fifa's actions.

"Bavaria will ask Fifa to immediately stop intimidating Dutch-dressed female supporters."

It said Fifa had not contacted them about the accusations.

"If the Fifa has any problems with our company we'd like to ask them to contact us directly and don't take action against innocent people wearing our orange dress," said Bavaria.

The brewery described the arrests as unfortunate.

"Unfortunately, Bavaria has been drawn into the furore surrounding the arrest of the two ladies who were wearing an orange dress also worn by thousands of Dutch ladies and football supporters."

Its biggest concern at the moment was the "well-being of the two ladies" who were released on R10,000 bail each. They will appear in court again on Tuesday.

"Bavaria regrets that two Dutch ladies now have become a victim of the Fifa response to the orange Dutch dresses... There is no way Fifa can hold these ladies responsible for their attendance at the match in their Dutch dresses... Bavaria is currently doing everything in their power to assist the arrested Dutch ladies."

It had arranged "all legal assistance and housing" for the two women.

"Bavaria also keeps close contact with their families."

The brewery said its intention with the dresses had "always been to generate pleasure and enthusiasm amongst the football fans".

"This was very well understood and appreciated by the international audience in and around the Soccer City stadium in Johannesburg," Bavaria said.

"The Dutch dresses don't have a big brand name logo," it added




Security botch-up could have been prevented
Ayanda Mdluli, Nompumelelo Magwaza, Kamini Padayachee (Sapa) 17 June 2010

The company whose security guards went on strike at the Moses Mabhida
Stadium this week, pulled out of a multimillion-rand security tender at
the eleventh hour last year over a salary dispute with the local
organising committee (LOC).

Institute for Security Studies senior researcher Johan Burger told The
Mercury on Tuesday that the committee should have learnt from its
mistakes ahead of the Confederations Cup last year, and should take
responsibility for the latest debacle.

"The local organising committee would have been aware of the contractual
problems they encountered last year and should have avoided it this
year," he said. "It is strange that payment issues arise after the
contract was concluded, this should have been dealt with during the
negotiations about the contract."

The Mail & Guardian reported last June that a consortium comprising
the Sweden-based security conglomerate Securitas and local firm Stallion
Security was awarded the Confederations Cup security tender, but walked
away after the committee refused to pay "proper" salaries.

The committee had offered to pay R300 for a 12-hour shift, but this was
rejected by the Stallion management, which said it was substantially
lower than the going rate for guards at big sporting events.

The committee scrambled to appoint another company to provide basic
security services.

This week, it was Stallion's security guards themselves who protested
after a dispute with their bosses over wages.

Police took over their duties at Durban's and Cape Town's stadiums after
clashes, and on Tuesday this was extended to the Joburg and Port
Elizabeth stadiums.

While it could not be confirmed that the Stallion contract had been
cancelled because of the dispute, security industry sources said the
local organising committee had approached other companies on Tuesday to
take over.

Stallion Security CEO Clive Zulberg would only say he was consulting
lawyers.

Meanwhile, Fifa kicked for touch on Tuesday, saying that the committee
was responsible for safety and security "and as such our colleagues will
revert back to you in due course".

Committee spokesman Rich Mkhondo and his boss, Danny Jordaan, did not
return calls. Mkhondo had earlier said he would not answer further
questions over the strike.

The controversial head of committee security, Linda Mti, a former
correctional services director-general, also refused to answer questions.

The government sought to downplay the strike, saying it would not affect
security.

Government spokesman Themba Maseko said: "An additional 44 000 policemen
were actually made available just for the event to make sure we can deal
with any eventuality.

"Fans do not have any worries or anything to fear about the security
arrangements."

Police spokeswoman Nonkululeko Mbatha said 1 000 extra police officers
had been deployed at each stadium.

Burger said although police had planned for contingencies, it was not an
ideal situation.

"The police will be able to handle the stewarding services as they have
increased their capacity. They could also have trainees from the
training centres to perform these duties, but it does put them under
unnecessary pressure."

It also emerged on Tuesday that some of the striking stewards at Cape
Town's Green Point stadium were hired a week ahead of the kick-off,
hardly enough time for them to be properly vetted by the National
Intelligence Agency.

Earlier on Tuesday, Stallion Security's management met protesting
stewards in Durban and asked them to sign a form in which they accepted
the payment rates and agreed not to strike. This was refused.

On non-match days supervisors would be paid R13.88 an hour, while static
guards would receive R10.55 an hour. On match days, static guards would
be paid R11.38 an hour, while supervisors would receive R13.88.

A workers' spokesman, Skhumbuzo Magwaza, said they would join today's
march organised by the Durban Social Forum to protest against the
marginalisation of the poor during the world cup. - The Mercury



Parking woes
Arthur Reed June 16, 2010 Edition 1

Half of the parking for Addington Hospital has been closed off and
desperate people are driving around looking for parking to get into
hospital.

If this is what we have to put up with for the 2010 soccer, they can
keep it. Shame on you!

Arthur Reed
Pinetown



The sad truth behind making JABULANI balls
Sweatshop connection

Patrick Compton (The Mercury) 16 June 2010

NOT only is the volatile flight of the "Jabulani" World Cup football
under fire, but it has emerged that replicas of the ball, for sale in
South Africa, are being manufactured in Pakistan by stitchers earning
just £1.85 (about R21) a day.

A UK-based football charity organisation, Alive and Kicking, has noted
that Adidas's Jabulani ball was launched with great fanfare last month.
However, the charity says, behind the multimillion-dollar marketing
drive lies a story that undermines the credibility of Fifa's stated
objective to deliver a lasting footballing legacy in South Africa.

Replicas of the Jabulani are currently being hand-stitched by thousands
of factory workers in the city of Sialkot in the Punjab province of
Pakistan. Adidas states that the workers earn a minimum of 231 rupees
(R21) a day. Working a six-day week, this would add up to a monthly
minimum wage of 6 000 rupees (less than R560) - half the recognised
living wage in Pakistan.

Alive and Kicking is now asking why Fifa didn't insist on supplying the
tournament and its many peripheral outlets with footballs made in Africa
and in fair trade conditions.

"Africa has the skills to stitch footballs for the tournament and for
all its attached merchandising," says Alive & Kicking director, Will
Prochaska. "With high levels of unemployment across Africa, the
production of World Cup footballs on the continent would have given a
huge economic boost to some of the poorest nations on earth. A great
opportunity has been missed for the World Cup to kick-start industry and
deliver a lasting economic legacy to the world."

According to Alive & Kicking, the Jabulani ball has had no positive
impact on the people of South Africa, not least because it is
prohibitively expensive for the overwhelming majority in the country.

"Replicas of the World Cup football are currently retailing in South
Africa for R249 - more than the average South African weekly wage,"
continues Prochaska. "The use of cheap labour in Pakistan to produce
balls isn't translating into a product which can be afforded by the
average South African."

Alive and Kicking has set up stitching factories in Kenya and Zambia,
where footballs are made for free distribution to underprivileged
children across Africa. The factories have created hundreds of jobs in
areas of high unemployment and have given hundreds of thousands of
footballs - branded with HIV/Aids awareness messages - to children in
every country in Africa who otherwise would be playing with homemade balls.

"Currently, the majority of young footballers in South African villages
and townships have no choice but to play with rudimentary, homemade
footballs, typically fabricated with plastic bags and string," says
Prochaska. "Alive and Kicking is proud to be able to help reverse this
inequity."

Alive and Kicking says it will stitch more than 60 000 leather footballs
this year, and over half of them will be distributed free to
underprivileged children's projects across sub-Saharan Africa.

The charity says that British residents can donate quality leather
footballs to children in South Africa for just £12.50 (R140), nearly
half the price currently charged by Adidas.



World Cup investors lose R100k
Getrude Makhafola and Penwell Dlamini (Sowetan) 17 June 2010

CHANNON Merrick had to leave a meeting with his investors hastily after
they bayed for his blood in Soweto yesterday.

Merrick, the owner of Soweto Focus Point, a hospitality company meant to
cater for soccer tourists, had to face his 250 investors who had paid a
minimum R100000 for a slice of the anticipated 2010 World Cup bonanza.

The company joined forces with local businesses in each province to
provide cleaning, security, transport, tours, laundry and catering
services for 2010 . The investors are now angry because they did not get
the R2,9million profit that was promised to them.

An angry investor from Pretoria said: “He promised an upfront payment of
30percent in May. He postponed the payments to June 9, but we are still
waiting. We have spent thousands of rands buying cars and sourcing other
service providers.”

The investor said he had sourced four schools and promised principals
payments in return for using the schools for accommodation.

Another investor said all she wanted was her money . “We are almost into
the second round of the Word Cup, and I have not seen a single tourist.
This is not going to work, I want my money back or I would lose my
house,” she said.

The investors’ combined investment with Merrick totaled R25million. Most
of them borrowed money and some took out second bonds to finance the
initiative.

Merrick, however, said things did not go according to plan and that Fifa
“lied” to him as far as the expected number of tourists was concerned.

He also blamed the Department of Education for the accommodation crisis.
“District heads have now changed their tune and say they do not want
anything to do with the project.”

He said his company converted classrooms into accommodation facilities,
spending about R7000 to renovate each classroom at several schools . “Up
to this stage, we have only received 5percent bookings.”



Police ring of steel at stadium
BRONWYN GERRETSEN & AYANDA MDLULI June 17, 2010

DURBAN'S Moses Mabhida Stadium appeared to be the venue for a police
convention yesterday as thousands of officers swarmed the precinct.

They were positioned at every turn and lined up along most perimeter and
adjacent roads to provide security for the World Cup match between Spain
and Switzerland.

Police officials on the ground told The Mercury they believed about 4
000 officers had been deployed to the stadium yesterday, more than
double the number that did duty at Sunday's match between Germany and
Australia.

Some had been brought in from other parts of the country, such as the
North West and Western Cape provinces, and KwaZulu-Natal inland areas
such as Ulundi.

In addition, the SA National Defence Force was roped in to safeguard
Fifa accreditation centres at the King's Park swimming pool and at the
old drive-in site.

It was estimated that at least 500 officers were monitoring the crowds
along Masabalala Yengwa (NMR) Avenue and Isaiah Ntshangase (Walter
Gilbert) Road alone. About 100 were seated along the perimeter of the
field, monitoring the spectators, having replaced the security guards
who were fired this week after riots over wages after Sunday night's match.

Rows of police vehicles and motorbikes were seen in a parking area
across the road from the stadium's Isaiah Ntshangase Road entrance.

The thousands of soccer fans moved relatively quickly through the
stadium's entrances and security checkpoints, although a build-up of
fans arriving shortly before the 4pm kick-off caused some congestion at
the Masabalala Yengwa Avenue entrance.

Supporters, however, were not concerned at the up to 15-minute wait to
get through the checkpoints.

After the guards' Sunday night's riots and protests this week, which
resulted in thousands being fired, they have formed a 10-man committee
to liaise with their former employer and Fifa over the payment of
outstanding wages.

The workers say they were paid from R190 to R250 a day, substantially
lower than they claim they were promised.

Deputy Mayor Logie Naidoo said yesterday the guards had been misled into
believing they would receive R1 500 a day for working at the matches. He
said an offer of R500 was made, which he believed the guards should have
accepted. However, he said the eThekwini Municipality could not do
anything to reinstate the guards as the security company, Stallion
Security, had been appointed by Fifa.

"When the security guards chose to abandon their posts, the issue became
serious. We are not a banana republic and I'm angry at the people who
misled them," he said.

The guards would meet today to discuss the outcome of their discussion
with Fifa and Stallion.

However, any tension stemming from the riots and protests appeared to
have been forgotten yesterday, with fans flocking to the stadium in high
spirits, most kitted out in Spanish and Swiss supporters' paraphernalia.



Dresses row turns diplomatic Orange girl row involves diplomats
Dutch minister labels action as absurd Dutch embassy slams SA

Daily News Reporters 17 June 2010

THE orange dresses stunt at Monday's Netherlands-Denmark match is
developing into a full-blown diplomatic incident after two of the
wearers appeared in a Johannesburg court yesterday.

Dutch Foreign Minister, Maxime Verhagen, said "it is absurd that the two
women have a jail term hanging over their heads for wearing orange
dresses in a football stadium".

The minister telephoned South Africa's ambassador to The Hague, Peter
Goosen, to convey his government's displeasure.

Verhagen added: "If South Africa or Fifa wants to take a company to task
for an illegal marketing action, they should start judicial procedures
against the company and not against ordinary citizens walking around in
orange dresses."

He told Goosen the action against Dutch dress wearers, Mirte Nieuwpoort
and Barbara Castelein, who were among 36 blondes wearing the outfits at
the game at Soccer City, Johannesburg, was disproportionate.

The two women appeared in a court set up at the Johannesburg
Magistrate's Court for the World Cup.

They were arrested yesterday by police of the Commercial Crimes Unit at
their hotel in Roodepoort. They were granted bail of R10 000 each, and
told to return on Tuesday. They had to surrender their passports and
were ordered not to apply for temporary replacement travel documents or
engage in ambush marketing.

The pair's legal fees and bail were paid by the Netherland's Bavaria
Beer, creators of the dresses.

A Dutch embassy spokesman said the way the women involved in the "ambush
marketing" stunt had been treated was "a disgrace".

"It's a sledgehammer to crack a nut. We are not happy and trying to find
out how someone has broken South African law by wearing the colour
orange," he said.

In a statement, Fifa accused the organisers of the stunt of duping
locals to take part, initially disguising them as Danish fans by
covering up their orange dresses and then using decoys to divert the
attention of officials.

Fifa said it was "appalled" that a company would expose "innocent people
to possible criminal charges and knowingly create unnecessary concerns
for security staff and stewards, whose main focus should be safety
measures".

The Daily Mail in London reported today that the tickets used in the
orange mini-dress stunt were traced back to an allocation given to
British television commentator Robbie Earle, who was paid £150 000
(R1.68 million) a year by ITV as a pundit.

When ITV discovered the former professional footballer's tickets had
been used, it "terminated his contract with immediate effect".

The incident has raised questions of how Earle, a former Wimbledon
player who played for Jamaica at the 1998 World Cup, and was until
yesterday an ambassador for England's 2018 World Cup bid, was able to
get 40 tickets for the game. As an official World Cup broadcaster, the
BBC and ITV are allowed to buy hundreds of tickets for games.

But Earle would have had to sign a "terms and conditions" contract
reminding him that he could not pass the tickets on to a third party.

He would have bought the tranche of tickets and may have paid as much as
£105 (R1 190) each for them - though it is believed that the TV
companies can sell the tickets to their presenters at "preferential rates".

Yesterday, England fans arriving in South Africa for the game against
Algeria in Cape Town tomorrow questioned why Earle was able to get so
many match tickets.

One said: "We've spent a fortune coming over here for five days for the
England match on Friday. I don't begrudge someone like Robbie a few
perks, but to get so many tickets seems ridiculous.

"The World Cup is supposed to be about the fans, not an excuse for a big
corporate love-in."

It was reported that for the England group games, Earle may have had
access to as many as 150 tickets. Last night the BBC said presenters
would be given only a "handful" and would never be able to get "anywhere
near" 40.

An ITV spokesman said: "Robbie has been with us for eight years and has
been a very good pundit.

"But he not only signed the reminder, but was also told verbally that he
could not pass on or sell the tickets. They were supposed to be for the
use of friends and family.

"As soon as we were made aware of what had happened, Robbie's contract
was terminated."

Earle insisted he was not guilty of any wrongdoing: "Call me naive but I
didn't think I was doing anything wrong. I hope when people hear the
full story they will see me in a different light.

"I have absolutely no connection with any marketing ambush agency and
have not profited in any way." As he flew out from South Africa
yesterday, his misery was compounded by the news that he had been
dropped as an ambassador for England's 2018 World Cup campaign.

It has been revealed that Fifa has also started legal proceedings
against the Dutch brewer.

"Fifa has filed charges against the organiser of the ambush marketing
stunt pulled between the Netherlands-Denmark match at Soccer City two
days ago," a spokesman confirmed. - Additional Reporting Sapa-AFP



Stadium guard death 'a lie'
SAPS 17 June 2010

Durban - Claims by striking Word Cup security guards in Durban that one
of their colleagues died after being shot with rubber bullets were a
"blatant lie", KwaZulu-Natal police said on Thursday.

“It is a lie that a female guard died. We heard the rumour on Wednesday.
We checked and checked but we found no information about the death,”
Brigadier Phindile Radebe said.

Addressing hundreds of security guards at a protest march in Durban on
Wednesday, one of the leaders of the strike and one of the guards, Musa
Mnyandu claimed a security guard died at Addington Hospital from
injuries she sustained when she was shot.

Protest
Mnyandu did not release the woman's name. He was not immediately
available to comment on Thursday.

Guards hired by Stallion Security to work at the stadium overturned
refuse bins and threw objects at police in a protest over low wages on
Monday morning, after the game between Germany and Australia on Sunday
night.

Police fired rubber bullets to disperse them. Radebe said two guards
sustained slight injuries.

“We challenge people to give us the name of he person they claim has
died,” said Radebe.

Provincial health department spokesperson Chris Maxon Chris Maxon said
he had been told by Addington Hospital officials they knew nothing about
a guard dying.

Name unknown
Fifteen security guards interviewed outside Stallion Security offices on
Stamford Hill Road on Thursday said they had been told one of their
colleagues had died, but said they did not know her name.

Felakhe Bhengu, another of the strike's leaders, said he was one of the
people investigating the claim.

“We went to Addington Hospital yesterday (Wednesday) and they told us
that they would not help us because we were not related to the guard.”

Bhengu however claimed officials at Addington had confirmed the death.
He said the hospital would struggle to locate the guard’s relatives
because she had nothing identifying her.

“She had no name tag when she was taken to hospital. She lost it when
cops shot at us.”



Fan park stall holders feel short-changed
ANELISA KUBHEKA 17 June 2010

WHile eThekwini Muncipality has been applauded for successfully pulling
together a first-world stadium and sports event, the service provided to
stall holders at the beachfront fan park has been described as third world.

This is according to stall holders who said they were running at a loss
after investing about R30 000 into being able to set up at the park.

These stall holders, who did not want to be named, said the PR company
under which they were subcontracted was disorganised, inefficient and
unprofessional.

The food stalls at the fan park were towards the end of the beach and
there were no signs indicating where the food stalls were.

Initially these stalls had been on the promenade, but on Sunday the
owners were instructed by the company to move further back, without
explanation.

"The company's representative said this was not a request but a firm
instruction from the eThekwini Municipality, and this was strange, as we
have never even met one representative from the municipality," said a
stall owner.

When the Daily News contacted representatives of the company, Black
Pepper it was told to engage the municipality's Strategic Project Unit.
Black Pepper is the management consortium appointed by the city to
manage the event.

The stall holders said they had discussed the matter with
representatives from the company, but had been told that the move from
the promenade would be temporary.

"When we started trading we were put on the promenade and then on Sunday
we were moved away from it, causing business to just go downhill," said
another stall holder.

The stall holders said that according to the contract they had signed,
which had a planning map attached, the food area was to be situated on
the promenade.

Strategic Project Unit's Vivian Holden said Black Pepper had re-assessed
the trading areas of food vendors as trading on the promenade was a
temporary situation.

"After careful consideration and consultation with suppliers a decision
was made that they be re-positioned to better-suited facilities.

"The trading facilities (marquees) accommodate three vendors per
facility, and this was as per the initial set-up," Holden said.

Holden also said there was a site management office at the fan park, and
that "once all traders have moved into the food court area, a food
manager will be stationed in the food court itself to service the needs
of all the vendors in the area".



Pamphlets taken away from activist
Arthi Sanpath Daily News 16 June 2010

"This is not Fifaland."
This was the terse response by environmental activist Alice Thomson when
she was apprehended by authorities at the official Fifa Fan Fest at the
beachfront early this week.

Thomson was handing out pamphlets to visitors at the Fan Fest informing
them of a march today by the Durban Social Forum, made up of community
groups and activists.

The forum plans to hand over a memorandum to the provincial and local
authorities on the plight of the poor and the strict rules of Fifa that
were denying street traders their right to trade.

"While I was handing out pamphlets the police asked me to come with
them," said Thomson.

The pamphlet has the official Fifa image and replaces the original words
with "Phansi Thiefa" and "People before Profits". She said she tried to
argue that South Africa was a free and democratic country and not
"Fifaland".

"The Fan Park is a public space but they confiscated all my pamphlets,"
said Thomson, who was told that the Fan Park was governed by Fifa's rules.

"It seems that democracy has been suspended for the month while the
World Cup takes place."

While the officials did not open a case, Thomson said she would still
hand out pamphlets outside the Fan Park.

She said she was also concerned about the lack of a proper public
transport system.

"We only have the public system in place for the World Cup, but what
happens after that?"

Desmond D'Sa, co‑ordinator of the South Durban Community Environmental
Alliance, said the march would go ahead.

He said that while all the tourists were in the city, the forum would
not stand back.

Metro police spokeswoman, Joyce Khuzwayo, confirmed that metro police
would be deployed at the march.
arthi.sanpath@inl.co.za



Environmental concerns around Cup
Bongi Tshiqi East Coast Radio 17 June 2010

Several organisations are hoping government will start focusing on
ensuring poor South Africans also reap the rewards from the World Cup
and that the tournament doesn't harm our environment.

The groups include Earthlife, Streetnet and the South Durban Community
Environmental Alliance.

Members banded together for a march in the city centre yesterday to
highlight their grievances around how the tournament is being handled.

One of the organisers, Alice Thomson, says a memorandum was handed over
to the deputy mayor.

"There is an exclusion zone around the stadium so it's just the elite
that are benefiting from the World Cup, and in fact poor people who've
tried to benefit from the World Cup have been jailed or fined.

"We were promised a very good public transport system and that was
supposed to be one of the benefits of the World Cup, and we have been
environmental concerns about staging a big event like this."



FEEL IT, IT’S HERE

By Faith ka-Manzi (16 June 2010 - read at anti-FIFA protest)

The hijacking of our cities by FEEFA THIEVES who impose cruel bylaws on
the poors, depriving them of their daily living while the VOETSEPP
BLATTER and his cronies fatten their pockets.

FEEL IT, IT’S HERE

The breaking in, stealing and looting of the state coffers by the
elitists, monies meant for the development of the poors but used to suit
the demands of the FEEFA GANGSTERS.

FEEL IT, IT’S HERE

That even though factories lie idle and no sound of machines are heard
producing becaz only China should benefit in making Tshirts to be worn
faraway in Africa.

FEEL IT, IT’S HERE

That propaganda by these thieves and liars have been unearthed who have
said “We have everything ready for 2010”.

Meanwhile they are emptying our hospital of the sick denying them much
needed care for Fifa visitors.

FEEL IT, IT’S HERE

That much needed ambulances as South Africa has a right rate of violent
crimes – are stalling in cities hosting FEEFA and not serving the
interests of the taxpayers.

FEEL IT. IT’S HERE

The forced removals of streetkids, the homeless from the city into
transit camps becaz such dirt & grime of the hosting cities would reveal
how real is the poverty of South Africans to the world.

FEEL IT, IT’S HERE

That the Durban Metro continues to harass, arrest and steal goods from
street traders who are not brabded with the FEEFA BEAST’S mark.

FEEL IT, IT’S HERE

That the initial R1.8 billion budgeted for Moses Mabhida rose up to R3.1
billion sinking the city further into debt.

FEEL IT, IT’S HERE

That schools which were destroyed to make way for Bombela stadium in
Mpumalanga have not been built, plunging our country into more illiteracy.

FEEL IT, IT’S HERE

That the Gautrain which costs us R25 billion is only for the rich as the
15 minutes blast from OR Tambo to Sandton costs R100.

FEEL IT, IT’S HERE

Amasela engcebo yaseMzansi

Ingcebo ebekelwe ukuthuthukisa abanhlwempu

Behlangene nongxiwankulu bamankengane asemazweni aseNyakatho

FEEL IT, IT’S HERE

Namanje sisacoloniswa

Ngemvume yababusi abangamambuka

Abayishaya phansi

Bayishaye phezulu

YEAH

You can say it again

Feel it, it’s here

To your own detriment

Because you and your descendants

Will be indebted by the profits made by FEEFA

Time immemorial

YEAH

IT’S HERE
FEEL IT!




MEMORANDUM OF GRIEVANCES:

DATE: 16 June 2010

TO: KZN Premier Zweli Mkhize, Durban Mayor Obed Mlaba, Deputy Mayor
Logie Naidoo and Durban City Manager Michael Sutcliffe

RE: Grievances about World Cup 2010 management

We are the citizenry of Durban. Our organisations have long registered
grievances about the way the city is being run. In recent months, we
have found that many of our problems are worsening, especially because
of the way the World Cup has been implemented by FIFA, its corporate
partners, politicians and bureaucrats.

While in principle we do not oppose Durban hosting seven World Cup
games, we are very opposed to many decisions made by FIFA and city,
provincial and national officials. The problems we record below require
urgent attention and immediate remedial action.

Economic Burden
• Whereas Durban’s 70 000-seater Moses Mabhida Stadium cost taxpayers
R3.1 billion; the cost escalation for Mabhida rose from an initial R1.8
billion; and redirecting most of this spending could have erased the
majority of the vast backlogs Durban faces, of housing,
water/sanitation, electricity, clinics, schools and roads;

• Mabhida’s next-door neighbour is Absa Stadium, home of Sharks rugby,
which seats 52 000 and which could easily have been extended
(considering that Durban municipality will knock out 15 000 seats from
Mabhida after July);

• the companies and individuals that have profited most from Mabhida’s
construction include multinational corporations and those responsible
for notorious municipal disasters, such as bus privatiser Remant Alton
and Point development failure Dolphin Whispers, along with at least one
fake Black Economic Empowerment front company;

• the import bill for Mabhida appears unreasonable, as reflected in
breakdowns of Mabhida’s Sky Car due to imported German cables held up
for repair by the Icelandic volcano, and in imported German tents
erected next to Mabhida by an imported German marquee construction crew;

• the soaring foreign and domestic debt we are now suffering because of
World Cup expenses will cause untold problems for the SA economy in
years to come; FIFA is not subject to South African taxes; FIFA is also
allowed to ignore SA exchange control regulations; and the FIFA profit
estimate is more than R25 billion;

Corruption and State Failure
• whereas this kind of extreme waste and crony capitalism typifies
the relationship of FIFA to host governments; bribery and corruption
have been associated with FIFA’s operations (as documented in lawsuits
in Zug and New York); bribes have been predicted (by England’s former
World Cup bid manager) that would distort play by some of the leading
teams coming to South Africa; and corruption whistle-blowing in
Mpumalanga Province led to several suspicious deaths, reportedly by
organised hit squads;

• Durban’s own recent corruption in the construction of low-cost
housing by Zikhulise Cleaning, Maintenance and Transport became a
national scandal; Durban housing official Nigel Gumede and City Manager
Mike Sutcliffe rejected the findings of the National Home Builders’
Registration Council report which shows extensive wrongdoing – one third
of houses in Umlazi requiring reconstruction - in a R300 million
contract begun in December 2006; politically-connected Zikhulise owners
Shauwn and S’bu Mpisane have a notoriously luxurious lifestyle with a
car fleet worth a reported R100 million;

• Durban’s Council and ward committee system has become a form of
top-down political control; Council does not take our voices upwards;
the democratic gains that were won in 1994 are also our victories, but
have been taken from us;

• the September 2009 attack on the Abahlali baseMjondolo (AbM)
movement, its leaders and well known members, their family members and
its offices in the Kennedy Road settlement apparently received the
backing of the local ruling party and government structures; many AbM
members cannot go back to Kennedy Road; and several of the Kennedy Road
13 are being imprisoned interminably without bail or being charged;

• the Durban council has made clear its intent to demolish the Early
Morning Market at Warwick Junction in favour of a shopping mall; the
Early Morning Market is one of the surviving monuments of the indentured
Indian labourers; and hundreds of jobs – as well as affordable edibles –
for poor people are at stake;

• Durban fisherfolk have witnessed rich people fishing off expensive
boats and yachts unhindered while working-class subsistence fishermen
suffer police harassment and arrests; fishermen have recently been
denied access to New Pier, the South Pier, the Bluff military base and
the quayside shore (Gunter Gulley, Yacht Mole, Lucky Dip); and there is
worsening sea-water pollution – rubbish, oil and chemicals in the
harbour – and apparently no environmental precautions being taken;

• Durban’s hundreds of thousands of immigrants are under sustained
attack; the May 2008 xenophobic attacks demonstrated a failed municipal
state which by August washed its hands of ongoing xenophobia crisis and
by November used police brutality to displace desperate refugees;
Lesotho migrant workers are protesting the revocation of the ‘six month’
system of border concessions; there remain inadequate support systems
and preventative measures against another xenophobia attack; and
immigrants continue to face oppression in their dealings with the South
African government and police;

Workers, the Poor and Communities under Attack
• whereas this country is rich because of the theft of our land and
because of our work in the farms, mines, factories, kitchens and
laundries of the rich; and that wealth is therefore also our wealth;

• the working class and poor of Durban are under severe pressure
because of the world and SA economic crises, which have not yet lifted
for us, costing the country more than a million lost jobs and leaving
Durban badly exposed in sectors like shipping, clothing and textiles;
poor and working people are being pushed out of any meaningful access to
citizenship; recent government statistics prove the urban poor are
becoming poorer; and we are being forced off land and out of our cities;

• too many of us who have formal water and electricity connections
have not been able to afford the fast-rising costs of these services and
face disconnection; the promise of housing has been downgraded to forced
removal to a transit camp more like prisons than homes; housing that has
been built exists in human dumping grounds far outside of the cities and
far from work, schools, clinics and libraries; and there is a new,
heavy-handed, privatised municipal debt collection strategy that is
wrecking state-community relationships;

• poor flat dwellers have suffered from unaffordable and exploitative
rents; and the poor have been forced to sign exploitative rental
agreements under duress and threat of eviction;

• farm dwellers have suffered the impoundment of cattle, demolition
of homes, denial of the right to bury loved ones, denial of basic
service and brutality (and sometimes murder) at the hands of some
farmers; and a biased justice system which has systematically undermined
farm dwellers;

• outsourcing of casualised labour has become a full-fledged crisis,
as witnessed in the revolt by Stallion Security workers who were
exploited at Moses Mabhida and four other stadiums to the extent of
protesting in the face of police stun grenades, tear gas and rubber
bullets; crises caused by Durban’s labour brokers include the ports –
partly responsible for a recent three-week strike by transport workers –
and the University of KwaZulu-Natal, where underpaid workers (less than
R1000 take-home pay for UKZN cleaners) are suffering;

World Cup’s Pro-Rich Bias
• whereas while the rich have benefited from the World Cup, the poor
have not; the Zakumi doll mascot and other memorabilia were made in
China not South Africa; Durban’s informal street traders have been
displaced and barred from selling in the vicinity of stadiums; and
Durban fisherfolk have been evicted from the city’s main North Beach and
South Beach piers;

• township soccer facilities were meant to be created and maintained
with state subsidies but have not been; and street kids were brutally
displaced from central Durban in advance of the World Cup; according to
former chief executive of the South African Premier Soccer League
Trevor Phillips; “Durban has two football teams which attract crowds of
only a few thousand. It would have been more sensible to have built
smaller stadiums nearer the football-loving heartlands and used the
surplus funds to have constructed training facilities in the townships”;

• FIFA’s tourist initiatives are based on what it calls ‘luxurious
ambiance’ not working-class hospitality; promises of 450 000
international visitors for the World Cup were high overestimates; and
many jobs in the tourism sector were shed when the overestimates became
apparent;

Public Transport
• whereas many in Durban continue to be dependent upon private
automobiles (with resulting adverse impacts on climate change); there
has been a sharp decline in Durban’s public transport compared to other
South African cities which have begun investing in the Bus Rapid Transit
system; a government web-site (www.sa2010.gov.za) promised benefits for
the host cities of the 2010 FIFA World Cup Soccer including “a fast,
comfortable and low cost urban transport system … for central business
districts but also in townships”;

• Durban officials have implemented air-conditioned “People Mover”
buses with security guards at every stop, running every 15 minutes from
06h00 until 23h00, but only in the city centre and along the beachfront,
mostly for the benefit of tourists; there is still terribly inadequate
public transport in both the townships and suburbs, and many areas are
currently unserviced, and others have with an infrequent and unreliable
service with no bus timetables available;

Environment
• whereas the ‘greenwashing’ of the World Cup includes incorrect
claims by Durban officials that the CO2 permanently emitted in the vast
cement construction plus increased air travel can be ‘offset’ by
planting trees (which themselves are only a temporary, fragile container
of CO2 because they emit the same carbon when they die and biodegrade);
officials brag about ‘carbon credits’ from burning methane from rubbish
dumps in a World Bank Clean Development Mechanism project (even though
such ‘emissions trading’ is a dangerous distraction from fighting
climate change), and the poorest people of Durban will suffer the most
from climate change;

• there is no sense in constructing new coal-fired plants (such as
Medupi) and nuclear generators so as to give further electricity
subsidies to vast multinational corporations such as BHP Billiton (which
receives the world’s cheapest power); 100% renewable energy is a
pre-requisite to avert global climate disruptions; the refusal to phase
out coal, oil and gas also causes military conflicts, magnifying social
and environmental injustice; and governments; corporations such as BP
continue to support and finance fossil fuel exploration, extraction and
activities that worsen global warming such as forest degradation and
destruction on a massive scale, while dedicating only token sums to
renewable energy, and leaving areas like South Durban with some of the
world’s worst air pollution due to oil refining;

• global climate disruptions – extreme weather events, droughts,
floods, increased disease, scarce water - are already disproportionately
felt by small island states, coastal peoples, indigenous peoples, local
communities, fisherfolk, women, youth, poor people, elderly and
marginalised communities;

Our Rights of Expression
• whereas according to the bid proposal and subsequent contracts with
the South African government, FIFA was given full indemnity “against all
proceedings, claims and related costs (including professional adviser
fees) which may be incurred or suffered by or threatened by others;” and
in addition, “Police officers and other peace officials will be provided
to enforce the protection of the marketing rights, broadcast rights,
marks and other intellectual property rights of FIFA an its commercial
partners” – as witnessed in the ridiculous arrest of Dutch women whose
only crime was to wear an orange dress to Soccer City for the
Holland-Denmark game;

• our own leading journalists are stifled from reporting on FIFA’s
wrongdoing because of a required pledge not to throw the organisation
into ‘disrepute’ as a prerequisite for accreditation, as witnessed by
the refusal of the national broadcaster to show the documentary film
Fahrenheit 2010 made partly in Durban;

• the murder of three young men in Phoenix earlier this month is yet
more evidence of local police brutality, as was the excessive force –
stun grenades, tear gas and rubber bullets - used to subdue non-violent
Stallion Security workers protesting at Moses Mabhida Stadium on Monday,
June 14;

We therefore demand
• adequate compensation to Durban ratepayers and national taxpayers for
the windfall profits made by construction of unnecessary stadiums such
as Moses Mabhida, investigations into extreme cost escalations, and a
renewed commitment for a fiscal boost to remove South Africa’s vast
backlogs of housing, water/sanitation, electricity, clinics, schools and
roads;

• immediate imposition of taxation and exchange controls on
multinational and local corporations associated with the World Cup, on
grounds that contracts entered into with FIFA are legally Odious;

• investigations into bribery and corruption associated with FIFA
contracts and World Cup construction in Durban and especially in
Mpumalanga Province, and full criminal investigations into Durban’s own
recent corruption scandals;

• a thorough overhaul of Durban’s Council and ward committee system
so as to introduce genuine democracy and popular participation;

• a commission of inquiry into events associated with the jailing of
the Abahlali baseMjondolo Kennedy Road 13, their unconditional release,
and the right-of-return of AbM to Kennedy Road;

• the end of municipal harassment of traders, especially in the Early
Morning Market at Warwick Junction, and subsidies that would permit it
to become an historic monument, having just marked the market’s centenary;

• the end of municipal harassment of Durban fisherfolk, the
imposition of more reasonable fishing license fees, and a recommitment
to cleaning the harbour and beaches of pollution of all sorts;

• a renewed commitment to combating the scourge of xenophobia;

• a redistribution of the society’s income and wealth so that South
Africa is no longer the world’s most unequal major economy, an end to
the municipal debt collection strategy and other systems that worsen
inequality, and increases in free basic water and electricity allotments
financed through a luxury consumption tax on those who use too much;

• an end to exploitative rental and housing arrangements, to
oppression of rural people and to injustice against farm dwellers;

• a ban on labour broking, as has long been promised by the ruling
party;

• a dramatic increase in township soccer and sports facilities;

• follow-through on the promise of “a fast, comfortable and low cost
urban transport system … for central business districts but also in
townships” and an expansion of “People Mover” buses across metro eThekwini;

• an end to new coal-fired plants and nuclear generators so as to
save the environment from certain destruction, stringent monitoring of
air and water quality and public access to the findings, strict law
enforcement against polluters and littering, a commitment to proper
maintenance of all Durban’s green areas in a cohesive, sensitive,
responsible and inclusive manner for the benefit of the environment and
the people of Durban not just the city elite, dedication to the
eradication and control of alien species with a view to permanent job
creation, and strict enforcement of city bylaws by Metro Police to
prevent urban decay, slum development and the resultant health hazards
and environmental degradation;

• a retraction of indemnity to FIFA and end to the order prohibiting
journalists from throwing FIFA into ‘disrepute’ as a prerequisite for
accreditation;

• an end to police brutality, proper policing of all neighbourhoods,
and redirection of policing resources spent on FIFA to all citizens;

• an end to the arrogant, authoritarian, exclusive, insensitive,
parochial decision-making processes undertaken by the Ethekwini
Municipality throughout all areas of its jurisdiction.

When considering the speed and lavishness with which services were
delivered for the 2010 World Cup, we have no doubt the above demands can
be met timeously and professionally.

Handed over by:______________________ on __________________ at ____________

Signature:_________________________

Received by:________________________

Signature:___________________________

DURBAN SOCIAL FORUM CONTACTS:
Abahlali Base Mjondolo – Mnikelo Ndabankulu 0797450653
Abasha – Phindile Xulu
Centre for Civil Society – Trevor Ngwane 0790307657
Climate Justice Now! KZN – Alice Thomson 0845643891
Clairwood Ratepayers Association – Rishi Singh cell 0825533907
Clairwood Social Forum – Pravin Nansook or Sydney Govindsamy
Diakonia Council of Churches – Karen Read 0837831515
Early Morning Market Support Group – Roy Chetty 0823348461
ECOPEACE Party – Alan Murphy 0842037721
Earthlife Africa – eThekwini – Alice Thomson 031 465 9038
groundWork – Bobby Peak cell 0839826939
Islamic Propagation Centre International – Yusuf Ismail 0768164169
KZN Subsistence Fishers’ Forum – Essop Mohamed cell 0837864175
Palestine Support Committee – Lubna Nadvi 0837864918
Social Movements Indaba – Rassool Snyman 0835432480
Socialist Party of Azania – Asha Moodley
South Durban Community Environmental Alliance – Des D’Sa 0839826939
Ubuntu Babash Youth Organisation - Marvellous Ngwenya 0843762901
Umbilo Action Group – Vanessa Burger 0828477766
Umphilo waManzi – Mary Galvin 031 205 9034
World Class Cities for All campaign – Lou Haysom / Pat Horn cell 0767065282
Wentworth Development Forum – Patrick Mkhize cell 0835550023
Women in Action — Carmel Chetty 031-5631722
Youth in Action – Ndumiso Sandezi 0761145083
Isipingo Ratepayers — Shad Nowbuth cell 0826131886
Phoenix Fisher Forum – K Sewsunker 031-5391947


Thousands protest against World Cup spending
Marine Veith (Mail & Guardian) 16 June 2010

Thousands of South Africans staged a march on Wednesday to protest
against lavish spending on the tournament and the sacking of security
staff, inflicting a new embarrassment on organisers.

As the country marked the 34th anniversary of the Soweto uprising
against apartheid rule, about 3 000 people marched in Durban to denounce
Fifa and the government for their spending priorities when millions live
in poverty.

"Get out Fifa mafia!" chanted the crowds in a Durban park, their ranks
swelled by stewards who were involved in clashes with riot police on
Monday after protests over their wages.

Monday's protests triggered walkouts by other stewards, which have led
South Africa's police to take control at the World Cup stadiums in Cape
Town, Port Elizabeth, Johannesburg and Durban.

Ever since it was awarded the staging rights, South Africa's government
has faced accusations it should not be spending hundreds of millions of
dollars on stadiums when about 40% of the population lives on less than
$2 a day.

"If we have money for stadiums, we should not have any homeless people
or people having to live in shacks," organiser Allan Murphy said ahead
of the protest.

Much of the marchers' ire was directed towards Fifa, which has made
record amounts of money from the first World Cup to be held in Africa.

Football's governing body has insisted that the dispute over stewards'
wages is not its responsibility, having sub-contracted the work.

Widespread anger

But there is widespread anger among South Africans towards Fifa, whose
demands for a smooth-running tournament has seen the government pour
R33-billion ($4,3-billion) into World Cup preparations.

"The government has taken the ratepayers' money and handed it over to
Fifa," said Desmond D'sa, one of the protest organisers.

The walkouts by the stewards, a wildcat strike by bus drivers and ranks
of empty seats have combined to take the gloss off a largely triumphant
opening to the tournament last week.

As the last of the 32 teams was due to play their first match in the
tournament, including joint favourites Spain, local organising committee
chief executive Danny Jordaan said that "overall, it's been great".

But while organisers have rolled a series of new bus and rail services
for the tournament, Jordaan acknowledged problems with transport and
said restrictions on cars around the stadium may soon be extended.

South Africans have traditionally been wary of using public transport
over fears of crime and are reluctant to leave the relative safety of
their own vehicles.

"We have to try to restrict entry of cars into the precinct area around
the stadiums and that will definitely happen," Jordaan told South
African television.

Show of national unity

Bafana Bafana make their second appearance of the competition with an
evening match against Uruguay after their opening day draw against Mexico.

Many workers turned up for the office on Wednesday wearing their green
and yellow Bafana jerseys in a show of national unity seen as priceless
in a country that is still trying to bridge racial divides.

The Star said the staging of the World Cup underlined how far South
Africa had travelled since 1976, but added that the party atmosphere
should not obscure the problems facing the nation.

"Instead of its despised status as a pariah state, South Africa is
hosting 31 soccer teams from around the world, as well as the thousands
of fans that have come to cheer them on," it said in an editorial.

"But post-apartheid South Africa is not a sea of love. It still has
serious and potentially even explosive levels of inequality and poverty.

"We must be careful not to be misled by the bonhomie generated by the
World Cup and common loyalty to Bafana Bafana." -- AFP
http://www.mg.co.za/article/2010-06-16-thousands-protest-against-world-cup-spending



A group of protesters shout during a demonstration against the World Cup
in Durban, South Africa, Wednesday, June 16, 2010. More than one hundred
World Cup soccer security stewards have protested in Durban, before the
Spain against Switzerland soccer game, calling on FIFA to confirm what
they should be paid for working at the tournament.
http://www.star-telegram.com/2010/06/16/2268612/wcup-labor-protests-continue-in.html

Read more:
http://www.star-telegram.com/2010/06/16/2268612/wcup-labor-protests-continue-in.html#ixzz0r197CYd2



Voulez-vous vuvuzela with me? Just what is making that racket at the
World Cup in South Africa?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H8zsO5joO_M



NEHAWU DENIES SIGNING A NO WORLD CUP STRIKE AGREEMENT WITH THE STATE AS
AN EMPLOYER


NEHAWU has noted false media reports that the public sector unions
including NEHAWU have signed an agreement with the State as an Employer
that they would not strike during the Soccer World Cup tournament. The
amount of lies told by some in our media fraternity is not only
unprofessional and unethical but is also a recipe to distort the normal
functioning of the minds of our innocent readers absolutely for no
collective national gains.

NEHAWU rejects as pure lies the reports that allege that NEHAWU has
signed an agreement not to strike during the world cup period. We will
never sign such an agreement that denies workers their right to strike.
It is now time to expose media liars by asking them to produce the
alleged signed agreement – they will not be able to produce such an
agreement and that will confirm that they were lying all the time.

We have explicitly said that we will never allow the world cup to be
used to blackmail workers into abandoning their struggles for better
wages and working conditions. The media has clearly and deliberately
misrepresented the statement from the public sector unions to achieve
their sinister ulterior motives.

The fact is that the Constitution of the PSCBC to which we are
signatories states that only after the conciliation process has taken
place (within 21 days) and the dispute remains unresolved are unions
issued with a certificate that gives them the right to strike. The
unions are also expected to give the Employer seven (7) days notice
before embarking on a strike in terms of the Labour Relations Act.
Therefore, technically we are unable to strike during the World Cup due
to the dispute resolution time-frames as contained in the Constitution
of the PSCBC and the Labour Relations Act.

NEHAWU as a worker controlled union will never betray the workers by
signing any anti worker agreement with the employer and we will always
get our mandate from the workers. The union prides itself of being a
democratic, transformative, worker controlled organization and we are
always resolute in pursuing the interests of our members.

We are not anarchists, we play it by the rules and laws governing the
processes and the media ignorance due to lack of scientific research and
reason will remain what it is if they are not prepared to learn from
various educational environments. Our business is to advance the
interests of our members and not to educate those in the media who are
allergic to verifiable facts. Anyway, their (media) interests are not
our members’ interests.

Issued by NEHAWU Communications Department

For further information, please contact Sizwe Pamla (NEHAWU Media
Liaison Officer) at 082 5585962/ 011 833 2902 email: sizwep@nehawu.org.za

Visit NEHAWU website: www.nehawu.org.za



Confed Cup security fiasco
Adriaan Basson 5 June 2009

A frantic behind-the-scenes drama was playing out at Safa House last
Friday to secure the safety of international superstars and tourists
attending the World Cup curtain-raiser, the Confederations Cup.

On the same day football boss Danny Jordaan told American
decision-makers that a security plan was in place for the 2010 Fifa
World Cup.

The Confederations Cup kicks off next Sunday when Bafana Bafana play
Iraq at Ellis Park.

The Mail & Guardian can reveal that:
* Until Thursday last week no security company had been appointed to
safeguard VIPs, hotels, stadiums and training grounds;
* A consortium comprising the Sweden-based security conglomerate
Securitas and local security firm Stallion Security was awarded the
multimillion-rand tender, but walked away from negotiations after the
organising committee (OC) refused to pay “proper” salaries to security
guards and management; and
* A relatively small and unknown Cape Town-based security firm with a
limited national footprint, Chippa Protection Services, was appointed by
the OC last Friday and ordered to dispatch guards immediately to the
four stadiums to be used for Confederations Cup matches.

The New York Times reported this week that Jordaan, the OC’s chief
executive, addressed an American crowd in Manhattan last Friday, wooing
them to attend the World Cup and addressing fears about security.

“We believe we have a security plan in place and the World Cup will be
played without incident. We now have the British Lions rugby team on
tour. Next is the Confederations Cup. And if it goes without incident no
one will say a word. But if it doesn’t we will never hear the end of
it,” Jordaan was quoted saying.

But on the same day, Jordaan’s colleagues had to scramble to appoint
security guards to deliver basic security services to players and teams
attending the Confederations Cup.

The roots of the mess
The M&G has traced the roots of the mess to February 25, when the tender
for the provision of “static and VIP protectors” was advertised by the
OC. The tender document states that the tournament requires 1 182
security guards to protect the hotels where players, administrators and
referees are staying, the four stadiums used for the Confederations Cup
(Ellis Park, Loftus, Bloemfontein and Rustenburg), and the training
grounds for the eight participating teams.

The guards should have been trained “to the standards as determined by
the OC and Fifa” and were to be deployed from June 4. A small number of
security guards had to be placed at the ticket centres in four cities.

But, until the M&G sent the OC questions Wednesday, no award was made.
Several industry insiders told the M&G this week about the OC’s mad rush
to appoint guards after receiving the newspaper’s questions.

On Thursday last week, representatives from the Securitas/Stallion
consortium were summoned urgently to Safa House. There they were told
for the first time that the consortium was the preferred bidder and had
to dispatch guards to the four stadiums the same night.

The M&G was told that afternoon by OC spokesperson Rich Mkhondo that an
award had been made. What he omitted to say was that the award had only
been made a few hours before.

According to inside sources, Securitas/Stallion agreed to the award and
hastily made plans to provide the required guards.

But on Friday afternoon negotiations broke down after the parties
couldn’t agree on payment terms for guards and management. The M&G has
it on impeccable authority that the OC offered to pay R300 a security
guard for a 12-hour shift.

This, according to industry insiders, is “substantially lower” than the
going rate for guards at big sporting events. According to security
experts it is quite common for these guards to be paid between R300 and
R400 for three-hour shifts at big events.

The Securitas/Stallion consortium subsequently withdrew from the
contract. This was confirmed by Stallion chief executive Clive Zulberg,
who told the M&G “our offer was a lot more than what they budgeted for”.
He declined to divulge more information due to a non-disclosure agreement.

Securitas spokesperson Gisela Lindstrand confirmed the firm’s “ongoing
discussions regarding delivering security services for the Fifa
Confederations Cup in South Africa, but it is our policy never to
disclose any information about negotiations or discussions with
potential customers”.

The withdrawal of Securitas/Stallion left the OC without security guards
17 days before the kick-off.

In the meanwhile the OC made an “ad hoc award” to Cape Town-based Helios
Security, which also guards Safa House, to protect the stadiums and
equipment stored there. Helios director Reza de Bruyns confirmed that
they were asked to protect the stadiums until Tuesday this week, when
they were informed that Chippa would take over.

A small Muldersdrift-based security outfit, Interactive Security, also
received an ad hoc appointment to guard the four ticketing offices.

After the M&G made further queries, Mkhondo confirmed that the
negotiations with Securitas/Stallion had failed and that the OC reserved
the right to start negotiations with the “reserve bidder. This is what
happened in this case.”

We give the guys one day’s training'
The reserve bidder was Chippa Protection Services. Managing director
Siviwe “Chippa” Mpengesi told the M&G the company was under “tremendous
pressure” to deliver the security services on such short notice. “We
received our letter of appointment on Friday [May 29] and started on
Monday.”

On whether it was difficult for Chippa to deliver such crucial services
in a short period, Mpengesi answered: “Of course. Because of the nature
of the contract, we needed to recruit a lot of guards and clothe them …
Of course it was a challenge, but it won’t be the first challenge we face.”

But he added that his company did not have the capacity to provide VIP
protection services and had outsourced that part of the contract.

According to a company profile Chippa was registered in 2002, has 1 600
registered security guards on its books and is providing security
services to a range of education facilities in the Western Cape, as well
as to Eskom, Transnet, Metrorail and the police.

Mpengesi confirmed that he had had to hire new guards to fulfil the
Confederations Cup tender. “We had people on our database. We also made
use of agents. What we did was to give the guys a one-day training on
how to conduct security at special events. We are very strong on training.”

Mpengesi said all his guards were registered with the Private Security
Regulatory Authority (Psira) and the OC was going to vet them from
Thursday. “If they have criminal records, we are not going to use them.”

He admitted to “lowering our profit margin” to be able to provide
security guards for the tournament.

He dismissed criticism from industry insiders that his company was
inexperienced: “The so-called big companies must accept that we’re in a
new era, that things have changed dramatically. They always do that --
when we were awarded a waste-management tender, they lodged an appeal
with Cape Town to say we are a small company. We are not small. Our
turnover is not less than R7-million a month.”

This is shocking
Institute for Security Studies expert Johan Burger told the M&G on
Thursday he was “shocked” that a few days before the start of the
tournament security wasn’t in place.

“I know that the organising committee and the police have been planning
for these events for the past four to five years. The Confederations Cup
is supposed to be a curtain-raiser for the big event. This is shocking
to say the least.”

The National Intelligence Agency had to vet all security guards for
events such as the Confederations Cup. “To do proper vetting takes at
least a few weeks.

“All this means to me is more pressure on the South African Police
Service, who already have their hands full. It looks as if somebody was
not doing their work here and I’m afraid to say all fingers are pointing
at the OC.”

The same New York Times article quoted recent research by the
international Grail Research company that found security was still the
overriding concern for people considering attending the 2010 World Cup.

Grail’s Kurian Thomas was quoted as saying: “There is general agreement
that South Africa is not known to be a very secure country and that
there is a higher risk to personal safety than in the rest of the
Western world. There are concerns, and it could be a detriment to people
going to the World Cup.”

The OC’s security portfolio is headed by former prisons boss Linda Mti,
who left the correctional services department under a cloud. The M&G
revealed last year that Mti had been convicted for drunk driving in 1992
and was facing a similar charge to be heard by the Port Elizabeth
Magistrate’s Court this year.



Strike guard dies - claims
sport24 16 June 2010

Durban - Striking security guards in Durban on Wednesday said one of
their colleagues died in hospital after she was allegedly shot with
rubber bullets during a protest over low wages on Monday.

“I would like to inform you that one of the people shot on Monday has
died. She died at Addington Hospital,” Musa Mnyandu claimed.

He was addressing hundreds of security guards, street vendors and shack
dwellers who took part in a service delivery march in Durban on Wednesday.

Mnyandu did not release the name of the guard. Police spokesperson
Brigadier Phindile Radebe was also unable to confirm the death.

“We are trying to get information on this matter, but we are not
winning. We will continue trying to get information.”

She said four guards sustained slight injuries when they were shot with
rubber bullets on Monday morning.

“My understanding was that no one was admitted to hospital.”

Hundreds of the protesting guards had been replaced by the police, who
would get help from volunteers.

Guards hired by Stallion Security to work at the stadium overturned
refuse bins and threw objects at police on Monday morning after the game
between Germany and Australia on Sunday night.

They claimed they had been promised R1 500 a day, but were getting only
R190. Police fired rubber bullets to disperse them.

Wednesday's march began at Botha Park and ended at the City Hall where a
memorandum was handed to Cyril Xaba, a member of the KwaZulu-Natal
legislature.

Marchers complained about the lack of service delivery and high
electricity prices. They demanded a "World Cup for all", saying the
country should put people before profits. They said the R40 billion
spent on the World Cup could have housed over three million South Africans.
http://www.sport24.co.za/Soccer/WorldCup/NationalNews/Strike-guard-dies-claims-20100616



Guards try to torch office
360news 16 June 2010

Durban – Two World Cup stadium security guards protesting over low wages
tried to torch their employer's office in Durban on Wednesday morning.

Security guards were gathering outside Stallion Security's premises in
Stamford Hill Road when two of them lit newspapers and approached the
building.

Their colleagues stopped them while others ran away. The papers, taken
from a man distributing free copies of a community newspaper, were
doused before the two men reached the building. There were no police
around at the time.

Security guards were camping outside the offices waiting to be paid.
Some got their wages on Tuesday. It was not clear if the rest would get
their money on a public holiday.

Guards hired by Stallion Security to work at the stadium on Monday
morning overturned refuse bins and threw objects at police after the
game between Germany and Australia on Sunday night.

They claimed they had been promised R1 500 a day, but were getting only
R190. Police fired rubber bullets to disperse them.

The guards were expected to move to Botha Park later on Wednesday where
they would meet street vendors who apparently wanted to support their
strike.



WCup labor protests continue in Durban
Mike Corder Associated Press 16 June 2010

Several hundred World Cup workers and supporters gathered in Durban on
Wednesday to protest labor conditions in a dispute that has spread to
half the tournament's stadiums.

The security stewards, who say they have been banned from working, sang
and chanted slogans ahead of a planned march to the coastal city's town
hall. Police kept watch but did not intervene.

Late Sunday, police used force to break up a demonstration outside
Durban's World Cup stadium, firing rubber bullets, tear gas and flash
grenades at protesting workers.

Police have since taken over security at five of the World Cup's 10
stadiums.

"Our protest is not aimed at disrupting the World Cup. It's just to
remind the government they must get their priorities right," Trevor
Ngwane, a protest organizer, told The Associated Press.

"When we ask for jobs, better education and houses, they tell us there
is no money. But suddenly there are billion rand (available) to build
stadiums."

Stewards at Durban's stadium say they were turned away from the venue
after they complained about being underpaid by a private contractor.

Police have taken over security at that site as well as other venues
using the same company, in Cape Town, Port Elizabeth and Johannesburg.

Wednesday's protest in Durban was joined by local fishermen and other
workers who say their daily lives have been disrupted by the World Cup.

The rally was peaceful with organizers even urging protesters not to
blow on their vuvuzelas _ the ubiquitous plastic horn seen at this World
Cup.

Fisherman Rajen Inderjeeth said he had been stopped from fishing in a
part of the city's seafront where luxury hotels look onto the sea and a
fanzone.

"When we go they chase us away. They are taking away our livelihoods,"
said Inderjeeth, who held up a handwritten sign that read "We will fish
against your rules."

Community worker Pravin Nansook said most Durban residents had been
excluded from the World Cup festivities.

"They paint a beautiful picture in the center of town for the tourists.
But the tourists should see what the rest of (Durban) is like and the
problems that are there," Nansook said.

"People can't afford to go to the stadiums ... The World Cup is just for
the elite."
http://www.taiwannews.com.tw/etn/news_content.php?id=1289890&lang=eng_news&cate_img=145.jpg&cate_rss=news_Sports



FIFA, World Cup organizers clam up on stadium security
Associated Press 16 June 2010

JOHANNESBURG — FIFA and South Africa’s World Cup organizers went on the
defensive Wednesday about security issues at five World Cup stadiums
caused by a stewards’ strike over low pay.

The spokesmen for FIFA and the organizing committee declined to address
the problems at their daily news briefing, referring all questions to
police.

"We have nothing further to say about the security issue, please call
the police," South Africa organizers spokesman Rich Mkhondo said. "They
are able to answer all security-related matters. All. Not me."

Police have taken responsibility for both Johannesburg stadiums, and the
venues in Cape Town, Durban and Port Elizabeth, since stewards began
protests Sunday night. Police used tear gas and fired rubber bullets to
disperse stewards who were angry about their wages and refused to leave
Durban’s Moses Mabhida Stadium.

In Durban on Wednesday, stewards joined community activists in a
peaceful protest of about 800 people outside City Hall to protest the
World Cup, which they say has directed public funds away from providing
housing and jobs.

Protesters held placards that said "Apartheid Still Exists" and "World
Cup for All! People Before Profit."

The dispute spread to Johannesburg on Tuesday. South African police
deployed 1,000 officers to screen more than 54,000 fans arriving for
Brazil’s 2-1 victory over North Korea at Ellis Park after employees from
security contractor Stallion walked out hours before the evening kickoff.

"We are confident that we will not compromise the safety of the
tournament or our day-to-day normal policing," National Commissioner
Gen. Bheki Cele said.

Mkhondo did not say which agency or security firm would provide security
at the 84,000-capacity Soccer City stadium in Johannesburg when
Argentina plays South Korea in a 1.30 p.m (11:30 GMT) kickoff Thursday.

"I would love to talk about this issue, but the police will be able to
talk about this issue," he said.

Police spokeswoman Major Gen. Leko Mbatha told The Associated Press that
officers would be on duty at Soccer City as part of a "temporary
arrangement" with the organizing committee.

She said officers at Ellis Park did "an excellent job. We’re very much
confident they will continue to do so."

Mkhondo also declined to address how the organizing committee, which is
responsible for all national and venue security at the World Cup, would
pay for using additional police.

Asked whether organizers were preparing to fire Stallion, which was
contracted to provide security at the five stadiums now under police
control, Mkhondo said he had "no comment about this issue."

FIFA spokesman Nicolas Maingot said he was not aware if the organization
would be required to help fund the policing bill.

In March, FIFA gave an additional $100 million ($81 million) to help
South African organizers upgrade team training camps.



FIFA, World Cup organizers clam up on stadium security
Associated Press 16 June 2010

FIFA was criticized Wednesday by activists who said football’s governing
body had too much influence in South Africa.

"Today’s march is to give a voice to people who have been left out of
the World Cup and to protect people who are being exploited by companies
involved in the World Cup," said Lubna Nadvi, from the Durban Social Forum.

Cyril Xaba, a special adviser to the provincial prime minister in
KwaZulu-Natal, said the government could not intervene in the labor
dispute, which could be settled by a state-funded arbitration committee.

"People have benefited from the World Cup," Xaba said. "Roads are built,
stadiums were built and that brought jobs. There was also more work in
the hospitality industry and more taxes raised by the government — so
everyone benefits from this, even when it’s not visible straight away.

"Of course, we are not naive and we realize that not everyone can
benefit directly," he said. "I sympathize with them."

Part of Durban’s beachfront was cleared for fan zones, and street
traders and fishermen have been excluded from the areas.

The protesters sang, prayed, danced and chanted slogans as they marched
to the coastal city’s town hall. Police, many of them carrying shotguns,
kept watch but did not intervene.

As the protesters gathered in the shade of trees in a dusty downtown
park, impoverished residents collected water in empty bottles from a
broken tap.

About three kilometers (two miles) away, fans gathered near a giant
temporary stage on the beach and listened to rap music at a fan zone
before a Group H match between Spain and Switzerland.


Workers' protests affecting the experience of fans at the World Cup
Strikes by security and transportation workers have affected several
matches in the first week of the 2010 World Cup in South Africa.
Anton Capria 15 June 2010

Fans have begun to feel the effects of workers protests in the first
week of the 2010 World Cup. Photo (c) flickr user Axel Bührmann. Used
under a Creative Commons 2.0 licence

Strikes by security and transportation workers have affected several
matches in the first week of the 2010 World Cup in South Africa.

According to the Telegraph, hundreds of security workers at Durban
stadium were dispersed by police, who had to turn to using rubber
bullets and tear gas once the mob became unruly and refused to vacate
the stadium. The newspaper reported that security workers grew angry
after picking up their pay envelopes following the match between Germany
and Australia. Anger stemmed from the fact that the pay envelopes
contained only a fraction of the amount of money that workers had been
promised.

The following day saw two more strikes according to Times LIVE. In the
report it described how 90 Bus Rapid Transit System drivers decided to
hang up their keys. A decision that left fans of both Denmark and the
Netherlands in a difficult situation, as thousands of them tried to make
their way to Soccer City for the match between the two countries.
Officials directed fans on and off various trains to reach the stadium.
An American tourist speaking to Times Live said, “the situation is
chaotic but fine”.

Monday evening security officials meant to work the Italy vs. Paraguay
match walked off before the stadium opened, according the Local
Organizing Committee. Sport 24 reported that, “Police have taken over
responsibility for the security at Green Point stadium for the match
between Italy and Paraguay due to start at 20:30 tonight”. Times LIVE
reported, “By 7.30pm in Cape Town, a half hour before kickoff, the
stadium was only half full because police officers were taking time to
admit fans. Supporters waited in the rain and wind as hundreds of
policemen scanned them with metal detectors”.

According to Sport 24, Local Organizing Committee CEO Danny Jordaan
deflected the fault and said, “This is an employer-employee wage
dispute. Although we have respect for workers' rights, we find it
unacceptable for them to disrupt match-day proceedings and will not
hesitate to take action”.

According to the Budapest Repot, “Authorities have demanded a major
investigation, citing corruption as employment policies were allegedly
wrong".



South Africa: Riot police attack World Cup stewards pay protests
Robert Stevens 16 June 2010

South African riot police responded to protests by thousands of stewards
at the soccer World Cup, with tear gas attacks and rubber bullets.

The first police operation began on Sunday evening when around 500
stewards entered the Moses Mabhida stadium in Durban, three hours after
the game between Germany and Australia. The stewards were demanding the
payment of the 1,500 rand (US$197) a day they were promised. They were
only paid about one eighth of that—190 rand (US$25).

At around 3 a.m., following initial negotiations over pay, about 80 of
the stewards refused to leave the stadium. Riot police then set off two
percussive grenades in an attempt to force the workers to leave the
parking lot under the stadium. Once the workers had been forcibly
removed, they were again attacked with teargas and rubber bullets in the
areas immediately outside the stadium. Several people were injured, with
one woman badly hurt after being shot. The operation continued later as
up to 100 police surrounded a group of 300 protesters near the stadium,
separating the men from the women.

The following day, the protests spread to Cape Town as some 80 stewards
attempted to strike at the Green Point stadium prior to the evening
Italy-Paraguay game. The workers were confronted by at least 100 riot
police who forcibly removed them. One steward was severely hurt,
according to reports. World Cup organisers drafted in 1,500 national
police trainees to take over security for the game, which resulted in
many supporters having to wait in long queues before being allowed into
the stadium.

One of the stewards, speaking anonymously, told the Associated Press,
“They were supposed to give us 1,500 rand, that’s what FIFA
[International Federation of Association Football] told us, and they
gave us 190. We are working from 12 o’clock until now.”

Even after police had fired teargas and used rubber bullets against the
workers, Rich Mkhondo, spokesman for the South Africa organising
committee, claimed that the dispute was one to be resolved between the
stewards and their employers, Stallion Security Consortium. “We don’t
get involved on what an employer pays their employees”, said Mkhondo.
Games at the Moses Mabhida Stadium in Durban, Cape Town Stadium and
Soccer City and Ellis Park stadiums in Johannesburg will all now be
stewarded by the police.

The protests continued Tuesday when hundreds of stewards began a strike
outside Ellis Park ahead of the evening game between Brazil and North
Korea. According to an AP report, more than 2,000 stewards began the
strike at 12:30 p.m. A worker said that since they began work on May 27,
their pay had been falling. For a 10-hour working day the company was
offering staff just 190 rand (US$25). He said that he would not accept
this and would work for 500 rand (US$65).

In Durban, around 2,000 stewards protested to demand that payments be
increased. Some 150 workers marched from the Moses Mabhida Stadium,
where Spain and Switzerland are due to play Wednesday, to a rally near
the town’s railroad.

Some of the Durban protesters held placards reading, “We need our money,
then we can feel it”. This was a play on the slogan created for the
South Africa 2010 event, “Feel It, It Is Here”.

More workers joined the demonstration before they marched back to the
stadium area, with a helicopter hovering overhead. They were met by
dozens of police and moved into a fenced-off field. According to a Mail
and Guardian report, “The guards [stewards] ignored forms they were
asked to sign to give an undertaking that they would not withdraw their
labour again during the World Cup.”

Another report said that the police had water cannon on standby and that
some of those who turned up were told they had incorrect papers and
turned away. AP reported that most of the demonstrators left after a
couple of hours, after being paid just 205 rand (US$26.50) in exchange
for handing in their World Cup accreditations and uniforms.

Workers are concerned that they have been effectively sacked, as the
police are now in charge of stewarding. Many of the stewards had signed
contracts to work for three months. Reuters quoted a female security
guard who participated in the Durban protest. She said, “They just told
us that our jobs have been taken by the police. We signed a contract for
three months. I want to get a straight answer about whether our jobs are
still here.”

One of the protest leaders, Sibusiso Mthethwa, said, “We want people of
FIFA to confirm our earnings because Stallion has robbed us”.

The South African Transport and Allied Workers Union stated in the
mildest of terms that it would “gather more information, so we can
attempt to engage FIFA and the local organising committee and find a
solution”. Union coordinator Mzwandile Jackson Simon said, “I don’t
think police will manage on their own.”

The police operation will be stepped up this week, with extra forces
being sent to Durban on Wednesday when Spain and Switzerland play in the
city.

In another dispute, bus drivers in Johannesburg took wildcat action
Monday. The drivers said they had not been given enough notice that they
would be expected to work longer hours during the tournament. As a
result, several hundred football fans were left stranded after the
Netherlands-Denmark game in the “Soccer City” area of Johannesburg. The
drivers returned to work the following day after an agreement was
reached between their employers, Clidet, and the South African Municipal
Workers Union.

The violent crackdown on the stewards reveals the brutal reality behind
the carefully crafted corporate mantra of the World Cup organisers: that
the hosting of the tournament has “united” all South Africans. Rather,
those who are lucky enough to get a temporary job stewarding for a few
weeks are being paid a pittance, and protests are met with immediate,
state-sanctioned police violence.

Danny Jordaan, the chief executive of the World Cup organising
committee, warned that any further action would be subject to
crackdowns. “Although we have respect for workers’ rights, we find it
unacceptable for them to disrupt match-day proceedings and will not
hesitate to take action in such instances,” he said.



Two Dutch women arrested over ambush marketing
AFP,Sapa 16 June 2010

Two Dutch women were arrested on Wednesday over alleged ambush
marketing, for organising 36 women to wear short orange dresses made by
a Dutch brewery to a World Cup match, police said.

The dresses were sold with Bavaria Beer packs in The Netherlands in the
run-up to the World Cup, and Fifa says the group wore them to Monday's
Netherlands-Denmark match as a marketing stunt in defiance of its strict
commercial regulations at matches.

The women were detained during the match at Johannesburg's Soccer City
and taken to a Fifa office where they say they were questioned for
several hours.

The two arrested on Wednesday were part of that group, and now face
three possible charges, including a violation of the Merchandise Marks
Act, police said.

The case against the two women was postponed in the Johannesburg
Magistrate's Court on Wednesday.

They would return to the court on June 22 to enter a plea, and to be tried.

"These women, who have been part of a larger group, are suspected to be
involved in organised acts to conduct unlawful commercial activities
during the Denmark-Netherlands match," the police statement said.

"We view ambush marketing in a very serious light and we urge people not
to embark on these ambush campaigns," it added.

'Outrageous'
Meanwhile, the Dutch Foreign Minister, Maxime Verhagen, said on
Wednesday the arrests were "outrageous".

Verhagen "finds the arrest and [criminal] charge to be a disproportional
reaction", he said in a statement released by the Dutch Foreign Ministry.

"It is outrageous that the two women have a jail term hanging over their
heads for wearing orange dresses in a football stadium," Verhagen added.

"If South Africa or Fifa wants to take a company to task for an illegal
marketing action, they should start judicial procedures against the
company and not against ordinary citizens walking around in orange
dresses." -- AFP, Sapa



World Cup strike spreads to half of venues
16 June 2010

Security stewards angered over low pay expanded their strike Tuesday to
five of the World Cup's 10 stadiums, forcing police to assume their
duties in a bitter counterpoint to the generally festive tournament.

South African Police Services said it deployed about 1,000 extra
officers in and around Johannesburg's Ellis Park to guarantee security
for the night match between Brazil, one of tournament favorites, and
North Korea.

On a day that carried winter's bite in this Southern Hemisphere nation,
hundreds of stewards and security guards dressed in their black uniforms
sang, whistled and chanted for more pay outside the stadium.

"Everywhere we go, we have rights," they sang as armed police kept watch
but did not interfere. Later, bundled in knit caps and gloves, many of
the strikers huddled in the raw wind and temperatures just above
freezing, waiting for news about negotiations.

Police said they also have taken over security at stadiums in Durban,
Cape Town and Port Elizabeth, where Portugal and Ivory Coast played to a
0-0 draw Tuesday.

Several hundred guards also walked off the job at Soccer City, the main
World Cup stadium on Johannesburg's outskirts. There was no match there;
its next game will be Thursday.

At issue is a wage dispute between the mostly black stewards and
Stallion Security Consortium, a private, black-run company hired by
World Cup organizers to provide stewards for five of the 10 venues. No
wage problems have surfaced among stewards hired for the other five
stadiums by South Africa's largest security company, Fidelity.

A woman who answered the phone at Stallion's Johannesburg office said
company officials had gone to Ellis Park for a meeting about the
dispute. No details of any negotiations were made public.

The dispute comes against a backdrop of jitters about security for the
monthlong tournament and numerous examples of screening for journalists
and VIPs that has been more lax than at other major sporting events.

The strikers said they were being offered from 126 rand ($16.50) to 190
rand ($25), for 12- to 15-hour shifts. They were demanding at least 450
rand per day ($59).

Strikers accused the security company of mistreating them, feeding them
only one meal during their shifts. They said many were unable to get
home after getting off work late in the evening and were spending the
night at bus and police stations in the frigid cold.

"We are freezing," said Denis Manganye. "They said this World Cup we
would be getting money. Where is the money?"

In Durban, some 2,000 stewards protested over wages, calling on FIFA to
confirm what they should earn for working at the tournament.

Most of the demonstrators left after a couple of hours when they were
paid 205 rand ($26.50) in exchange for turning in their orange stewards'
bibs.

"I am not happy about it, but I'm all right," a man who gave only his
first name, James, said as he left the protest.

The demonstration started with about 150 stewards dancing, chanting and
singing as they walked from near the Moses Mabhida Stadium to a rally
near Durban's busy downtown railroad. As their numbers swelled, they
walked in an orderly column back to the stadium, where dozens of police
shepherded them into a fenced-off field.

The stewards and a union official both called on FIFA to mediate in the
dispute with Stallion.

"We are trying to gather more information, so we can attempt to engage
FIFA and the local organizing committee and find a solution," South
African Transport and Allied Workers Union coordinator Mzwandile Jackson
Simon said.

"There are indications they are willing to work something out," he
added. "I don't think police will manage on their own."

Simon said the union is convinced that Stallion has made wage
commitments to the stewards that were not fulfilled, and that the
company needs to be an active part of efforts to resolve the dispute.

According to South Africa's Business Day and other local financial
media, Stallion is a privately held black economic empowerment company.
Simon said one of its principals is a former national prosecutor,
Bulelani Ngcuka.

On Monday, police took over security at stadiums in Durban and Cape Town
after the stewards protested. Both cities are scheduled to host
semifinals next month. Police were posted around the Durban stadium
Tuesday and carried out checks that previously were done by the stewards.

Durban police used tear gas and rubber bullets after Sunday's match
between Germany and Australia to disperse a crowd of stewards at the
stadium. However, there have been no reports of serious security
problems inside the stadiums arising from the stewards' absence.

"We are confident that we will not compromise the safety of the
tournament or our day to day normal policing", said the national police
commissioner, Gen. Bheki Cele.

South Africa's World Cup organizing committee declined to comment on the
extension of the strike to Johannesburg. Spokesman Rich Mkhondo said
questions should be directed to the police and the security contractor.

Earlier Tuesday, Mkhondo said at a daily news briefing that organizers
"will not tolerate any defiance or putting the tournament into risk."

FIFA also declined comment on the protest.

Elsewhere on the labor front, trade unions which represents employees of
South Africa's electricity monopoly are threatening a strike over wages.
Mediation talks are planned later this week with Eskom, which is
offering a 7 percent wage hike while workers are demanding a 15 percent
increase.



Security guards march to Durban stadium
15 June 2010

Scores of security guards marched to the Moses Mabhida Stadium in Durban
after talks with their employer at Durban station on Tuesday.

Their pay queries would be addressed at the stadium, said Tebogo
Lehlokoe, of Stallion Security.

Monitored by the police, the uniformed guards sang and chanted slogans
on the kilometre march. - World Cup strike spreads to half of venues
2010-06-16 01:30:00

Security stewards angered over low pay expanded their strike Tuesday to
five of the World Cup's 10 stadiums, forcing police to assume their
duties in a bitter counterpoint to the generally festive tournament.

South African Police Services said it deployed about 1,000 extra
officers in and around Johannesburg's Ellis Park to guarantee security
for the night match between Brazil, one of tournament favorites, and
North Korea.

On a day that carried winter's bite in this Southern Hemisphere nation,
hundreds of stewards and security guards dressed in their black uniforms
sang, whistled and chanted for more pay outside the stadium.

"Everywhere we go, we have rights," they sang as armed police kept watch
but did not interfere. Later, bundled in knit caps and gloves, many of
the strikers huddled in the raw wind and temperatures just above
freezing, waiting for news about negotiations.

Police said they also have taken over security at stadiums in Durban,
Cape Town and Port Elizabeth, where Portugal and Ivory Coast played to a
0-0 draw Tuesday.

Several hundred guards also walked off the job at Soccer City, the main
World Cup stadium on Johannesburg's outskirts. There was no match there;
its next game will be Thursday.

At issue is a wage dispute between the mostly black stewards and
Stallion Security Consortium, a private, black-run company hired by
World Cup organizers to provide stewards for five of the 10 venues. No
wage problems have surfaced among stewards hired for the other five
stadiums by South Africa's largest security company, Fidelity.

A woman who answered the phone at Stallion's Johannesburg office said
company officials had gone to Ellis Park for a meeting about the
dispute. No details of any negotiations were made public.

The dispute comes against a backdrop of jitters about security for the
monthlong tournament and numerous examples of screening for journalists
and VIPs that has been more lax than at other major sporting events.

The strikers said they were being offered from 126 rand ($16.50) to 190
rand ($25), for 12- to 15-hour shifts. They were demanding at least 450
rand per day ($59).

Strikers accused the security company of mistreating them, feeding them
only one meal during their shifts. They said many were unable to get
home after getting off work late in the evening and were spending the
night at bus and police stations in the frigid cold.

"We are freezing," said Denis Manganye. "They said this World Cup we
would be getting money. Where is the money?"

In Durban, some 2,000 stewards protested over wages, calling on FIFA to
confirm what they should earn for working at the tournament.

Most of the demonstrators left after a couple of hours when they were
paid 205 rand ($26.50) in exchange for turning in their orange stewards'
bibs.

"I am not happy about it, but I'm all right," a man who gave only his
first name, James, said as he left the protest.

The demonstration started with about 150 stewards dancing, chanting and
singing as they walked from near the Moses Mabhida Stadium to a rally
near Durban's busy downtown railroad. As their numbers swelled, they
walked in an orderly column back to the stadium, where dozens of police
shepherded them into a fenced-off field.

The stewards and a union official both called on FIFA to mediate in the
dispute with Stallion.

"We are trying to gather more information, so we can attempt to engage
FIFA and the local organizing committee and find a solution," South
African Transport and Allied Workers Union coordinator Mzwandile Jackson
Simon said.

"There are indications they are willing to work something out," he
added. "I don't think police will manage on their own."

Simon said the union is convinced that Stallion has made wage
commitments to the stewards that were not fulfilled, and that the
company needs to be an active part of efforts to resolve the dispute.

According to South Africa's Business Day and other local financial
media, Stallion is a privately held black economic empowerment company.
Simon said one of its principals is a former national prosecutor,
Bulelani Ngcuka.

On Monday, police took over security at stadiums in Durban and Cape Town
after the stewards protested. Both cities are scheduled to host
semifinals next month. Police were posted around the Durban stadium
Tuesday and carried out checks that previously were done by the stewards.

Durban police used tear gas and rubber bullets after Sunday's match
between Germany and Australia to disperse a crowd of stewards at the
stadium. However, there have been no reports of serious security
problems inside the stadiums arising from the stewards' absence.

"We are confident that we will not compromise the safety of the
tournament or our day to day normal policing", said the national police
commissioner, Gen. Bheki Cele.

South Africa's World Cup organizing committee declined to comment on the
extension of the strike to Johannesburg. Spokesman Rich Mkhondo said
questions should be directed to the police and the security contractor.

Earlier Tuesday, Mkhondo said at a daily news briefing that organizers
"will not tolerate any defiance or putting the tournament into risk."

FIFA also declined comment on the protest.

Elsewhere on the labor front, trade unions which represents employees of
South Africa's electricity monopoly are threatening a strike over wages.
Mediation talks are planned later this week with Eskom, which is
offering a 7 percent wage hike while workers are demanding a 15 percent
increase.

Associated Press writers Mike Corder in Durban, and Jean H. Lee and
Graham Dunbar in Johannesburg contributed to this report.



Security guards march to Durban stadium
Sapa 15 June 2010

Scores of security guards marched to the Moses Mabhida Stadium in Durban
after talks with their employer at Durban station on Tuesday.

Their pay queries would be addressed at the stadium, said Tebogo
Lehlokoe, of Stallion Security.

Monitored by the police, the uniformed guards sang and chanted slogans
on the kilometre march. - Sapa



Security walks off in CT
news24 14 June 2010

Johannesburg - Security officials meant to monitor happenings at the
World Cup match between Italy and Paraguay on Monday evening have walked off, the Local Organising Committee said.

Spokesperson Rich Mkhondo said the committee had asked the SA Police
Force to take over security services at Green Point Stadium in Cape Town
and Moses Mabhida Stadium in Durban until further notice.

"The request came after stewards left their posts following a wage
dispute with their employer, Stallion Security Consortium Pty (Ltd),"
Mkhondo said in a statement.

"The police have taken over responsibility for the security at Green
Point stadium for the match between Italy and Paraguay due to start at
20:30 tonight."

He said gates were open and police were in control.

"The match will kick off as scheduled."

OC chief executive Danny Jordaan said this was unacceptable and action
could be taken.

"This is an employer, employee wage dispute. Although we have respect
for workers' rights, we find it unacceptable for them to disrupt match
day proceedings and will not hesitate to take action in such instances."

The OC said it would continue to monitor the situation.



Rea Vaya staff strike
14 June 2010

Johannesburg - A strike by some Rea Vaya bus drivers at Soccer City on
Monday afternoon has left nearly a thousand fans looking for alternative
transport, the company said.

"Some Rea Vaya Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) bus drivers embarked on an
illegal work stoppage during the course of this activity (transporting
fans from the Denmark versus Netherlands match)," said Clidet CEO Jackie
Huntley in a statement.

Clidet is the company which manages Rea Vaya.

Huntley said the company was putting in place contingency plans to take
back fans who arrived from the Constitution Hill Park and Ride and from
Soweto.

"However, the less than 1 000 fans who used Westgate and Central
Business District stations will be requested to use Metrorail free to go
back to Westgate rail station," said Huntley.

"They will then be transported free of charge to their various Rea Vaya
stations within the CBD and to Ellis Park with Metrobus."

Clidet was considering taking "decisive action" against the drivers and
was formulating plans for Tuesday's match.



LOC referee stadium dispute
14 June 2010

Johannesburg – World Cup organisers are meeting with stadium stewards
and a security contractor to resolve a pay dispute that saw police use
tear gas and fire rubber bullets at striking workers after the
Germany-Australia match in Durban.

Sport24's Soccer World Cup Match Centre

South Africa organising committee spokesperson Rich Mkhondo says the
talks are intended to ensure that disputes do not spread to other host
cities and stadiums.

Mkhondo said World Cup organisers had a contract with the security
company, Stallion, but that "we don't get involved on what an employer
pays their employees".

The dispute flared at Moses Mabhida Stadium in Durban early on Monday,
three hours after Germany's 4-0 win.

Disgruntled stewards had tried to stay in the stadium to protest wage
levels.



Injuries during Durban protest
COSATU 14 June 2010

Durban - Several people were injured when protesting security guards
threw bottles at the office of a security manager at the Moses Mabhida
Stadium at 01:30 on Monday, police said.

"Security guards hurled bottles and other objects at the office of the
security manager, which struck some of the staff, causing slight
injuries," said Brigadier Phindile Radebe.

She said 500 guards went on the rampage, overturning refuse bins and
throwing hurled objects at police after the game between Germany and
Australia.

A case of public violence had been opened and detectives would view
closed circuit television footage to identify the culprits.

Security guard Fanak Falakhebuengu told The Associated Press that he had
heard guards would be paid R1 500 a day, but that they had only received
R190.

"They were supposed to give us R1 500 - that's what FIFA told us - and
they gave us R190."

Radebe said spectators had already left the stadium when the protest
started.

"The police managed to move them away from the stadium, but they
regrouped and continued with the protest."

Police fired rubber bullets at them. "Minimum force in accordance with
the situation was then used to disperse the group from the stadium," she
said.

Tender given to security company

The security guards were hired by Stallion Security, which received a
tender from the Local Organising Committee.

Comment could not be obtained from Stallion Security.

Radebe said the police and the security company had contingency plans in
place to ensure that the next game at the Moses Mabhida Stadium would
not be compromised.

Local organising committee (LOC) spokesperson Rich Mkhondo was not
immediately available to comment.

Ethekwini Municipality manager Mike Sutcliffe referred all media
enquiries to the LOC and FIFA.

"The Moses Mabhida Stadium is owned by the City of Durban. The stadium,
however, was handed over to the Organising Committee (OC) and FIFA on 24
May 2010," he said.

He said the two organisations were responsible for all elements of the
operation and management of the stadium and the appointment of all
stadium service providers and employees.

"The organising committee appointed Stallion to provide stewarding
services at the Moses Mabhida Stadium and were responsible for the terms
and conditions of their appointment," he said.



PRESS CONFERENCE ON THE PLANNED NATIONAL DAY OF ACTION AGAINST MEXICO
Press Alert: 14 June 2010

The Congress of South African Trade Unions (COSATU) affiliated unions,
namely National Union of Mineworkers (NUM), National Union of
Metalworkers of South Africa (Numsa), South African Transport and Allied
Workers Union (SATAWU), Chemical, Energy, Paper, Printing, Wood and
Allied Workers Union (CEPPAWU), International Metalworkers Federation
(IMF) and International Chemical, Energy and Mining Federation (ICEMF)
will be holding a PRESS CONFERENCE to brief members of the media and the
general public on the NATIONAL DAY OF ACTION against the fascist Mexican
government in the midst of the ongoing 2010 FIFA World Cup currently
underway in our country.

As the progressive trade union movement and the voice of conscience we
had declared all along that we will never suspend our political
programme because of the 2010 FIFA World Cup in the interests of
appeasing the World Cup visitors. Our struggles are much bigger than the
World Cup.

The Press Conference will be addressed by the following leaders;

* NUM General Secretary – FRANS BALENI
* NUMSA Deputy General Secretary – KARL CLOETE
* CEPPAWU General Secretary – SIMON MOFOKENG
* SATAWU General Secretary – ZENZO MAHLANGU
* IMF Africa Regional Representative – STEPHEN NHLAPO
* ICEM Africa Regional Representative – FABIAN NKOMO

The details of the PRESS CONFERENCE are as follows:

DATE: Tuesday 15 June 2010
TIME: 11H00
VENUE: NUM Head Office, 1st Floor, 7 Rissik Street, Marshalltown

Members of the media are hereby invited to attend and report.

Issued by NUM, NUMSA, SATAWU, CEPPAWU, ICEM, IMF

Contact:

Lesiba Seshoka
NUM National Spokesperson – 082 803 6719

Castro Ngobese
NUMSA National Spokesperson – 073 299 1595

Cedric Maluleka
CEPPAWU National Spokesperson – 082 738 2855

Zico Tamela
SATAWU International Affairs Secretary – 083 437 8654

Patrick Craven
COSATU National Spokesperson – 082 821 7456



Strike looms at Eskom
NUM

The National Union of Mineworkers (NUM) is highly perturbed by the
continuous arrogance from Eskom bosses who have after many hours of
talks offered workers nothing for a housing allowance. The majority of
Eskom workers live in the periphery, in shacks whilst their bosses
continue to rake in millions in bonuses for apparently bringing in “3,6
billion rands of profit”. The so called profit is in actual fact money
looted from the poor public through a 24,8% tariff hike as well as the
continuous refusal by Eskom to award its workforce a housing allowance.
On wages, Eskom stands at 6% whilst the unions need an 18% wage hike.
The NUM feels there will be no any other delay but to give Eskom what it
requires , that is, a strike action if the union secures a certificate
of non-resolution tomorrow.

Eskom managed to secure an interdict earlier in the month on the basis
that the NUM has not followed due process. Now that the union is
following due process, a showdown looms!

Lesiba Seshoka (NUM National Spokesman)- 082 803 6719

011 377 2047

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