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Publication Details

Reference
Xenophobia News & Analysis Archive Volume 1 (2010) Xenophobia News & Analysis Archive Volume 1. various : -.

Summary
Run! run! run! They are coming to kill you!'
ebogang Seale 20 July 2010

It was described as a "freak incident of pure criminality", misread as
xenophobia, but the attacks were enough to send a Malawian packing for
good.

Sunday night's attacks at the Kya Sand informal settlement near
Honeydew, which saw several spaza shops and shacks looted, also struck
fear in a Zimbabwean woman, who hastily left for Zimbabwe to renew her
passport.

Balancing their luggage on their heads, Steven Lazarus and the woman,
who preferred to be called by her first name, Mickey, didn't look back
as they trudged out of the settlement on Monday.

Behind them, police officers were busy questioning residents for clues
that could lead to the arrest of the instigators, but Lazarus and Mickey
were not pacified. "I am leaving because they have started doing the
same nonsense they did two years ago," said Lazarus, who has been
staying in the area for two years.

"I am not sure what's going to happen tonight so I have to go. I am
scared," he said.

He looked fearful, but Mickey was a diplomatic about the reasons for
leaving.

"Life is precious. Who is not afraid to die? I have to go because I need
to sort out my passport," she said.

Inside the densely populated settlement, police officers were moving
into the narrow alleys, questioning residents and some of the victims.

One of the victims, Charles Mokoena, said he had been asleep at about
9.30pm when he was awakened by screams from his brother, telling him to
flee.

"He kept calling my name, saying 'Run! run! run! They are coming to kill
you!" said Mokoena, who is a South African.

When he returned to his shack, he found that his electrical appliances
had been taken.

"This is not xenophobia. If you chase people away, why must you rob
them?" he asked.

Some residents claimed that they knew the instigators, whose motives
were "jealousy" and their actions "robbery".

There was a heavy police presence in the area on Monday as fears mounted
that the violence could flare up again.

According to some officers at the scene, different methods were now
being used to prevent and quell any outbreak of xenophobia-related
violence.

This involved a direct interaction with residents in affected areas,
identifying instigators rather than "mere shooting with rubber bullets
and stun grenades". This, they said, was part of the lessons learnt from
the police's strategies to prevent and combat riots during the World Cup.

Police spokesperson Brigadier Govindsamy Mariemuthoo was quick to
dismiss reports that the attacks were xenophobic. "There were tensions,
clashes and a stand-off, but it's not correct to say it was xenophobic.
There were also South Africans who were attacked. Whatever happened were
criminal acts, and we are investigating," he said.

Meanwhile, the Zimbabwean government has set up temporary shelters for
hundreds of its citizens fleeing South Africa.

The head of the government's civil protection, Madzudzo Pawadyira, said
three marquees had been erected, equipped with amenities like blankets
and dishes.

The Beitbridge border has particularly been flooded with hundreds of
Zimbabweans leaving South Africa because of rumours of xenophobic
attacks after the World Cup.

Pawadyira said the same measures had been put in place in Plumtree to
cater for Zimbabweans returning through that border gate with Botswana.
"Indeed, there has been an increase of volume at Beitbridge, but this is
not confined to Zimbabweans. It includes other nationals from Zambia and
Malawi."

This article was originally published on page 3 of The Star on July 20,
2010



Police confirm 'tensions' in Kya Sands
Sapa 20 July 2010

Gauteng police could not confirm reports on Tuesday morning that foreign
nationals had been attacked at Kya Sands, north of Johannesburg, saying
only there were "tensions" in the township.



Soldiers patrol streets Diepsloot township, north of Johannesburg.
Photograph by: SIMPHIWE NKWALI

"From yesterday [Monday], there was some stand-off with regards to
tensions there," said Brigadier Govindsamy Mariemuthoo.

"We have a heavy police presence there," he added.

Several radio stations reported on Tuesday that four foreign nationals,
of Zimbabwe and Mozambique, and one South African had been attacked in
overnight clashes.

A Talk Radio 702 journalist reported seeing two men escorted from the
informal settlement with deep cuts to their heads while a woman said she
was kicked in the chest.

Another man was bleeding from a wound to the head.

"I was just sitting at my home and a group of people just came and they
asked me where I come from and before I could answer they started
hitting me," the man told the radio station.

But Mariemuthoo said on Tuesday morning that he was still gathering
details of what had exactly happened and ended the phone call when asked
if foreign nationals were injured.

He could only confirm "allegations of looting".

"There were people claiming they were looted and they were asked to open
cases."

Mariemuthoo said he would have more information later in the day.

The Zimbabwean government said on Monday it had been forced to set up
temporary shelters for Zimbabweans leaving South Africa following
threats of attacks on foreign nationals.

A wave of xenophobic mob attacks hit South Africa two years ago.

More than 60 people were killed and thousands displaced.



Migrants attacked in Johannesburg, five hurt
Reuters, AFP 20 July 2010

South African residents have attacked migrants from African countries in
a Johannesburg township, injuring at least five people and increasing
concerns of a wave of xenophobia after the Soccer World Cup.

Local media said four of those injured at Kya Sands were from Zimbabwe
and Mozambique. The fifth was a South African who said his attackers
refused to believe he was a local.

Tensions have long been building between South Africans and millions of
foreign migrants they accuse of taking jobs and homes, but open
animosity appeared to be put on hold during the World Cup as South
Africa showed its best face to the world.

A spate of attacks on foreign workers in 2008 killed 62 people and
damaged investor confidence. Another wave could wreck the positive image
that Africa's biggest economy was able to portray during the soccer
tournament.

Running battles erupted late on Monday at Kya Sands after a robbery
inside the township sparked anger between locals and foreigners, Eye
Witness News website reported. It took police several hours to quell the
unrest.

The webiste said two men had deep cuts to their heads. One said he had
been attacked with an axe. A woman was carried out on her husband's
back, saying she had failed to outrun a mob and had been kicked in the
chest.

Foreign migrants are estimated to make up more than 10% of South
Africa's population of about 49-million. Many are Zimbabweans who fled
economic collapse at home.

Tents at the border
Meanwhile, a Zimbabwe official said on Monday that tents had been
erected at Beitbridge -- the main border crossing to South Africa -- to
house people fleeing the country.

"We have put three big tents in Beitbridge, 10 000 blankets, 20 boxes of
laundry soap and 1 000 buckets," said Madzudzo Pawadyira, head of the
government's civil protection unit.

"Indeed, there has been an increase of volume at Beitbridge, but this is
not only confined to Zimbabweans, but this also includes other nationals
from Zambia and Malawi," Pawadyira said.

"Most of the people who were in South Africa are sending their children
back home. Then you have those who are coming back because their
usefulness in South Africa is no longer required. - Reuters, AFP



Heavy police presence amid xenophobic clashes
Gill Gifford 20 July 2010

Xenophobic clashes broke out in Kya Sands late on Monday night and
during the early hours of Tuesday morning as police have moved in and
are maintaining a heavy, watchful presence.

"We don't have all the details yet, and I can only confirm that there
definitely were some attacks.

"We're still sketchy on exactly how many and we're busy investigating
the motives," said Brigadier Govindsamy Mariemuthoo, police spokesman
for the province.

"This kind of thing starts up late at night and then quietens down. It
seems everything is calm but tense in the area this morning."

Clashes broke out in the informal settlement at about 10.45pm on Monday,
possibly sparked by a robbery deep inside the settlement in northern
Johannesburg.

At least five people were wounded on Monday night - four of them
foreigners and one a South African whose screams that he was not a
foreigner were not heeded by the mob who attacked him and left him with
a massive gash on the back of his head.

Eyewitness News reporter Alex Eliseev said running battles took place
throughout the night until calm eventually prevailed from about 1am.

He said a heavy police presence, a patrolling nyala and an overhead
helicopter did much to ensure that there were no more violent outbreaks.

Two injured men were pulled out of the area by paramedics after they
sustained deep cuts to their heads. One of them described having been
attacked with an axe.

A woman and her partner tried to outrun an angry mob of about 20 South
Africans. She fell and was kicked as she lay on the ground before being
wrapped in a blanket and carried to safety by her partner. She was taken
to hospital for treatment.

The South African man who was injured told how an angry mob had asked
him where he was from and then attacked him before he could respond. He
was also taken to hospital with a deep head wound.

Mariemuthoo has maintained the consistent police line that the attacks
were not necessarily motivated by xenophobia and that a criminal motive
was also under investigation.

Local residents were said to be jealous of the success of informal
businesses established by foreigners and were believed to be behind much
of the looting that had taken place.



Police confirm 'tensions' in Kya Sands
Sapa 20 July 2010

Gauteng police could not confirm reports on Tuesday morning that foreign
nationals had been attacked at Kya Sands, north of Johannesburg, saying
only there were "tensions" in the township.

"From yesterday [Monday], there was some stand-off with regards to
tensions there," said Brigadier Govindsamy Mariemuthoo.

"We have a heavy police presence there," he added.

Several radio stations reported on Tuesday that four foreign nationals,
of Zimbabwe and Mozambique, and one South African had been attacked in
overnight clashes.

A Talk Radio 702 journalist reported seeing two men escorted from the
informal settlement with deep cuts to their heads while a woman said she
was kicked in the chest.

Another man was bleeding from a wound to the head.

"I was just sitting at my home and a group of people just came and they
asked me where I come from and before I could answer they started
hitting me," the man told the radio station.

But Mariemuthoo said on Tuesday morning that he was still gathering
details of what had exactly happened and ended the phone call when asked
if foreign nationals were injured.

He could only confirm "allegations of looting".

"There were people claiming they were looted and they were asked to open
cases."

Mariemuthoo said he would have more information later in the day.

The Zimbabwean government said on Monday it had been forced to set up
temporary shelters for Zimbabweans leaving South Africa following
threats of attacks on foreign nationals.

A wave of xenophobic mob attacks hit South Africa two years ago.

More than 60 people were killed and thousands displaced.



Zim sets up tents for nationals fleeing SA
AFP, Sapa HARARE, ZIMBABWE 19 July 2010

Zimbabwe has set up temporary shelters for scores of its nationals
leaving South Africa following threats of attacks on foreigners, an
official said on Monday.

"We have put three big tents in Beitbridge, 10 000 blankets, 20 boxes of
laundry soap and 1 000 buckets," said Madzudzo Pawadyira, head of the
government's civil protection unit. Beitbridge is the main border
crossing to South Africa.

"The same measures have also been put in place in Plumtree to cater for
those returning through the Plumtree border" with Botswana, he added.

Scores of Zimbabweans working and living in South Africa are returning
home after the Socer World Cup, with rumours of xenophobic violence
swirling through poor neighbourhoods, he said.

"Indeed, there has been an increase of volume at Beitbridge, but this is
not only confined to Zimbabweans, but this also includes other nationals
from Zambia and Malawi," Pawadyira said.

"Most of the people who were in South Africa are sending their children
back home. Then you have those who are coming back because their
usefulness in South Africa is no longer required.

"We have put up the contingency plans in partnership with United Nations
agencies such as International Organisation for Migration, other
non-governmental organisations such as Médecins Sans Frontières and
World Vision."

He sought to allay fears of a repeat of the 2008 xenophobic attacks that
left 62 dead and thousands without homes when mobs of South Africans
turned on foreign nationals they accused of taking scarce jobs.

"We have been assured by the South African authorities that they will
stem out out these attacks on foreigners and this is quite encouraging,"
Pawadyira said.

Somalian shot dead at Nyanga shop
A 19-year-old Somalian shop assistant was shot in the face and died in
Nyanga on Monday morning, Western Cape police said.

Captain Ntomboxolo Sitshitshi said the young man had been confronted by
two people who demanded he open the security gate to the tuckshop he
worked at in Vlei Sweet Home Farms in the settlement outside Cape Town.

"While he was searching for the key the suspects fired a shot at him
through the gate, fatally wounding him in the face."

The two then ran away. Sitshitshi said the Somalian owner of the shop
was not hurt.

Sitshitshi said it appeared the two just intended to rob the shop and
the incident was not being treated as a case of xenophobia.

"Not at all, it was just a criminal element," she said. - AFP, Sapa



Dust off the welcome mat for fellow Africans:We must get to the root
of the pressures which fuel xenophobia in this country or the consequences could be dire

FAITH KA-MANZI The Mercury Eye on Civil Society column
20 July 2010

South Africa got rave reviews for hospitality to soccer tourists. But
foreigners at the receiving end were mostly from the West. If you came
here from across the Limpopo or Orange rivers, you were probably not
treated so well. You may even have been called "kwerekwere".

In 2008 xenophobia claimed the lives of more than 60 people, with
several hundred thousand displaced.

A new 100-page report about how Durban civil society reacted, with 500
pages of national reports, can be found on the UKZN website: http://
www.ukzn.ac.za/ccs.

That good work was but a bandage. The disease has returned: South
Africans are again abusing our fellow Africans. In recent days, attacks
occurred from Gauteng's Ekurhuleni to Khayelitsha in the Cape and Dunoon
to Bottlebrush settlement in Chatsworth to Walmer in Port Elizabeth,
where there were two deaths.

How do we stop it? First, politicians must end their denialism. On July
1, ANC national chairman Baleka Mbethe said: "The reported xenophobic
attack after the World Cup does not make any sense. These reports are
irrational and have no basis whatsoever."

On Friday, Police Minister Nathi Mthethwa described Western Cape
xenophobia as "so-called" - implying it did not happen. Police General
Bheki Cele is also a denialist, claiming: "There are a few criminal acts
perpetuated by young children tasked to loot the shops of business
owners' competitors."

As for immigrants on the run, he said: "Those fleeing this so-called
xenophobic violence are seasonal workers who are leaving one province
for another as well as those returning home across our borders after
watching a successful World Cup."

Abducted
Could these out-of-touch officials either resign or at least offer an
apology, so as to reverse the damage done in the minds of an unprepared
police force and anyone else in society who believed them?

Mthethwa and Cele must know their own force is riddled with corrupt
xenophobes. Last weekend the Centre for Civil Society's Anti-Xenophobia
Project filed a complaint when we learned that local Zimbabwean refugees
were being abducted and shaken down for bribes.

On Friday morning, police officers (whose licence plate number was
recorded) rounded up Zimbabweans at the corner of Louis and Albert
(Ingcuce) Streets in central Durban. According to one refugee, willing
to testify in court, the police said: "The World Cup is over. If you
don't have a permit go back to Zimbabwe."

This man and two others were captured at 11am and driven north on the N2
freeway for some distance.

"The police said: 'Make a plan, make a plan.' So I gave them R30, to
cover my friend and myself. The third man gave them R10. We walked all
the way back to town, arriving at 2pm," said one of those who were abducted.

Durban police commissioner Bala Naidoo promised he would investigate.
But this experience, all too common, makes us question whether our
police are adequately prepared, psychologically, to provide places of
safety in Durban when attacks happen.

To their credit, a formidable police presence was important as a
deterrent to xenophobia in Bottlebrush and Mariannhill recently. But
government must do more.

We need to see the municipality providing places of safety and emergency
contributions, instead of leaving this to churches and civil society
like in 2008.

We also must get to the root causes of the problem, to factors causing
desperationimmigration, and to the crazy anger and pressure our
countrymen feel.

Africa's colonisation created artificial national borders in 1885. When
we rebelled, our greatest Pan Africanist leaders, including Samora
Machel, Thomas Sankara, Herbert Chitepo, Patrice Lumumba and Kwame
Nkrumah, were assassinated, often with Western fingerprints on the weapons.

Dictators like Mobutu Sese Seko in the Congo and Robert Mugabe in
Zimbabwe grabbed the spoils, making deals with the South African
government during apartheid in Mobutu's case, and post-apartheid in
Mugabe's.

Joburg mining corporates like Anglo Gold and African Rainbow Minerals
take advantage of the mayhem synonymous with these regimes. The result:
a flood of refugees, including skilled professionals, democrats and
activists denied civil rights and economic justice.

That leads to another source of tension: competition for work. Because
of our government's pro-Western macroeconomic policies, unemployment has
reached extreme levels, with a million jobs lost over the last year.

And misappropriation of monies needed for development includes the still
unexplained escalation of R1.3 billion for Moses Mabhida Stadium, paid
for in part by raiding Durban's reserves.

Frustrations
Not far away are the Kennedy Road shacks. The municipality denied
shackdwellers formal rights to build housing and refused to install
electricity. So fires continue, and 500 shacks were lost during the
weekend before the semi-final World Cup game.

In addition to jobs and housing, another crisis for ordinary people is
the soaring municipal services bill.

While we should be ashamed of our working-class and poor people when
they commit xenophobic acts, our ruling class has made such a mess of
everything, except World Cup parties, that pent-up frustrations are
bound to rise.

The question is whether those without power can redirect their energies,
and those with power can avoid xenophobia-denialism and address the root
causes. How do we use our anger constructively, to eliminate corruption,
misappropriation of state funds, cronyism, inhumane economic policies,
environmental destruction, labour broking, non-delivery of services, and
commercialisation of basic necessities?

In turn, those in power should decolonise and emancipate their minds
from thinking that free-market economic policies will work here any
better than in Greece or the United States.

If xenophobia continues, even at a low-intensity level, this scourge
will have very negative repercussions. Our economic, arts and cultural,
sporting and intellectual exchanges with the rest of the world will be
stained. Bad vibes between our citizens and the rest of the continent
will spread and the hospitality we receive on the continent will cease.

And the Olympic Games bid committee deciding on a host city for 2020
will see what we have been hiding away the last month as dirty laundry.

href="http://www.themercury.co.za/index.php?fArticleId=5562016">http://www.themercury.co.za/index.php?fArticleId=5562016


Faith ka-Manzi is a community scholar at the UKZN Centre for Civil Society.



We Zulus are going to beat you up
Thabiso Thakali 17 July 2010

Moses ka Moyo has lived in Hillbrow for the past 11 years - working
tirelessly as a community activist trying to bring change in the lives
of average people, foreign and local.

His mission, with community workers, has been to create a sense of a
real life in a place where few people would have wanted to live 10 years
ago.

Never before has the Zimbabwean-born Ka Moyo felt as uncertain, or so in
danger of his life, as he did last week.

Along with at least 400 other immigrants living in a block of flats in
Hillbrow, he was one of the recipients of a door-to-door leaflet blitz.

The message was stark. Zimbabweans were urged to be careful because they
were going to be "wiped out".

The letters read: "Zimbabweans we don't like you. You must go back to
your country. You took everything that belongs to us, our jobs and our
women... We Zulus are going to beat you up after the World Cup."

Although he was tempted to write off the faceless threats as crude,
empty intimidation, Ka Moyo said that, for the first time ever, the
message in the letter had stabbed straight through to his heart. He
became unsure and afraid.

"I have a family... children and a wife," he said. "Receiving threats
like this will have an impact on them. When the xenophobic outbreak
happened the last time there was no warning. It gets to you as a person,
even if you might want to dismiss it as scaremongering."

This week the 33-year-old, who also chairs the Hillbrow community
policing forum, and residents of his building were out on the streets,
taking the fight back to their faceless foes.

They embarked on a journey of their own, delivering pamphlets and
messages from one building to another urging both locals and foreigners
living the densely populated Hillbrow to report acts of xenophobia to
the police.

They distributed flyers pleading for tolerance, preaching peace and
providing the contact details of police officers, especially station
commanders, who could be called in the event of an outbreak of violence.

They went into churches, businesses, flats, pubs and restaurants calling
for people to speak out against attacks on foreigners.

"We have urged those who have security to ensure that their gates are
always locked and that their closed-circuit television cameras are
working at all times to pick up any suspicious movements," he said,
walking into the dark alley of an abandoned building where hundreds of
foreigners had found succour.

"The greatest threat is probably to the vulnerable like these who live
in a building that has neither water supply nor electricity. But today
we have to be prepared because we were warned.

"We have developed a number of counter-xenophobic programmes, including
campaigns where we encourage people to get to know one another in the
neighbourhood."

Normal resident meeting agendas have been amended to feature a new item
- the need to forge relationships among locals and foreigners to fight
injustices and disputes together.

"There is no doubt that in some of these meetings, whatever people's
grievances or disputes, there is a tendency by some criminal elements to
use the genuine frustrations of people to fuel xenophobic tensions," Ka
Moyo said. "Nothing can be left to chance now, because the cost will be
a human life."

In Joubert Park, Sydney Radebe, a street patroller, and his colleagues
were just as busy. They were on high alert as they discussed how to
react to any outbreak of xenophobia.

Their mission, like Ka Moyo's, was to unite the community, locals and
foreigners, so that it could speak with a single voice.

"If there is a threat to anyone in the streets we want everybody to know
who to contact and where to go," Radebe said. "Xenophobia is no
different from crime; it is perpetuated by those who show little respect
for human life.

"I joined the street patrols because I wanted to encourage people to
take charge of their own neighbourhood. I want to see peace and
stability reign where I live. I am a community worker."

He said although things had appeared to be calm amid reports of
foreigners being attacked and their businesses looted in other parts of
the country, it would be foolish to believe the battle was won.

"Here in Hillbrow and Joubert Park we never supported this idea of
chasing away foreigners or blaming them for our problems," Radebe said.

"We stood up in 2008 when the xenophobic attacks were spreading like
wild fire and this time we have risen up again beforehand by telling our
community to reject this.

"We have begun a series of meetings with residents in our areas where we
are giving out telephone numbers to reach us in an emergency."

In Yeoville, the familiar litany of complaints against foreigners was
being passionately rolled out: they commit crimes; they hold jobs locals
deserve; they steal ID books from locals; and they fraudulently marry
South Africans without their knowledge.

Busisiwe Mthimkhulu, a Yeoville resident married to a Cameroonian, said
that as a Christian she did not believe in killing or attacking people
in their homes.

But, she said, something had to be done about the unwanted and bad
immigrants who were "destroying the country".

"There are bad people among them," she said: "A South African may take
your cellphone, but he won't kill you. A foreigner will take your phone
and kill you."

Beyond that, she said, immigrants were also too easy to exploit.

"Business people hire foreigners, not because they work hard, but
because they do the job for less money," she said.

"A South African demands his rights and will go on strike. Foreigners
are afraid."

Mthimkhulu said that while many locals did not hate foreigners, they
despised their actions, especially criminal ones.

For Ka Moyo, though, no amount of xenophobic threats will deter him from
his bid to unite the people who live in his neighbourhood to fight for a
better life with access to water, electricity and decent housing.

"There is no way I'm going to leave Hillbrow now after 11 years of
living here," he said.

This article was originally published on page 11 of The Star on July 17,
2010



Agent provocateurs' behind attacks: Malema
Esther Lewis Staff Reporter 19 July 2010

ANC Youth League president Julius Malema says people who chased
foreigners out of Mbekweni near Paarl last week should be ashamed of
themselves.

But neither Malema nor Deputy Police Minister Fikile Mbalula believe
that tension in the area is a result of xenophobia. Instead, they blame
"agent provocateurs" who "enjoy violence among blacks".

On Sunday the duo, joined by Drakenstein mayor Charmaine Manuel, visited
121 foreigners living at the Antoniesvlei camping site after fleeing
their homes amid fears of an outbreak of xenophobic violence on the
night that the World Cup ended.

Malema and Mbalula condemned the attacks.

"You hosted us when the boers were chasing... and killing us. You opened
your homes and said we are all Africans.

"If any ANC people were involved in chasing you away... they don't
belong in the ANC," Malema told the foreigners.

He said the "artificial borders" separating African countries were
imposed on people by colonial powers, and only people who did not know
their history would chase other Africans away.

Speaking about locals' attitudes, Malema said people should stop blaming
others for unemployment.

He said the "agent provocateurs" involved in inciting the recent
violence would be exposed. "They enjoy violence among blacks. They enjoy
us killing each other. They can't sleep when we have peace."

Mbalula claimed that criminals were hiding behind a concept they did not
understand - xenophobia - and that the definition of this word needed to
be debated. He asked why white foreigners had not been affected in the
Western Cape if it was xenophobia.

He also challenged the notion that foreigners were taking jobs from locals.

"What are these jobs the people have taken from you? Working in a
madam's kitchen, saying: 'Yes, madam, no, baas.' Earning peanuts and
being treated like dogs? Is that the jobs? Those are not real jobs,"
Mbalula said.

If the attacks were related to jobs, why were they not directed at
university professors and other professionals, he asked.

Manuel said a task team made up of municipal officials, NGOs, the police
and religious leaders were working on a reintegration plan.

In most communities, people had said they would have no problem
welcoming foreigners back, but young people in two areas were opposed to
foreigners returning.

Mbalula, Malema and Manuel spent time in Paarl East on Sunday in honour
of Nelson Mandela's 92nd birthday, at a lunch for the residents of the
Rusthof Old Age Home, which was damaged in a fire in May. The three
handed over blankets and gas heaters.

This article was originally published on page 5 of The Cape Argus on
July 19, 2010



Institutionalised xenophobia?
KARABO KEEPILE JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA - 19 July 2010

Reports of escalating violence against foreign nationals living in South
Africa have again come to the fore.

However non-South Africans face a more insidious form of prejudice
inherent in the system on a day-to-day basis. Has xenophobia become
institutionalised? We look at various areas where foreigners are
systemically disadvantaged.

The lucky 13 digits
Try opening a store account, obtaining credit bureau reports or using
certain websites without a South African Identity Document. You're not
likely to get very far.

"You have institutions like banks and to some extent hospitals that are
just insensitive to the variety of people likely to be their clients,"
Tara Polzer, senior researcher at Wits University's Forced Migration
Studies Programme told the Mail & Guardian.

Either policy or computer systems dictate that certain institutions can
only accept 13 number digits --excluding foreign nationals without an ID.

Home loans
Peter* is a qualified chartered accountant from Zimbabwe who has worked
in South Africa for the past three years.

He is currently employed by the government of South Africa as a senior
manager and said it was a nightmare to get a mortgage loan with a civil
servant's pay slip.

"When I finally got it, I am inherently classified as a higher risk
profile -- hence I pay more interest than a South African with the same
credit record as mine and the same job and risk profile."

Car Loans
As a Zimbabwean he hasn't had much more luck with car financing either.
Peter said he and his wife have been trying to get a car loan for the
past three years and not succeeded -- despite their perfect credit records.

"All the big four banks have told us to bring a South African driver's
licence. We both have international driver's licences which are accepted
by all insurance companies -- what a contradiction."

He tried converting to a South African licence but the traffic
department only makes the service available to permanent residents --
not those with work permits.

Given that one can ordinarily only apply for a permanent residence
permit after six years of living in South Africa, a foreigner can
effectively only get a car loan after six years of staying in the country.

Internet services
Almost all internet-linked services in South Africa require an ID.

"My wife could not apply for an overdraft facility over the internet
because she had to put in a South African ID number, so she had to visit
the branch personally," said Peter.

Even Primedia's Eyewitness news sms breaking alert required a South
African ID number.

The one exception was a bitter one -- the South African Revenue Service
allows tax returns to be submitted electronically without a South
African ID.

Cellphone contracts and work permits
While foreign nationals are allowed to take out a cellphone contract,
those whom the M&G spoke to said it was often quite difficult, as one
had to convince those helping at the store that this was actually possible.

Business Day Journalist, Wilson Johwa, had to resort to getting a
cellphone contract in his girlfriend's name.

South African work permit
He said the main challenge that arose when making the transition from
his home country to South Africa was navigating the bureaucracy and
getting a work permit.

"The difficulty with the work permit was with collecting the documents."

Apart from his passport, he needed:

The advert he responded to

A letter from his employer motivating why he was chosen

A list of the names of the people who applied for the same position and
didn't make it

A security clearance from his home country and other countries he had
lived in the previous five years

Johwa said this often proves difficult as it requires an employer who is
cooperative and willing to do those things on behalf of a foreigner.

International students
Marcel*, an international BSC student at Wits University said the
greatest challenge facing foreign students was having to pay for a full
years tuition upfront at the beginning of the year.
As a student from the Southern African Development Community (Sadc) he
said he was required to pay a smaller fee in comparison to other
students who are not from the Sadc region.

If a Kenyan student for example wanted to study medicine at Wits they
would be required to pay R138 000 -- and the amount goes up every year.

"If you are a son of an average man in South Africa and you have to pay
R40 000 upfront, it's quite a lot. This is even worse if you come from a
middle-class family from another African country because the Rand is
relatively strong."

Finding accommodation like a flat, he said, was another difficulty.

"You have to produce documents to show how much revenue you earn but
because I am on a student permit I have to use documents that belong to
someone else who lives here and has a job."

Michael Barre, an international student from Gabon, said he had often
found himself in a similar predicament.

"I've been looking for a job since December last year, but every time I
have interviews with an employer, they ask me if I have a work permit.
When I ask the employer for the letter that will allow me to get a work
permit they refuse."

Foreign national drivers
According to the South African Services website a foreign driver's
licence or international driver's permit can only exchanged for a South
African licence if the applicant is a permanent resident.

Barre said he carried a large file of documents when driving in South
Africa to ward off the constant hassles from traffic cops.

To get into the traffic system as a foreign national, he said he needed
to present his drivers licence, obtained from his home country, a
traffic register number his passport and a study permit.

When he gets pulled over by traffic cops he now also presents a letter
from his embassy proving that his Gabonese driver's licence is valid.

"I always showed my traffic register number and my driver's licence only
but there was this traffic guy who complained that I needed a letter
from the embassy, so I carry that too."
Berre said he was not sure if that was required by South African law or
whether the traffic officer he met on that particular day wanted a bribe.

Opening Bank Accounts
Non-South Africans the M&G spoke to complained that some banks did not
want to open bank accounts for them because they did not have an ID.

While South Africa's big four banks open bank accounts for foreign
nationals others, like Capitec Bank, insisted on a South African ID.

Jennifer*, who is also from Zimbabwe, works as an analyst in a South
African bank, and has been in the country for six years.

In May she was told by Capitec Bank, of an advisory issued to them by
the Financial Intelligence Centre (FIC) stating that foreigners could
only open bank accounts if they had permanent residency, with the only
exception being mineworkers.

According to Capitec, as they are not an authorised dealer in foreign
exchange, they are not permitted to open bank accounts for non-residents.

The ban extends to foreign nationals with a valid passport and temporary
residence permit or temporary work or quota permit.

Jennifer said these tight and confusing credit policies had forced her
to invest overseas.

"I am now investing in property overseas simply because the banks here
will only fund me with a 50% deposit, despite a six year flawless credit
history, and an overseas bank will fund me with a smaller deposit."

She said these polices put in place by companies and legislators needed
to be rethought.
"[They] need to think out of the box and develop policies that allow
people that work here to spend and invest in South Africa. A South
African ID shouldn't be the be-all and end-all of everything".



Civil society sets up warning system for xenophobia
LIONEL FAULL | JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA - 15 July 2010

Civil society organisations are mobilising to ensure there is no repeat
of the large-scale xenophobic violence which scarred South Africa in 2008.

The flurry of activity by the organisations this week contradicted
police spokesperson Zweli Mnisi's assurances that reports of attacks on
foreigners in parts of the Western Cape and Gauteng this week were not
necessarily xenophobic.

Mnisi told the Mail & Guardian that attacks on foreign nationals were
"just [acts of] criminality". He added that "today it's called
xenophobia, tomorrow it could be called racism or sexism".

The Humanitarian Assistance Network of South Africa (HANSA) met on
Wednesday to finalise the coordination of civil society's response in
the event of concerted attacks on foreign nationals.

HANSA was established after the 2008 xenophobic violence to coordinate
future humanitarian assistance efforts by civil society organisations
and plans to launch an "anti-xenophobic action" (AXA) hotline on July 16.

The national toll-free hotline is to be staffed by multilingual foreign
nationals, and would be operational 24 hours a day, seven days a week,
according to HANSA spokesperson Warren Viljoen.

However, Viljoen was reluctant to release the 0800 number to the public
before all operational matters had been finalised.

Early-warning system
Viljoen said that the AXA hotline would act as an early-warning system.
"Where possible, information from callers will be verified by our ground
support staff, before we forward information to police at a national and
regional level, as well as relevant humanitarian and civil society
organisations on the ground."

Six staff members and four vehicles are available in Gauteng to verify
reports of xenophobia, but the unit might be split to provide capacity
in the Western Cape.

"We intend to have a turn-around time of between two- and six hours from
when we receive a call, verify it, to when we forward it to police and
civil society organisations," Viljoen said.

The hotline and ground support initiative was funded by the United
Nations High Commission for Refugees.

Meanwhile, Lawyers for Human Rights (LHR) also convened a meeting with
eight legal organisations on Wednesday, including the Legal Resources
Centre, Legal Aid SA and Probono.org, to plan the immediate roll-out of
legal services to foreign nationals in Gauteng and KwaZulu-Natal.

Kaajal Ramjathan-Keogh, head of the LHR's refugee and migrant rights
programme, told the Mail & Guardian that the meeting had finalised a
roster of legal personnel to be deployed at short notice. Legal
personnel would be available to assist foreign nationals to open cases
of harassment and intimidation with the police, and to monitor the
progress of cases through the judicial system.

LHR was also equipped to provide foreign nationals with advice on asylum
and immigration law, and has offered its services to the ustice department.

Ramjathan-Keogh also revealed that the protection working group (PWG), a
collaboration between United Nations agencies, non-governmental
organisations and civil society, had been working on a comprehensive
contingency plan over the past 18 months.

"In the event of large-scale human displacement, the plan can be
activated at a moment's notice," she said.

Contigency plan
Oxfam country director for South Africa, Innocent Nkata, confirmed that
a multi-organisational contingency plan was in place.

"Our hope is that any xenophobic violence can be contained, but in the
event of an escalation, we are equipped to support the public health
needs of up to 10 000 displaced people," Nkata said.

While Oxfam was focussed on the provision of basic sanitation, other
organisations are primed to contribute in their areas of expertise.

Nkata said that civil society has learned from its shortcomings before,
during and after the xenophobic attacks of 2008.

"There was limited coordination by civil society organisations amongst
themselves, and between themselves and government. But through networks
such as HANSA and the PWG, we are working together to share information,
coordinate our actions, and avoid duplicating our efforts."

In addition to HANSA and the PWG, the South African Council of Churches
(SACC) has convened three meetings at its Khotso House headquarters in
Johannesburg since Tuesday last week to discuss threats of xenophobia.

The meetings have swelled from 15 organisations to more than 100
organisations since last week, says SACC general secretary Eddie Makue.

"The SACC has been mandated to assist in combining the efforts of these
organisations, all of whom have been alert to the issue of xenophobia in
South Africa for a long time," Makue said.



President speaks out against xenophobia
Alex Eliseev 15 July

President Jacob Zuma has called for calm, tolerance and unity as the
country faces a threat of xenophobic violence.

Zuma said on Thursday he is concerned by reports of foreign nationals
fleeing South Africa after being threatened.

Earlier on Thursday, police Minister Nathi Mthethwa denied any
xenophobic attacks have taken place after the World Cup, saying isolated
cases were nothing more than regular crimes.

The president said South Africans have to work with foreigners to find
and report those bent on causing mayhem across communities.

He added South Africans showed the world they were peace-loving and
hospitable during the World Cup and this spirit has to continue.

Zuma said those making the threats wish to sow pain and destruction and
police are doing everything they can to make sure this does not happen.

More than 60 people were murdered in 2008 when xenophobic attacks spread
across the country.

(Edited by Deshnee Subramany)



Attacks 'were criminality disguised as xenophobia'
Sapa PRETORIA, SOUTH AFRICA 15 July 2010

Police Minister Nathi Mthethwa on Thursday dismissed reports of
xenophobic attacks in some parts of the country, saying it was just a
"squall of bad omen" becoming louder.

"Xenophobia is not going to happen. I call on people and the media not
to be part of peddling this hysteria of a possible outbreak ... There is
no such systematic thing as xenophobia in the country," Mthethwa told
media in Pretoria.

He said these were "dangerous rumours" and risked being self-fulfilling.

Police commissioner General Bheki Cele said that a week before the
Soccer World Cup, about 11 buses carrying Zimbabwean nationals had
entered the country, but the media did not report that.

"No one reported on that but now they are focusing on those leaving,"
said Cele.

There had been incidents linked to xenophobic attacks in the Western
Cape on Sunday night where a number of foreign-owned spaza shops and
container shops were burned and looted.

Some vandalism and attempted looting continued during the day on Monday
in Khayelitsha, where police helped Somali shop owners to remove their
goods.

Mthethwa, who visited the area on Monday, emphasised that they were not
dismissing reports of xenophobic attacks, but that investigations
revealed that xenophobia was not the case, but rather "criminality
disguised as xenophobia".

"We don't take people's lives for granted."

Cele said a number of meetings had taken place in communities where
incidents were reported and that feedback received from community
members was that they had no intention of driving out foreign nationals.

He singled out "criminal elements", aged 13 to 25, who terrorised
people, adding that a dozen of them had been arrested. -- Sapa



Johannesburg - The ANC on Thursday called on communities to name and
shame those involved in attacks against foreigners.

SAPA

"Let us all help the law enforcement agencies by identifying, naming and
shaming those who are involved in such clear act(s) of criminality,"
spokesperson Jackson Mthembu said in a statement.

The ruling party condemned the criminal behaviour "in the strongest terms".

"We urge the law enforcement agencies to continue with their good work
in identifying these hooligans and detain them."

Those carrying out these acts were not friends of former president
Nelson Mandela, who celebrates his birthday on Sunday, Mthembu said.

The party earlier this month rejected reports there could be a repeat,
after the World Cup, of the xenophobic violence of 2008 which left 62
people dead and thousands displaced.

Mthembu initially described the claims as "mischievous and disingenuous"
while President Jacob Zuma this week described reported attacks as
"rumours".

"There have been reports, which we don't know the source of yet, that in
fact there will be xenophobia attacks after 2010 (World Cup). We are not
necessarily failing to do our duty to ensure that it does not happen,
but let us just make a distinction between a rumour and a real concrete
report with a clear source of information."

Government was, however, "on top of the situation", Mthembu said.



Xenophobia: Cops go door-to-door
15 July 2010

Polokwane - Police in Musina, Limpopo, have embarked on an awareness
campaign to encourage locals to be tolerant of foreign nationals.

Musina, which is situated at the Beit Bridge border post between South
African and Zimbabwe, is known as the Gateway to Africa and has a high
number of documented and un-documented foreigners from Zimbabwe,
Mozambique, Zambia, Nigeria, the Democratic Republic of Congo and even
Pakistan and India.

"Since the report of possible xenophobic attacks came out last week, we
started an awareness campaign on Monday at Nancefield, Weipe and Mopani
farms and Doreen, as well as other areas," said Musina police
spokesperson Sydney Ringane.

He said more than 600 illegal immigrants cross the Limpopo River into
Musina every day seeking asylum, before dispersing further into the
country once they have received their asylum documents.

Ringane said that since Monday, members of the Musina Social Crime
Prevention Unit had been visiting communities to spread a message of peace.

"We visit locals and foreigners at their homes and businesses and ask
their views about xenophobia and use that information to asses if there
is any danger of an attack on foreigners,” said Ringane.

Tolerance
So far, the general mood in the town is one of tolerance, he said.

"People from Musina are far from being xenophobic as they are used to
being integrated with foreigners, especially Zimbabweans and
Mozambicans," he said.

He said that the xenophobic violence that plagued the rest of the
country in 2008, had not affected Musina either.

"Most of our local community are married to foreigners and we visit each
other from time to time which is why it should not be possible for
xenophobia to happen here," he said.

He debunked misperceptions that crimes are perpetrated by foreign nationals.

"Our crime records (in Musina) reflect normal crimes that we've always
had, like robbery, rape, assault, theft and house-breaking.

These crimes are committed by both locals and foreigners and, even in
our cells, we have a balanced number of locals and nationals,” Ringane said.
- African Eye



Xenophobia a capitalist plot: Sasco
Sasco 15 July 2010

We are convinced that these xenophobic attacks are not spontaneous acts
of hatred for foreign nationals but are meticulously planned to
destabilize the country and threaten the stability of the nation, the SA
Students Congress says.


Sasco president Mbulelo Mandlana says: "We are disgusted by the recent
spate of isolated xenophobic attacks that took place in some parts of
the Western Cape, a day after the Soccer World Cup. We do understand and
regret that there is a strong xenophobic element amongst the South
African working class as a result of contestation for resources, but we
believe there is more to these attacks than meets the eye. We condemn
all forms of xenophobia wherever they are. We are going to carryout real
campaigns that highlight our position to these barbaric acts in
different campuses in our country".

He says the attacks are not only aimed at foreign nationals but are
aimed at the country itself. "There is possibly of a conspiracy far
wider than the conspiracies seen before".

"We call on our country’s Intelligence network to investigate the
possibility of a wider conspiracy against our young democratic
dispensation. Our security personnel should stomp the length and breadth
of our society seeking out those who wish to destabilize our country.
Our security services must ensure that the criminals involved in these
incidents do not hide behind the woodworks of xenophobia," says Mandlana.

He says Sasco also believes that had it not been for the capitalist
nature of our society, the threat of xenophobia would not be an ever
present possibility.

"Xenophobia, racism, sexism and all forms of discrimination are
by-products of the current mode of production, without which it cannot
survive. It is for this reason that we place our energies as Sasco at
the disposal of the struggle for the total emancipation of the working
people and the effort for a fundamental transformation of our country,"
he says.



Xenophobic attacks are not spontaneous!
SASCO PRESS STATEMENT: 15 July 2010

We are disgusted by the recent spate of isolated xenophobic attacks that
took place in some parts of the Western Cape, a day after the Soccer
World Cup. We do understand and regret that there is a strong xenophobic
element amongst the South African working class as a result of
contestation for resources, but we believe there is more to these
attacks than meets the eye. We condemn all forms of xenophobia wherever
they are. We are going to carryout real campaigns that highlight our
position to these barbaric acts in different campuses in our country.

We are convinced that these xenophobic attacks are not spontaneous acts
of hatred for foreign nationals but are meticulously planned to
destabilize the country and threaten the stability of the nation. These
xenophobic attacks are not only aimed at foreign nationals but are aimed
at the country itself. There is possibly of a conspiracy far wider than
the conspiracies seen before.

We call on our country’s Intelligence network to investigate the
possibility of a wider conspiracy against our young democratic
dispensation. Our security personnel should stomp the length and breadth
of our society seeking out those who wish to destabilize our country.
Our security services must ensure that the criminals involved in these
incidents do not hide behind the woodworks of xenophobia.

We also believe that had it not been for the capitalist nature of our
society, the threat of xenophobia would not be an ever present
possibility. Xenophobia, racism, sexism and all forms of discrimination
are by-products of the current mode of production, without which it
cannot survive. It is for this reason that we place our energies as
SASCO at the disposal of the struggle for the total emancipation of the
working people and the effort for a fundamental transformation of our
country.

For details Contact
Mbulelo Mandlana (President)
071 879 3408
Or
Lazola Ndamase (Secretary General)
082 679 8718



Journo attack 'influenced by xenophobia'
IOL 15 July 2010

The Daily Sun said that it was standing by a report it published on
Thursday which described a xenophobic assault on one of its journalists.

"The reporter is sticking to the story and it is backed up by a local
councillor," said Daily Sun editor-in-chief Themba Khumalo.

Khumalo promised that more revelations on the attack would be published
on Friday.

"We are amplifying it in tomorrow's newspaper."

According to the report, Daily Sun journalist Brian Kajengo was struck
on the head with a piece of firewood by an unemployed builder.

The article was accompanied by a photo of the bleeding Kajengo, who was
born in Zimbabwe but has lived in South Africa since 2003.

Kajengo wrote that the attack had started with three Mozambican
nationals being attacked in two separate incidents.

Mpumalanga police had denied that the assault on Kajengo was a
xenophobic attack.

Captain Leonard Hlathi said Kajengo, 39, was assaulted in a fight about
a cellphone at Mapulaneng on Sunday.

"The fight was about a cellphone which was allegedly stolen and sold to
a Zimbabwean man. The owner traced it and went to get it on Sunday,"
Hlathi said.

"The man found in possession of the cellphone apologised and the matter
was resolved."

The Zimbabwean found in possession of the phone apparently went to
report the matter to his countryman, Kajengo.

"After that Kajengo and 12 other men went to confront the owner of the
phone and a fight ensued. Kajengo was injured in the forehead and a case
of assault was opened.

"Allegations that the incident was influenced by xenophobia are
unfounded and malicious," Hlathi said.

The man who allegedly assaulted Kajengo was arrested and appeared in the
Mapulaneng Magistrate's Court on Tuesday. He was released on R1 000
bail. - Sapa



Attacks are about business not hatred: cops
Mandilakhe Tshwete 15 July 2010

Cops are saying that several attacks on foreigners in rural areas are
related to fights over business territory and not xenophobia.

A Somali shopowner's house was petrol-bombed in Grabouw over the past
weekend.

In another incident, cops are looking for a large number of suspects who
robbed a Somali-owned shop in the area of R4 000 in cash as well as
cigarettes and airtime on Monday.

But cop sources say even though the attacks were aimed at foreigners,
they suspect that it might actually be fights over business territory
and not related to xenophobic attacks which have flared up across the
Western Cape in the past week.

In a similar incident in Worcester last week, two Somali men died and
two others were wounded when their Avian Park tuck shop was attacked.

Police spokesperson Captain Mzikayise Moloi says no arrests have been made.

Meanwhile, De Doorns Police Station Commander Desmond van der Westhuizen
says the area that was torn apart by attacks on Zimbabweans last year is
relatively quiet.

"We have had no such incidents and we hope it stays that way," he says.
- Daily Voice



Residents urge foreigners to return
Natasha Prince and Nurene Jassiem 15 July 2010

The provincial government departments assisting foreigners who fled to
safety in the Cape Winelands say a number of them have returned to the
areas they left.

On Wednesday provincial government department spokesperson, Daniella
Ebenezer said only 140 of the 250 foreigners who were taken to
Antoniesvlei Hall in Wellington, remained there. About 110 people who
were brought to the hall this week have returned to their communities.

On Sunday night, while the world watched the World Cup final, hundreds
of foreigners who have businesses in the Mbekweni informal settlement in
Paarl and the New Rest settlement in Wellington were escorted to safety
by police when local residents began looting their shops.

The foreigners were taken to Antoniesvlei resort and were housed in a
hall. But the SA National Civic Organisation (Sanco) secretary-general
for the Boland area Peboho Majela, said local residents have called for
the foreigners to return.

He said a "well attended" community meeting was held on Tuesday night,
where residents insisted the foreigners come back to the community.

"Not a single member was doubting whether to bring back the foreigners,"
he said.

He said that Sanco members in the area were planning to recruit
foreigners in these areas on street committees they hoped to form.

"We're trying to convince them to come back and we're coming with a
different position. We are going to adopt some of the foreigners on our
committees, when we revive the street committees," he said.

Provincial police spokesperson Captain Frederick van Wyk, said on
Wednesday that so far the area was reported to have been "quiet" after
Sunday night. He said police would maintain "a visible presence" in the
affected areas.

Meanwhile, Ebenezer said the eight foreigners who were staying at a
church in Hanover Park had returned to the areas from which they fled.

Also, the 25 displaced people staying at a school in Delft remain and 49
are being housed in a church in Franschhoek.

Ebenezer said there were also no more foreigners along the N1 or at the
Huguenot tunnel, where they had been the past few weeks, hoping to catch
a ride out of the Western Cape.

Civic organisations on Wednesday called on government to recognise that
xenophobic attacks were happening in the Western Cape. The plea came a
few days after the Cape Argus reported president Jacob Zuma saying that
the threats of an outbreak of xenophobic violence in South Africa were
still rumours.

The Social Justice Coalition, Equal Education and the Treatment Action
Campaign released a statement criticising government's failure to
acknowledge the xenophobic nature of the recent attacks on foreigners.

"In our view, it appears that senior police and the intelligence
services have failed to properly brief President Zuma and the cabinet.
Many senior officials appear reluctant to use the term "xenophobia" in
the hope that this will result in violence subsiding."

The three organisations have been holding workshops in Makhaza in
Khayelitsha since last month's attacks on at least three Somali-owned
shops in the area.

"We have been engaging with broader civil society networks and forums,
but our joint work has been limited to Khayelitsha," they said.

"During this work it was found that fear of attacks after the World Cup
was indeed very prevalent (among both locals and immigrants), and that
many immigrants were being directly and indirectly threatened and
intimidated."

The group said it found that in most cases where foreigners were
attacked in Khayelitsha police responded quickly and effectively "under
difficult conditions".

Meanwhile the Western Cape Religious Leaders Forum, under the
chairmanship of Dr Thabo Makgoba, Anglican Archbishop of Cape Town, held
a special consultative forum to discuss the recent attacks on
foreigners. It urged the police to work with local communities in
isolating those who were responsible.

* This article was originally published on page 3 of Cape Argus on
July 15, 2010



Blame-game solves little
Our Opinion 16 July 2010

THE debate about xenophobia in South Africa needs to be tackled with
sobriety and introspection rather than the ill-considered “debate” of
the moment.

We are witnessing nothing more than a blame game over whether or not a
wave of xenophobic attacks is imminent .

The government blames the media and civil society for distorting
incidents into a xenophobic context.

The media and the civil society say , yet again, the government is in
denial and that it will, yet again, be embarrassed by a wave of violence
such as that witnessed in 2008 which cost the lives of more than 60 people.

The truth, we believe, is more complex. There is an element of truth in
the positions of all parties to this discussion.

The government is correct to be suspicious of the timing of these
rumours of an imminent uprising.

For this to have surfaced on the eve of the World Cup and then to have
found more traction now as it ends cannot be a co incidence.

We believe that a thorough inquiry is needed to understand the source of
these recent rumours and the agendas which lie behind them.

However, the government is also right to criticise the media for its
latest reporting on this xenophobia phenomenon which has largely lacked
depth and substance.

Much of this reporting has easily fallen into the trap of associating
incidents with xenophobia even when this link may not have existed.

Generally, though, there has been little effort to understand the
reasons why xenophobia is so deep-seated in South Africa and what needs
to be done to eradicate such attitudes.

The sad truth is that current events confirm what many have predicted
for the last two years. The threat of this “time bomb” of xenophobic
violence exploding now is about the same as it has been since the
attacks of two years ago.

There is no sudden upsurge of prejudice in our community. The evil that
is there has always been there.

As Jacob Dlamini illustrates in an article on this page, the suspicion
and hatred of foreigners in South Africa is deep-seated and real, even
among police officers.

Two years ago the State was shown how easy it can be to inflame these
prejudices and how easily they can be turned into a savage tsunami of
violence.

Little has been done to extract the rotting root of xenophobia from our
society so we should not be shocked when such violence occurs again.

Another wave of attacks will not be unexpected.

This time we know what could happen if we don’t act to stop it. And, if
we don’t, what kind of people are we?



I knew I couldn't stay and take chances'
RAY NDLOVU | BULAWAYO, ZIMBABWE 15 July 2010

In Old Magwegwe township about 20km from Bulawayo, I meet Brian Moyo*, a
tall, dark 32-year-old Zimbabwean who returned home this past weekend
after receiving threats to leave Tembisa township in South Africa's East
Rand area -- where he had lived for five years.

"I was a victim of xenophobia back in 2008 and when my landlord warned
me last week to leave as something bad might happen to me soon, I knew
that I couldn't stay there anymore and take any chances", he said.

Brian held out his left hand to show me the stub of an index finger that
was allegedly cut by attackers one night during the xenophobic violence
in May 2008. He also pointed to his left ear, the top part of which was
cut off, and says softly: "They told me that this time I would be killed
if I stayed". He slowly moved his head sideways, perhaps reflecting on
the grave warning he received.

'Not just a rumour'
For Brian, the threats of xenophobic violence against foreigners soon
after South Africa's Soccer World Cup are not "just a rumour" as claimed
by some. He bears constant reminders: his old wounds. As early as May
this year, the Consortium for Refugees and Migrants in South Africa
warned that "a month from the opening match of the World Cup, threats
were mounting of further mass xenophobic violence once the event is
over". And since the beginning of July, scores of Zimbabweans fearing an
outbreak of xenophobic violence in South Africa have been returning
home, laden with their belongings and congesting the Beitbridge border post.

A resident at the border-town, Latoya Mjungwa, noted the unusually high
number of arrivals, especially in the early mornings and late at night,
as well as the increased movement of property by cross-border traders.
Charles Gwede, assistant regional manager-in-charge of Beitbridge border
post, said: "At this stage it is difficult to tell whether people are
fleeing the possible attacks or not, but we will continue to monitor the
situation".

Observers have warned that xenophobic violence would not just affect
foreign nationals, but would also devastate the good image that South
Africa had built around the World Cup. The International Organisation
for Migration estimates that at least two million Zimbabweans live in
South Africa, with more living in the United Kingdom, the United States
and Canada.

The economic meltdown in the country -- which began in 2000 when Zanu-PF
linked war veterans and youth militia invaded white-owned farms and
began a political climate of intimidation, violence and human rights
abuses -- caused many to flee the country in search of better living
conditions.

"Sell outs"
"The mistake that people make is that they just think of this as another
rumour and that way when the attacks really begin no one will be
prepared to help victims", says Brian.

"Locals in the community where I lived made door-to-door visits to tip
us of what's going to happen. It was easy for them to do so because they
knew beforehand where each foreigner lives and what nationality one is."

According to Moyo, the door-to-door visits were conducted at night when
local residents "knew that most foreigners would be back from work" and
at times used other Zimbabweans to show them where their fellow
countrymen lived.

"Zimbabweans sold each other out", he claims.

Dilemma for constitution-making process
The country's main political parties, Zanu-PF and the Movement for
Democratic Change (MDC) -- it also emerged -- are keenly watching the
influx of Zimbabweans from South Africa and the impact this could have
on the ongoing constitution-making process run by the constitutional
parliamentary committee (Copac). An MDC legislator involved with Copac
who requested anonymity said, "This is a big issue for us as Copac, as
some of the people that are coming back have South African passports,
but they are Zimbabweans. I think this is a chance for them to seriously
take up the issue of dual citizenship because they are still Zimbabweans".

"We can't exclude people who are highly skilled from helping to rebuild
the country on the basis that they hold another citizenship. Their input
in this process is important".

Zanu-PF has objected to dual citizenship, while the MDC supports it.
Echoing sentiments similar to that of the MDC, civic society has called
for a "constitution that reflects the realities of the day".

Dumisani Nkomo, Matabeleland Civic Society Consortium spokesperson said:
"This is the present reality that many Zimbabweans live outside the
country and are citizens of where they live".

As for Moyo, he feels safer at home and will watch developments in South
Africa while in Zimbabwe.

*Not his real name



Fear Drives Migrants Home
United Nations 15 July 2010

Harare — John Muswere, 34, arrived four hours ago at the main bus
terminus in Harare, capital of Zimbabwe, after making an unplanned
journey with his wife, their three-year-old child and few household
possessions from Johannesburg, South Africa, where he spent 18 months
working as a mechanic.

"I am left with little money on me because I left South Africa in a
hurry and before my employer could pay me. All the transport operators
are saying my money is too little and I don't know how I am going to
leave this place [the bus terminus]," Muswere told IRIN while his wife
tried to pacify their wailing child.

The hasty trip was prompted by rumours that foreigners would be targeted
once the FIFA World Cup finished, just as they were in May 2008, when 62
people were killed and more than 100,000 displaced.

Since the final game on 11 July there have been numerous attacks on
foreign nationals and their businesses, mainly in Western Cape Province.
The Forced Migration Studies Programme (FMSP) of the University of the
Witwatersrand, in Johannesburg, estimates that 1.2 million Zimbabweans
live in South Africa, mostly arriving in the past decade after their
country's economy collapsed.

"I will be starting from scratch, and at no time has life been so
uncertain for me. I don't know how I am going to feed the family because
it might be a long time before I get a job here," Muswere said. His
uncle has offered them temporary accommodation.

The threats began a few months before the soccer world cup, and came in
the form of notes pasted on the door of their one-room rented flat in
the inner-city suburb of Berea, Johannesburg, "telling me that they
would kill me and my family if I remained in their country after the
World Cup".

I thought they were mere threats until they accosted my neighbour, who
was coming from night duty at a local supermarket where he worked as a
security guard, poured petrol on him and set him alight

The notes accused Muswere and other Zimbabweans in the suburb of
"stealing their sisters, jobs and houses".

"I thought they were mere threats until they accosted my neighbour, who
was coming from night duty at a local supermarket where he worked as a
security guard, poured petrol on him and set him alight. Fortunately, he
survived but he is still in hospital," said Muswere.

Grace Takawira, 46, arrived on the same bus as Muswere after travelling
from Western Cape, where she had been employed as a domestic worker for
the past four years. "I just packed my few belongings and hitch-hiked to
Johannesburg, where I boarded a bus to Harare," Takawira told IRIN.

"I had seen several Zimbabweans and other foreigners being attacked
shortly after the World Cup ended. Many foreigners who feared for their
lives sought shelter at police stations, but I could not stand the idea
of living as a refugee." She has decided to try cross-border trading to
feed her three children.

"Hundreds of Zimbabweans are crossing back to Zimbabwe on a daily basis
as they flee xenophobic attacks," said the bus driver, who plies the
Harare-Johannesburg route but declined to be identified.

Burdening a weak economy
"Most of them are in a desperate situation, as they don't have enough
money for bus fares. Some of them only managed enough money to come as
far as Beitbridge [on the Zimbabwe side of the border] and are squatting
in that town," he told IRIN.

"The South African government should improve on its policies, so that
more jobs are created and there is greater literacy among citizens of
that country," John Makumbe, a Harare based political analyst, told IRIN.

"It is clear that high levels of unemployment, widespread poverty, and
low levels of skills are contributing to xenophobia among South
Africans, who see foreigners as the main cause of their problems."

Innocent Makwiramiti, an economist and former chief executive officer of
the Zimbabwe National Chamber of Commerce, expected problems. "The
economy is still weak and the return of Zimbabweans from South Africa
will push up unemployment. While those that are returning might have
skills in their respective professions, it will be difficult for them to
start their own ventures because they don't have the capital."

[ This report does not necessarily reflect the views of the United Nations ]



South African people and its government have betrayed Africa
BONGI DLODLO Zimbabwe Telegraph 16 July 2010

To fathom that few weeks ago we were like one African family cheering
behind the bafana-bafana team is quite shocking. The South African flag
was on almost every car, house ,College, university and, for once,
Africa’s hopes were revived. Indeed it is time for Africa. Where has
this xenophobia come from then? To make matters worse it’s targeted at
the same poor peasants who stood by you in time of need.

The Zimbabweans and other foreign nationals were there helping to make
the African World Cup event a success,but I am truly astounded to hear
that the foreign African nationals are scampering for safety. The most
embarrassing situation is that the xenophobia is being targeted against
African brothers and sisters.Where has the spirit of pan-Africanism gone to?

Africa has played a pivotal role to ensure that your independence became
a reality. When Mandela was released from prison we were all mad with
joy. I remember as a young man running with joy upon catching wind of
the news that South Africa was free. It was indeed a sigh of relief to
us because I had heard the ordeal they went through in the fight against
apartheid. Many ordinary citizens from countries like Mozambique,
Botswana and Zimbabwe were persecuted by the apartheid regime because of
you. However they never threw up the towel for your sake, they
persevered for the sake of Africa. Is this how you are going to repay
the same ordinary people who suffered for you? Do not mock God, every
creature must submit to God and respect other people. As we speak more
than hundred African brothers and sisters have died at your hands, cold
blooded murder of innocent people. Why South Africa Why.

The South African government though I have always respected President
Zuma for his mediation efforts in Zimbabwe has played a willing
accomplice in this ruthless, criminal episode. I do not need a rocket
scientist to know that such a horrendous activity of murder and
butchering of innocent Africans can take place in their back yard and
they will not apprehend any culprit. In 2008 African brothers were
roasted alive with tires and ,funny enough, no significant arrests were
made. Xenophobia has reared its ugly head again, and now the
perpetrators are super charged because they got away with it. It is very
clear that the leadership of the country is trying to hide behind a
finger, but God will judge your nation harshly if you do not repent from
the terror you have subjected your neighbors to . I think what is left
is a SADC and AU resolve to let South Africa to play alone because it
does not play well with neighbors. I know the South African government
sympathizes with the victims during the day and celebrate at night, but
let it be known to you that what goes around comes around and history
shall make you to account for your actions

I appeal to human rights organizations to begin legal action against the
South African government on behalf of the victims. These victims should
be compensated for shock, torture and death and the hands of their
citizens. Some children are now street kids and orphans because of this
violence, some people have been displaced while others have their future
put in limbo after their meager but hard earned acquired property was
set ablaze with these heartless African citizens (South Africans).The
actions of our South African brothers have created destitutes and some
of the children are now orphans resulting in them dying in the streets
from poverty and starvation. I urge the human rights activists to stand
up and gather all the data about all the people who were massacred so
that the record can be clear to the rest of Africa. South Africans have
failed to appreciate that they do not leave in an Island.

Its indeed very painful to realize that some foreign nationals who
helped in making the world cup a success left the country fleeing for
dear life without being paid for their hard work because of fear .Most
South African employers took advantage and delayed to pay these foreign
nationals so that they would flee leaving their money behind. Worse
still some South Africans have looted the property of foreign nationals
which took them a lifetime to acquire. How painful is that, being
injured by your own brother.

Civil society should come in urgently to help these hapless people who
are struggling to put food on their table. If the government wanted to
stamp this xenophobia out it would not take time. Sadly, it seems to be
silently approving this callous and satanic act. South Africa should
stand and unequivocally tell the continent about its position; about
whether or not it is is part of us. We are not ready to force them to be
part us; we have played our role of emancipating them.

Simbarashe Chirimubwe is the leader of Concerned Africans Association
(CAA) and Global Zimbabwe Forum Coordinator for Africa.



Cops say reports of attacks are just rumours
Francis Hweshe Sowetan 15 July 2010

DESPITE reports of looting of foreign-owned shops, the displacement and
mass fleeing of refugees in several Cape Town townships, police have
denied this is linked to xenophobia.

Provincial police chief Lieutenant-General Mzwandile Petros said the
media was responsible for creating the xenophobia rumours, resulting in
refugees fleeing their communities.

President Jacob Zuma was quoted yesterday as saying reports of impending
xenophobic attacks remained rumours.

Petros said the suspects who were arrested for looting several Somali-
owned shops at Khayelitsha had not intimidated the owners, but broke
into abandoned shops.

He said Zimbabweans were leaving the Boland region because there was no
more work for them, as the seasonal farming cycle had ended.

Petros said for the last three months the police had investigated the
rumours and there was no evidence that foreigners would be attacked.

He was speaking on Tuesday night at a provincial safety forum meeting –
a body formed after the 2008 xenophobic attacks – which he chairs.

The purpose of the forum was originally to exchange information on
xenophobia between the police and civic bodies.

Several civic organisations, including the Legal Resources Centre, the
Social Justice Coalition, Cosatu and the SA National Civics
Organisation, attended the meeting.

Some organisations want the forum to be an “omnibus” and to deal with
issues beyond information exchange.

Petros rejected that, saying the police would only focus on preventing
attacks, and urged the organisations to focus on mediation in communities.

Provincial head of disaster risk management Hildegard Fast said
government departments were ready to engage the organisations on ways to
prevent xenophobic attacks.



Scared foreigners flee from area
Corrinne Louw Sowetan 15 July 2010

READY TO ACT: Security has been tightened at Bottlebrush informal
settlement after foreigners deserted their shacks in fear of xenophobic
attacks. PHOTO: THULI DLAMINI

POLICE were out in full force yesterday at the Bottlebrush informal
settlement in Chatsworth, the scene of a violent xenophobic attacks at
the weekend.

One foreign national was hospitalised. Hundreds of foreigners are said
to have already fled the settlement after fears of violent attacks on
foreigners became a reality on the day the World Cup ended.

Although police have denied that the attacks on the foreigners were
related to xenophobia, many foreigners are taking no chances and have
left in droves.

Yesterday, hundreds of shacks that belonged to foreigners were deserted
and residents were adamant that they wanted the foreigners to return to
“their own countries”.

Thabo Moleko, a Bottlebrush resident, said two of his neighbours had
fled. “We are not sure if they are gone back to Zimbabwe. They might be
around Durban but they have moved from here,” he said.

Bottlebrush community leader Falakhe Mhlongo said tensions were running
high. “It’s going to get worse over the weekend when people start
drinking. That’s why we are trying to arrange for a meeting to get the
whole community together to try to educate them about xenophobia.”



Foreigners 'chased like dogs
Caryn Dolley 14 July 2010

Foreigners forced from informal settlements around the province are
still too scared to return to their homes because they fear being
attacked again.

"I'm not going back. I don't care if the police are there. I am scared.
They've torn down my shop and my brothers who have gone back were
threatened again. We will wait - maybe until next week," Abduragman
Alikar, a Somali who ran a shop in Khayelitsha, said on Tuesday.

On Sunday and Monday scores of foreigners left a number of informal
settlements around the province after being threatened. Some had had
their shops looted.

Late on Monday in Nyanga fears of attacks against foreigners were
further fuelled when the body of a 33-year-old Malawian, Peter Chavura,
was discovered.

He had been murdered and his genitals cut off.

Nyanga police station spokeswoman Ntomboxolo Sitshitshi said the murder
was not xenophobia-related.

She said Chavura had been drinking with his friends on Sunday at a
shebeen in Samora Machel.

That was where his girlfriend last saw him but on Monday a resident told
her his body had been discovered in bushes in the area.

Pictures of the scene show his genitals on grass near his body.

In another section of Nyanga late on Monday another Malawian man, who
did not want to be named for fear of reprisal, said he was kicked out
his house after locals stoned it, then broke down the front door, before
chasing him and his family out.

The Malawian said five of his friends had also been chased out the area.
His employer, who did not want to be named for fear of jeopardising him,
said the man was now no longer at his home and was staying with friends.

On Tuesday in Nyanga, foreign-owned shops were
either empty or locked up.

Franschhoek police station spokeswoman Marize Papier said all the
foreign-owned shops in the area were also closed on Tuesday following a
day of looting.

She said 53 foreigners were staying in a church there and would possibly
go back home within the next few days.

In Grabouw, resident Rochelle Wegner also said a number of Somali- and
Nigerian-owned shops had been looted and a number of foreigners had left
the area.

Along the N1 on Tuesday near the Huguenot Tunnel, more than 20
Zimbabweans were waiting, trying to get transport out the province.

They had been at the roadside since the weekend
when many had been kicked out of informal settlements.

"It's the xenophobia that's forcing us away. I?m afraid, my friend. We
came here on Sunday after they chased us out of Mbekweni (in Paarl).

"The people from there chased us like dogs.

"There's no work or food in Zimbabwe and I provide for my family from here.

"But I must go where it's safe," said a woman, who wanted to be
identified only as "Sarah" because she feared reprisals.

On Monday, Police Minister Nathi Mthethwa visited the Western Cape to
assess xenophobic attacks.

The minister said criminals were behind the incidents.

# caryn.dolley@inl.co.za


* This article was originally published on page 1 of Cape Times on July
14, 2010



Zimbabweans Flee as Xenophobic Attacks Break-Out
Tichaona Sibanda 14 July 2010

Many Zimbabweans living in Gauteng province in South Africa have fled
their homes in the last 48 hours as sporadic incidents of violence have
broken out since Monday.

In and around areas surrounding Johannesburg it's alleged that gangs are
moving door to door robbing terrified foreigners of household goods like
televisions and refrigerators, and of cash.

Ezra 'Tshisa' Sibanda, Zimbabwe's popular radio DJ told us from
Johannesburg on Wednesday that police were on high alert in areas where
Zimbabweans and other foreigners are being targeted.

'The situation here is bad. Despite the authorities denying an outbreak
of attacks on foreigners, it is happening right now in some areas in
Gauteng province. I have personally been to townships where South
Africans are toyi-toying and shouting obscenities towards foreigners and
telling them to go back to their countries,' Sibanda said.

He added; 'I've also met Zimbabweans who have told me some of their
goods have been stolen and in the process they've also been chased away
from their homes. The South Africans are moving door-to-door and once
they detect the house is occupied by a foreigner, they invade it, steal
household goods and simply walk away.'

Refugee aid groups recently warned of a wave of xenophobic attacks after
the World Cup. This led to hundreds of foreigners, many from Zimbabwe,
leaving South Africa last week. Sibanda said many foreign nationals fled
their homes after the World Cup final on Sunday, as sporadic incidents
of xenophobic violence broke out. Those who remained are facing
persistent threats of violence in some of the townships.

In 2008, 62 people died and 150 000 were displaced in a wave of
xenophobic attacks around the country. This time around South African
Minister Lindiwe Sisulu said the South African National Defence Force
would make resources available to help the police stop the criminals who
were threatening residents.

'Opportunistic criminals must know that we will deal with them harshly,
there is no way we will allow them to spread fear and crime, we are
working very hard to find them and prosecute them,' she said.

Police ministry spokesman Zweli Mnisi said criminals were using
xenophobia as an excuse to create 'anarchy and anxiety. He said any
criminality disguised as xenophobia will not be tolerated.



Xenophobia: The situation in Cape Town
SJC, EE and TAC 14 July 2010

SJC, EE and TAC says there were anti-immigrant motives behind recent attacks

Government Must Acknowledge & Address Xenophobia in Cape Town

In 2008 xenophobic violence swept across South Africa, leaving 62 people
dead and more than 100 000 people displaced. The State's reaction was
beleaguered by a slow humanitarian response, a lack of information
regarding incidents on the ground, and failures to adequately prepare
for and deal with mass-displacement; all exacerbated by infighting
between the various spheres of government.

Xenophobic sentiment, harassment and violence has persisted, albeit in a
more sporadic and less organized manner. The biggest crisis in the
Western Cape to happen since took place in November 2009 when
approximately 2500 immigrants (largely Zimbabweans) were displaced in De
Doorns. Since 2008, we have received regular reports of isolated
intimidation and destruction of property affecting foreign nationals in
areas across Khayelitsha. More recently, rumours have circulated
claiming that immigrants would be attacked once the Football World Cup
came to a close. The origins of these rumours are uncertain, but it is
clear that they are not baseless, as we will illustrate below. The
argument that they are self-fulfilling comes as little consolation to
the thousands of immigrants around Cape Town and their South African
friend's and neighbours' who are now living in fear.

After an incident in Makhaza in which at least three Somali owned stores
were attacked immediately following South Africa's dismissal from the
World Cup last month; The Social Justice Coalition (SJC), Treatment
Action Campaign (TAC) and Equal Education and (EE) decided to run
workshops with staff and members to discuss xenophobia and how it could
be combated. We have been engaging with broader civil society networks
and forums, but our joint work has been limited to Khayelitsha, an area
badly affected by violence in 2008 and an area in which we have existing
grassroots networks which enable us to effectively reach the wider
community. During this work it was found that fear of attacks after the
World Cup was indeed very prevalent (amongst both locals and
immigrants), and that many immigrants were being directly and indirectly
threatened and intimidated.

In addition to trying to prevent violence by encouraging communities to
stand against xenophobia, we have been using our networks to monitor
xenophobic activity in the community. Regular reports of widespread
xenophobic criminal activity began reaching us on Sunday evening. Since
then, we have learnt of at least 15 incidents in Khayelitsha, all of
which have been reported to Khayelitsha Police and the Disaster
Management Centre. The majority of the incidents entailed the looting of
Somali-owned shops by roving gangs ranging from 10 to 30 individuals.
This happened in a variety of locations across Khayelitsha, including
Kuyasa, R and L Sections, TR, TQ & QQ Sections, M, BM & V Sections,
Makhaza 33 Section and SST Section in Town 2. Intimidation - and attacks
on the property - of Zimbabwean and Malawian citizens was also reported.
In most cases the owners of the shops targeted pre-emptively responded
to threats by vacating their homes and premises before the attacks
occurred. On Tuesday, almost all Somali owned stores were found to be
abandoned.

As mentioned, our activities have been largely restricted to
Khayelitsha. There have however also been reports of attacks on
foreign-owned shops in Wallacedene, Du Noon, Ocean View, Nyanga and
Philipi. There has been significant displacement in Cape Town, with
nearly 1000 displaced Somalis allegedly looking for sanctuary in
Belville after fleeing their homes. This pattern seems to have also
extended across the Western Cape, with incidents reported in Grabouw,
Klapmuts, Delft, Wellington and Mbekweni. In Mbekweni the attacks were
apparently especially serious, and resulted in injury to a small number
of foreign nationals and police officers. Daniella Ebenezer -
spokesperson for provincial disaster management - said 70 immigrants had
sought refuge on Sunday night at the Mbekweni police station and 22 at
Wellington SAPS.

The Police have in general responded quickly and effectively under
difficult conditions to violence in Khayelitsha which has contributed in
part to the relative calm Khayelitsha since Tuesday.

We are however most distressed by Government's failure to acknowledge
the xenophobic nature of recent attacks and by extension address the
fear felt by countless immigrants who have been threatened or directly
affected.

On 9 July Minister of Police and Convenor of the Inter-ministerial
Committee on Xenophobia Nathi Mthethwa spoke at a Xenophobia Summit in
Khayelitsha in which he cautioned "that this alarmist phobia by those
who fuel these rumours is intended to divert attention of the world from
our success and celebratory mood". On Monday - while attacks were
underway - President Jacob Zuma noted that he was "not certain whether
there have been threats of xenophobia ... there have been rumours that
have been reported".

In our view, it appears that senior police and the intelligence services
have failed to properly brief President Zuma and the cabinet. Many
senior officials appear reluctant to use the term "xenophobia" in the
hope that this will result in violence subsiding.

We call on Local, Provincial and National Government to immediately
recognize that individuals around Cape Town and the Western Cape are
being targeted based on their nationality. We especially call on
President Zuma to lead and support efforts to prevent attacks on
stateless people from other African countries. At this time it is
inconsequential to question whether the original rumours were devious or
based on an illegitimate threat, or whether these acts are being
perpetrated out of hate or a desire to opportunistically commit criminal
acts. None of this detracts from the fact that a specific group of
people is being targeted, and are very much in need of particular
protection. The abundance of reports of threats and intimidation, and
violent destruction of property belonging to foreign nationals compels
Government to recognize this, and plan and act accordingly.

The overwhelming majority of people in our communities want safety and
security for all and have no desire to harm people from other countries.
The World Cup demonstrated several very important facts - government
provided leadership and resources, our people responded
enthusiastically, crime was curbed, South Africans supported all our
African teams and visitors. We must use this unity of purpose to address
safety and security for all people irrespective of gender, sexual
orientation, class or nationality.

Joint statement issued by Social Justice Coalition, Equal Education and
the Treatment Action Campaign, July 14 2010



NGOs call on Zuma to recognise xenophobia
Sapa 14 July 2010

Officials seemed to be avoiding use of the word xenophobia in the hope
that the violence in the Western Cape would subside, three
non-governmental organisations (NGOs) charged.

Zimbabweans carry their belongings to the community hall. Xenophobia
broke out in De Doorns

quote "Many senior officials appear reluctant to use the term
'xenophobia' in the hope that this will result in violence subsiding quote

"We call on local, provincial and national government to immediately
recognise that individuals around Cape Town and the Western Cape are
being targeted based on their nationality," they said in a statement.

The NGOs - the Social Justice Coalition, Equal Education and the
Treatment Action Campaign - said they had learned of at least 15
incidents of "xenophobic criminal activity" in Khayelitsha alone since
Sunday.

Most entailed looting of Somali-owned shops by roving gangs ranging from
ten to 30 individuals.

A string of other incidents and threats had been reported from
surrounding areas and towns.

They said Police Minister Nathi Mthethwa had criticised what he called
"this alarmist phobia", while President Jacob Zuma had said he was "not
certain whether there have been threats of xenophobia".

"It appears that senior police and the intelligence services have failed
to properly brief president Zuma and the Cabinet," the NGOs said.

"Many senior officials appear reluctant to use the term 'xenophobia' in
the hope that this will result in violence subsiding."

They called on Zuma to lead and support efforts to prevent attacks on
people from other African countries.

They said it was inconsequential to question whether the acts were being
perpetrated out of hate or a desire to opportunistically commit criminal
acts.

"None of this detracts from the fact that a specific group of people is
being targeted, and are very much in need of particular protection."



ANC fiddles while xenophobic sentiment swirls
Jacob Dlamini Business Day 15 July 2010

THE first time I heard about plans to expel foreigners from SA after the
World Cup was in December last year. I was conducting research on an
African National Congress (ANC) branch in Katlehong at the time, and the
person who alerted me to the plans was a branch member. He said
residents, including ANC members, were talking openly about a plot to
send foreigners packing.

The talk was not limited to any section of the community. It involved
both young and old, men and women. The branch executive was informed
about the talk and, because it was just talk, members were advised to
keep tabs on it, to see who was doing the talking and to find out why.

The anti-immigrant talk seemed to die out in the build-up to the World
Cup. I was away from SA from January to May and did not pay the matter
any mind, believing it to be under control. Local ANC activists had,
after all, helped spare Katlehong the worst excesses of the May 2008
xenophobic pogroms.

However, my complacency was disturbed one weekend shortly after my
return in May by a report in the Mail & Guardian saying that SA’s
security agencies were investigating rumours of plans for anti-immigrant
pogroms after the World Cup.

That same weekend, I had a chance encounter with a researcher from Wits
University’s Southern African Migration Project. She confirmed the Mail
& Guardian story and said her outfit was also looking into the rumours.
Then followed casual encounters with neighbours and strangers who said,
quite openly, that come July 12, foreigners must return to wherever they
come from.

Once, while hanging out at a traders’ market on the border of Katlehong
and Vosloorus, I overheard a group of local women taunting a Mozambican
man, telling him to go home.

The women were in good spirits and the man, who seemed to know them,
shot back that many local women would starve if Mozambican men were to
return to their home country. But there was no escaping the menace
buried deep in the exchange.

When I told relatives who acted and sounded as if they were part of the
anti- immigrant plots that they risked arrest, they said not to worry.
The police were in on the plots. They said the police were just as “fed
up” with the Shangaans, which is the omnibus term for a foreigner in
Katlehong, regardless of whether a foreigner speaks Shangaan or not. I
was not surprised. I had heard policemen express some of the worst
xenophobia imaginable.

A couple of weeks ago a friend, the same ANC member who first warned me
about the anti-Shangaan plots in December 2009, called to say he and
comrades from his branch had just interviewed a group of youths in
southern Katlehong who claimed to have been stockpiling weapons for the
pogroms.

“This thing is serious,” I recall my friend saying. He said the boys
seemed determined. My friend, who is also a ward councillor, is
connected to the local ANC councillor and the police, and I assume the
police and the local political leaders know everything he knows.

Before my friend’s call, a Bangladeshi man who runs a spaza shop on our
street told a cousin that a stranger had recently visited the shop and
told the Bangladeshi man to make sure he was gone by the end of the
World Cup. The Bangladeshi approached my cousin because my cousin was a
community activist and, like him, Muslim. He was scared.

So far, rumours of anti-immigrant pogroms have been just that, rumours.

However, rumours do not stop being important or dangerous simply because
they are rumours. People act on rumours. Individuals base their politics
and beliefs on rumours. That is why the media should not shy away from
reporting on the rumours.

We should not pretend that people on our streets are not making
dangerous noises simply because no one seems to have acted on those
noises yet.

It is not to embarrass SA and Police Minister Nathi Mthethwa to say that
we are sitting on a time bomb that could be ignited easily by something
as “flimsy” as a rumour. SA has already been embarrassed once before and
it would not do to circle the wagons, as the ANC seems to be doing, and
to pretend that there is no problem.

The ANC branch I studied last year is in panic mode. Activists are
worried about young people amassing arms, old people saying things that
legitimate xenophobia and a police force that cannot be trusted.

It would be interesting to learn when last Mthethwa attended a meeting
of his ANC branch. It is possible that he would not know an ANC branch
meeting even if it met in his ministerial house. But it might do him
some good to go to a branch meeting to hear what members are hearing and
saying about the power of rumours.

What is that slogan favoured by the ANC: Each one teach one?

- Dlamini is author of Native Nostalgia (Jacana 2009).



No time for denialism:Those who heard the dog bark remember its bite, write Loren B Landau and
Tara Polzer

Loren B Landau and Tara Polzer 14 July 2010

The Big Read: For the past three months, civil society organisations,
academics and even some government officials have been warning that
xenophobic attacks are coming soon after the World Cup has ended.

TIME BOMB: By shifting the blame for violence to purportedly
'unpatriotic' or 'Afro-pessimist' (read 'racist') individuals, media
outlets, and institutions that speak openly about the violence, the
police minister is taking aim at the messengers, not the perpetrators
Picture: ALON SKUY

Over the past two weeks, those same people have seen World Cup fever
give way to a feverish effort to prevent the forthcoming melee.

No one has been readying themselves more fervently than migrants, many
of whom have made their way to safety either in South Africa or beyond
its borders. Some, who heard the dog barking and, remembering the brutal
attacks of May 2008, fear its mortal bite.

Following last week's meeting of the inter-ministerial committee
dedicated to addressing the expected attacks, senior government
officials have developed a co-ordinated, if somewhat ambivalent,
approach to the relapse into xenophobic violence.

Along with the firm (if fallacious) statements that South Africa is not
a banana republic, where people can murder with impunity, officials have
been denying that the threats should be taken seriously.

Only this week, newspapers quoted President Jacob Zuma's response: "I'm
not certain whether there have been threats of xenophobia. I know that
there have been rumours that have been reported."

As of now, he continued, there was no "concrete evidence" of attacks.
The hundreds of Zimbabweans and others who are fleeing hostile
communities are, if we are to believe what officials tell us, simply
seasonal farm workers returning home.

The minister and the deputy minister of police, and others, have accused
"prophets of doom" and "Afro-pessimists" of trying to rob South Africa
and, presumably, the ANC, of its World Cup glory by talking about
xenophobia.

But the words of senior politicians do have significant impact. Stating
that the attacks are "mere rumours" or "mere crime" is worrying. Most
obviously, it reveals government leaders who are either out of touch
with their own intelligence and police services, or are willing to
publicly prevaricate about threats to the country's residents.

Police and intelligence services have been warning of rising tension and
the seriousness of threats since early in the year, well before any
public or media discussions, which are now accused of "creating" or
"fuelling" violence.

At what point do distributing threatening pamphlets, regular verbal
threats in communities, and community meetings in which people outline
their plans to get rid of foreigners constitute more than a rumour?

But, whatever the reasons for their response, all South African
residents will be the losers.

What we have seen over the past few weeks is not only a government
unwilling to acknowledge the threat of xenophobic violence, but an
administration that seeks to deny others the possibility of raising the
warning flag.

Moreover, by denying xenophobia as a motivation, the inter-ministerial
committee does not acknowledge, and cannot explain, why specific groups
are targeted. Labelling an attack xenophobically motivated does not mean
that all South Africans are consumed by bigotry and hatred.

But some people regularly single out specific groups for abuse,
explicitly couching their threats in discriminatory language. If shouts
of "You Makwerekwere, get out" are, indeed, "disguising" alternative
motivations, as Minister of Police Nathi Mthethwa suggests, local
political and business interests are playing on existing sentiments and
anger. These attacks might be criminal, but they ignore the tools -
hatred, bigotry, and a willingness to turn to violence - that enable them.

By shifting the blame for violence to purportedly "unpatriotic" or
"Afro-pessimist" (read "racist") individuals, media outlets, and
institutions that speak openly about the violence, Mthethwa is taking
aim at the messengers, not the perpetrators. This is a dangerous trend
for a democratic country that is, at least formally, committed to open
and public debate.

If we are lucky enough to avoid the conflagrations that caught hold in
2008, let us not forget that the dog has already bitten. Only this week,
a Ghanaian was shot down in the streets of Khayelitsha, flying straight
in the face of the heart-warming pan-African solidarity mustered during
the World Cup.

A few days earlier, passengers shouting insults against foreigners threw
a Zimbabwean out of a moving train.

How is that "opportunistic crime"? Moreover, hundreds if not thousands
of people have fled their homes in Western Cape, KwaZulu-Natal and
Gauteng out of fear. As much as the government deserves to bask in its
World Cup victory, the international and continental media are already
taking notice.

Which is worse for the country: violence and fear, or a government ready
to deny that ethnic cleansing is being attempted on its watch? Denying
that ethnic, national and other divisions exist will not help us in our
search for unity.

The lives and livelihoods of foreigners and other outsiders are now at
risk. This should alarm us. What should worry us more are threats to
political credibility and a society in which elected officials heed
warnings, accurately identify and diagnose problems and treat the
population - regardless of origin - with respect and provide them with
the security they deserve.

* Landau and Polzer are researchers in the Forced Migration Studies
Programme, at the University of the Witwatersrand



I am a foreigner - to hatred: Show a 'makwerekwere' that SA is where the heart is
Jonathan Jansen 14 July 2010

Jonathan Jansen: When I read with horror that scores of Zimbabwean
refugees were camping along the N1 highway to flee the Rainbow Nation,
in response to threats of what would happen to them once the World Cup
ended, I again found myself drawing on that profound source of
intellectual inspiration, the animated film Finding Nemo.

quote There is a dark side to such passionate love of country: it
excludes quote

As Marlin (Nemo's father) drifts off by himself, despondent that he
cannot find his son, Dory (the fish with Alzheimer's, as one youngster
put it) begs him over and over again not to leave. Then Dory makes a
telling observation about their relationship that I will never forget:
his final plea to Marlin comes with the words: "I look at you, and I'm
home."

How I wish a South African resident could look a Malawian refugee in the
face, and the two say to each other, "I look at you, and I'm home."

Dory's words speak of home not as a literal place or a strip of land but
as a heart relationship between human beings.

Anyone who has lost a mother will know what I mean; going home just
isn't the same after your mother has died. Because home was not the
house; it was that bond of love between mother and children.

A brilliant movie maker, Molly Blank, renders a powerful account about
xenophobia in her new documentary, Where Do I Stand?. She tells the
story of the 2008 attacks on foreigners in which 62 people died; the
story is told through the voices of five South African youngsters. Some
of them were involved in the looting and attacks.

As they reflect on their criminal deeds, the young people come to
understand that those they harmed were human beings, with the same
fears, anxieties and aspirations that they have.

Then something profound happens: the attackers begin to repair the
damage. They make public statements of regret, but then they also take
their business back to the Somalian shopkeepers, walking past the shops
of native vendors to make the point. Other young people in the
documentary find ways of caring for their brothers and sisters in
different ways. One student hides a makwerekwere (a derogatory word for
foreigners) in his sparse home.

The young people take a stand. And slowly but surely, black and white,
they begin to share their homes and their lives with those living
between two desperate worlds: their home countries and this refugee nation.

What happens, clearly, is that the moment of human recognition dawns on
these young South Africans: "I see you, and I'm home".

We South Africans need to look in the mirror after this World Cup and
ask ourselves an uncomfortable question: Why do we celebrate Ghanaians
and other Africans on the soccer pitch but persecute them in the townships?

I saw rich and poor natives of our land weep when Luis "Hand of God"
Suarez robbed Ghana of a sure goal en route to the World Cup
semi-finals. I see no such solidarity of emotion as the bloody hands of
natives shove threatening letters under the shack doors of our
neighbours from the region. What kind of hypocrisy is this?

This was always my fear about the wave of nationalistic fever that
spread across the land during the World Cup; there is a dark side (if
you will forgive the pun) to such passionate love of country - it excludes.

Our pan-African solidarity is superficial; a cosmopolitan view of the
world is lacking. And for this we pay the price in blood.

Make no mistake, the people who are now pursuing foreigners will sooner
or later turn on the rest of us. There will always have to be a
scapegoat for misery, real or imagined. The people who kill foreigners
one day will quickly divide the rest of us into a "non" group (you
complete the "non-.").

I have had my fair share of people (some very well-educated) calling me
"non-" because they believe they are whiter or blacker than others of
us. Watch out for these killers.

I am about to buy and distribute T-shirts that carry the words "I AM A
FOREIGNER".

I am a foreigner to xenophobia, to race-hatred, to stereotyping, to the
physical and emotional abuse of our neighbours, to mindless patriotism.
I hope millions of South Africans will wear such T-shirts.

The foreigners are us, and we are them. Find a foreigner, grab him by
the shoulders and then say boldly: "I look at you, and I'm home."

* Molly Blank's DVD on healing and hope in the wake of xenophobia, with
teacher resources, can be obtained by visiting the website
www.wheredoIstandfilm.com



Xenophobia and denialism
Denialism no answer to xenophobia: Imraan Buccus

Imagine if, in 2009, an armed white mob chanting racist slogans stormed
a building known to house mostly black people and proceeded to hurl
people to their deaths.

If local officials and politicians tried to deny that the motive had
been racism and said that the mob was merely searching for criminals
their denialism would, correctly, be seen as appeasement. There would,
and rightly so, be massive national and international outrage as the
appeasement of barbarism.

In May 2008 foreign-born Africans were attacked in Umbilo and hounded
out of Cato Manor and Chatsworth. Local officials and politicians
responded with the denialism that has often cursed the ruling elite.
That denialism was, unquestionably, a form of appeasement. A social
pathology cannot be confronted if it is not clearly named.

The obfuscation around the realities of the xenophobic attacks in Durban
in May last year has allowed the disease of xenophobia to fester. Now it
has returned in the most horrific way. And once again, the brutal
reality that blatant and murderous xenophobia stains our city has been
masked by denialism on the part of some local politicians and officials.

Every time a ward councillor or police officer says that the horrific
recent attack on the refugee shelter in
Broad Street

was just an attack on criminals they are guilty of appeasement. The
inexcusable cannot be excused.

But naming xenophobia for what it is will not be enough. We also need to
understand how and why this disease festers in our society. Most of the
responses to the many pogroms have manifestly failed in this regard.
Indeed elite commentators often responded with the “analysis” that it
was just an attack on the poor that revealed their expertise to amount
to little more than typical middle-class prejudice towards the poor.

The reality is that xenophobia runs through all levels of our society
and that, from the beginning of the democratic era, there have been huge
levels of xenophobia in our society. It is also true that when the May
pogroms happened some of the most effective and committed opposition,
especially here in Durban, came from poor communities.

Xenophobia is not a disease of the poor – it is a disease of South
Africa. There are rich xenophobes and poor xenophobes, xenophobes in
mobs on the street and xenophobes working for the police or the
Department of Homes Affairs.

An important attempt to theorise xenophobia in South Africa comes in the
form of an excellent book by Michael Neocosmos, a respected political
theorist. It was published in 2006 and is titled ‘Foreign Natives’ to
‘Native Foreigners’: Explaining Xenophobia in Post-Apartheid South
Africa. Neocosmos gives a detailed history of how apartheid denied South
African citizenship to Africans and attempted, via the Bantustan system,
to turn African South Africans into foreigners in their own country. He
also shows that the apartheid denial of citizenship to Africans was
vigorously challenged by popular and democratic ideas of citizenship.

Neocosmos argues that radicalisation and democratisation of the popular
resistance to apartheid in the late 1980s created a new and democratic
conception of the nation based on the idea that South Africa belongs to
all who live in it. This was a non-racial vision, which was also not
narrowly nationalist in that it included migrant workers and others not
born in South Africa. But Neocosmos argues that when the ANC was
unbanned and popular democratic politics demobilised and subordinated to
top down party structures there was a return to the exclusive power of
the state to decide who is a citizen and who is not. Ordinary people,
once agents of their own politics, were reduced to political passivity.

For Neocosmos the ruling elite “is unable to think beyond the confines
of exclusion and control … Popular organisational and militant
democratic struggles are no longer within its ambit of thought.” Once
the state had regained the right to determine citizenship the
post-apartheid state immediately began treating migrants in the most
appalling ways and, also, used xenophobic discourse in the most reckless
ways. Neocosmos shows that while politicians often spoke as if the
phrase “illegal immigrant” meant the same thing as the word “criminal”,
the fact is that 98% of people arrested on criminal charges in our
country are citizens of our country.

If we take Neocosmos seriously it also becomes clear that, while NGOs
have done a good job of documenting state and popular xenophobia, they
have failed to take it on and will continue to be unable to directly
confront it. This is because, while NGOs are very good at constructing
people as victims and raising awareness about suffering, they have no
power to confront oppression on their own. All they can do is to make
appeals to the state but they have no way to force their agenda on the
state.

If there is to be a real challenge to xenophobia it will come from a
return to the popular modes of bottom up democratic politics that
challenged the apartheid state in the Seventies and the Eighties. When
these kinds of politics build solidarity between people who work the
same jobs, live in the same places and so on, irrespective of race or
country of origin, and when they do this outside of the logic of party
politics which, with its emphasis on state conceptions of citizenship is
inherently xenophobic, they can build an organic and powerful opposition
to state and popular xenophobia.

But the great tragedy of the last few years is that the state has
largely sought to repress the return to popular democratic politics. And
NGOs have responded to the return to a bottom up grassroots politics
organised outside of the logic of state conceptions of citizenship with
similar anxiety.

If we are serious about defeating this cancer in our society we’ll have
to acknowledge the importance of popular democratic politics organised
outside of the narrow logic of party politics. We’ll have to return to a
politics of popular solidarity.



Xenophobia is just rumours, like the girl without bloomers
johnvscott@mweb.co.za 14 July 2010

OUR Minister of Police, Nathi Mthethwa, is, if he doesn't mind my saying
so, a bit like that young woman in the musical Oklahoma who sings "them
stories 'bout the way I lost my bloomers - rumours!".

To Mthethwa, them stories about xenophobia are just rumours.

And not just rumours. Also "hysteria" and "alarmist phobia", spread by
"irresponsible reporting", "sinister forces" and the "prophets of doom".

Well, there you have it in a nutshell. In fact the fear of all the
fleeing Somalis, Zimbabweans, Malawians and other foreign Africans is
the same as the young man's mistaken belief that his girl had a habit of
dropping her knickers - just a figment of their imagination.

The important thing to realise is that you can't accuse everyone who
burns down foreign-owned shops and loots their contents of being a
xenophobe. They could be ordinary criminals practising xenophobia in the
hope that their actions might be excused. On the other hand, it is only
fair that residents who help to burn and loot shops are not classed as
ordinary criminals, but as bona fide xenophobes who are just gatvol of
foreigners.

Sometimes journalists are too stupid to spot the difference between a
rampaging resident and a criminal in heavy, xenophobic disguise.

Defence Minister Lindiwe Sisulu has complicated the issue by announcing
that "opportunistic criminals" would be dealt with harshly. This had led
to the belief that not only will genuine xenophobes get off more
lightly, but so will ordinary criminals who have refrained from being
too opportunistic.

So it came as a surprise to residents of one of the townships when the
police shot at them with rubber bullets, to stop them stoning Somalis.
They didn't realise that had they been opportunistic criminals, the
police would have used live ammunition.

There is also confusion about why foreign Africans are grabbing what
possessions they have and queuing up at roadsides to leave the country
or seeking protection at police stations. The general impression is that
they are terrified of being attacked and possibly killed. But Minister
Mthethwa has another theory. He says they are merely "seasonal workers"
keen to return home.

Foreigners who have been legally living and working here for many years
never knew they were seasonal. Nor did they know they were keen to
return home, until threatened with death if they didn't. Trust our
minister to keep them informed.

It is not only the media and the prophets of doom who have been
spreading rumours. Western Cape Cosatu leader Tony Ehrenreich says South
Africa is sitting on a "xenophobic power-keg", and that the National
Intelligence Agency failed to recognise this. But who needs intelligence
when the minister himself knows for a fact that reports of xenophobia
are simply a "whispering campaign" to discredit the country after the
World Cup?

Talking of which, Cosatu has also suggested that Athlone Stadium,
upgraded to the tune of hundreds of millions and used only twice for
practice, by the Uruguays, be deployed as a temporary refuge for alleged
victims of xenophobia.

It would help to prove that accusations of unnecessary expenditure were
nothing but a rumour.
johnvscott@mweb.co.za



Dire poverty is the root cause of xenophobic attacks
Azayo 14 July 2010

Xenophobic attacks are a direct reflection of the state of poverty in
the country.

We should be concerned about the widespread attacks on so-called
foreigners in the Western Cape.

These can be blamed on several factors including the ANC-led government.

Much as we condemn, in the strongest possible terms, these attacks
perpetrated against so-called foreigners, we also condemn the government
for its failure to take decisive measures since the outbreak of violence
in May 2008, and also for ignoring reports that xenophobic attacks would
begin anew after the World Cup.

Recently, ANC chairwoman Baleka Mbete reportedly described the fears as
baseless and unfounded; a week ago, the Deputy Minister of Home Affairs,
Malusi Gigaba, denied reports that scores of refugees, many from
Zimbabwe, were scuttling from Cape Town for fear of being attacked.

A spokesperson for Tygerberg Hospital said six people, believed to be
victims of xenophobic violence, had been admitted this week.

The Black Consciousness Movement has been vigorously advocating the idea
of a united Africa, but we also believe that it would be a recipe for
anarchy to allow anyone who is African (or any other nationality) to set
up home in South Africa without due protocol.

Any self-respecting country that promotes the rule of law will ensure
that those who migrate across its borders have met the legal
qualifications to reside in its country. It is only in South Africa
where the government does not seem to realise the need to control the
movement of migrants.

South Africans were also, at some point in time, afforded sanctuary in
other African countries.

But their status had to be legally defined before they could be
integrated into local communities. Failure to follow the orderly and
legal route is a recipe for disaster - as the unfortunate xenophobic
attacks proved.

It is for this reason, among others, that we call upon the South African
government and the Department of Home Affairs in particular to get its
act together on the issue of people who apply for asylum in this country.

Failure to act in an orderly manner will lead to violence. Let me also
point out that the reason for these attacks is not purely xenophobia,
but rather competition for resources.

The South African population does not have access to enough basic
resources to live a dignified existence.

So the poorest of the poor, in desperation, vent their frustration on
the nearest, most vulnerable target - foreigners without the social and
legal support structures to protect them.

They loot these foreigners' shops and homes as part of this fight for
resources.

The attacks are a direct reflection of the state of poverty in the country.

Extreme poverty sows disunity, and it is not surprising that things have
turned out this way.

The ruling party, with its majority vote in the National Assembly, has
failed to deliver basic necessities like clean water, decent jobs,
health care and shelter to the poor, almost 16 years after democracy.

It's unfortunate that the perpetrators of these violent acts are
directing their anger at the wrong people (so-called foreigners),
instead of targeting the ruling party.

For it is the ANC that caters to the rich elite at the expense of the
poor majority.

The ruling party has become a reactionary party and a stumbling block to
the ultimate demise of capitalism and ushering in of a socialist republic.

Thole Somdaka
Azayo National Spokesperson



Cops' hands tied on xeno pamphlet
Hlengiwe Mnguni, News24 14 July 2010

Cape Town - Western Cape police say they can do nothing about a
xenophobic pamphlet handed out in the province, rallying a community to
"fight for what belongs to us" on a specified date - as its source of
origin is unknown.

"It needs to be a threat from one person to another. We don't know where
it comes from," spokesperson Colonel Billy Jones told News24.

The pamphlet reads: "Things are getting tough here in South Africa, so I
appeal to every residents (sic) ... to join hands together to drive
foreigners out of our country.

"Truth is our government is no longer able to take care of us," it
continues before specifying the date on which “dolls will dance”.

Jones said it could be part of a rumour about xenophobia which
government has blamed for the recent incidents in which the shops of
mostly Somalis were looted and burned in townships around Cape Town.

He said the police and army would continue being highly visible in areas
considered vulnerable in the province.

No incidents of xenophobic violence were reported on Wednesday, Jones said.

He urged people to report threats of xenophobic violence to their
nearest police station.
- News24



Xenophobic Pamphlet Doing the Rounds in Cape Town
Newstime 14 July 2010

Western Cape police say they are clueless as to the origin of a pamphlet
which urges residents to take up arms against foreigners in their community.

The pamphlet says “Things are getting tough here in South Africa, so I
appeal to every residents (sic) ... to join hands together to drive
foreigners out of our country. Truth is our government is no longer able
to take care of us”. There have been myriad reports of looming
xenophobic violence in Cape Town but only one incident has occurred so
far and the police were swift to put a lid on matters and arrest those
responsible.

Col Billy Jones of the SAPS said the police cannot yet act on the
pamphlet as “It needs to be a threat from one person to another. We
don't know where it comes from”. Police and army personnel are on high
alert in and around the Cape Peninsula.



Premier's team to fight xeno violence
AMUKELANI CHAUKE 14 July 2010

Gauteng Premier Nomvula Mokonyane has set up a provincial team to deal
with threats of xenophobic attacks.

Briefing journalists at an executive council meeting yesterday,
Mokonyane said the team would act to prevent the rumoured attacks by
identifying past offenders.

"We have a political committee that includes disaster management,
community safety, traffic, local government, emergency services; there
is already a team," she said.

Mokonyane called for the police to re-open the case against the people
who set fire to Mozambican Ernesto Alfabeto Nhamuave during the 2008
attacks on foreigners.

"We also know the hot spots. One of the things we have asked the MEC for
community safety [Khabisi Mosukuntu] to deal with is what happened to
those people who burnt [Nhamuave]."

Mokonyane said justice must be done to deter people from xenophobic
violence.

"We have programmes. Community development workers and ward councillors
are heading community meetings. We have communities calling us and
saying they have heard people talking about xenophobic attacks, so we
are dealing with that," she said.

"All the [World Cup] operation centres of the police and courts have not
been dismantled; they are still operational and that on its own is
helping. That capacity is not lost .

". we don't actually believe that South Africans are xenophobic,"
Mokonyane said. "We see [the violence] as a pure act of criminality.

"We urge our people to learn from the World Cup that, indeed, we are one.

"In the spirit of Nelson Mandela . and us being Pan-Africanist, we can't
actually be attacking our own," she said.

The visible policing that had ensured a safe World Cup must continue,
she said.

"We can't be perfect for visitors and not good for ourselves."

* Mokonyane defended her administration's R4-million splurge on 4613
tickets for the soccer tournament, saying her executive council took "a
correct decision" when deciding to buy them.

The decision to purchase the tickets was based on the need for the
government to give deserving Gauteng residents who could not afford
tickets - such as pupils from poor schools, orphans and amateur football
teams - the opportunity to attend matches.

She said MECs were given tickets to host and network with the
government's "strategic partners", not for their families.



Criminals are behind xenophobia
Fikile Mbalula 14 July 2010

PROACTIVE: Deputy Police Minister Fikile Mbalula says the government has
placed security forces on high alert to deal with elements that seek to
perpetuate xenophobia. PHOTO: Alon Skuy

Fikile Mbalula

Tensions are mainly driven by thugs in areas where there is poverty and
unemployment

WE HAVE just solidified our presence within the global village by
successfully hosting the 2010 Fifa World Cup as a continent.

The unity displayed by all Africans in their large numbers blowing
vuvuzelas from the roof tops in celebration of Africa’s success is
immeasurable, and with this a big thank you .

Our march towards a democratic state that characterises the latter- day
South Africa is premised on our struggles that saw the international
community rally behind our cause.

We were exiled from our own land and had to seek refuge in foreign
lands. Our affinity with the rest of the African continent and the
broader democratic world is unmistakable and cannot be questioned.

The conceptualisation of the democratic South Africa was premised on the
appreciation that South Africa is an integral part of the broader
African community and the international family of nations.

South Africa’s founding values and principles are underpinned by a human
rights culture and principle of mutual coexistence.

The role that we continue to play in building a better Africa and a
better world, Darfur, Zimbabwe to the Sahrawi Republic, from Northern
Ireland to the Middle East is one steeped in the fundamental human
rights values that constitute the cornerstone of our democracy.

Within the young democracy we live in today we managed to showcase to
the world how beautiful the country is through hosting events such as
the soccer World Cup, rugby World Cup, the cricket World Cup, World
Summit on Sustainable Development, among others .

During the (soccer) World Cup, there was a sharp increase in anti-
foreigner sentiment spreading from metropolitan cities and surrounding
townships to smaller towns and rural areas across SA.

This has led to fears about xenophobic attacks on foreign nationals.

According to some of the findings by the government, the locus of these
tensions is mainly driven by criminal elements in areas where there are
high levels of poverty and unemployment.

There is also tension between businesses owned by locals and foreign
nationals, which spawned an ugly element of criminal involvement,
exploitation and manipulation of the situation.

The situation with its tensions between the businesses by foreigners and
locals has taken a shape of criminality. As it stands, the security
agencies have been in constant communications with various people within
communities who may identify the kingpins in this regard.

We are fully aware that in most cases these acts of criminality are led
by criminals and aided by and abetted by locals, particularly the young
people – who enjoy the looting and pillaging of foreigners’ businesses.

The criminals have understandably been using the xeno-attacks for armed
robberies.

Whatever the case may be, we are prepared for all these, through
deployment of our security agencies. We have through the Inter-
Ministerial Committee to ensure continued partnership with the organs of
civil society in proactively curbing and averting these threats, as
outlined in a multi- faceted and integrated plan:

# Proactive facilitation of a societal dialogue.

# Extension of the 2010 Fifa World Cup National Joint Committee, to have
a quicker investigation, tighter sentencing and law enforcement acting
swiftly, speedily and decisively against anyone found to incite violent
acts against foreign nationals.

# Strict monitoring of proliferation of businesses owned by foreign
nationals and lack of regulation thereof.

# Review and derive lessons from the May/June 2008 incidents.

# Reinforce civic education in society and within the law enforcement
agencies.

# Development of a government communications strategy, which will
aggressively counter and mitigate the risk posed by the unbalanced media
reports which instil fear about possible attacks.

These are just some of the ways and means to heighten our proactiveness
aggressively to provide a safer South Africa.

Central to this we need a strong partnership with the society, and we
must also stress that the role of the community policing forums is
critical in ensuring the above mentioned points are successful.

We have placed our security forces on high alert to deal with any
element within our communities that seek to perpetuate this heinous
crime of xenophobia, which manifests itself in violence and gross
intolerance.

Our promise to throw the book at those who seek to champion these acts
of criminality is no idle threat and our security forces remain ready to
use every tool at their disposal within the ambit of the law to protect
the lives and properties of every citizen and foreign national living in
South Africa.

South Africans should learn to understand the role played by African
countries in giving us refuge during the time of apartheid. The lessons
we should teach ourselves is during the unifying actions of sports we
managed to sing the same song.

We cannot celebrate Maria Mutola, Nwanku Kanu, Abedi Pele, Emperor Haile
Selassie, Patrice Lumumba, Julius Nyerere, yet hate their fellow
countrymen and women, our fellow African brothers and sisters.

South Africa will never be in the hands of the criminals, we will not
allow these dirty elements within our midst to dictate to us on how we
should live.

We are watching and arrests will be made soon. This has been our
commitment before the Fifa World Cup and we still stand by that.

The writer is Deputy Minister of Police



Welfare state gives rise to xenophobic violence
Meshack Mabogoane Business Day 14 July 2010

THE recent rumours about potential xenophobic violence after the World
Cup are a puzzling throwback to a third force that bedevilled the 1980s
at the height of opposition to apartheid. The evil has reared its head
and smacks, as before, of central levers at work. It also raises
questions about the role of security agencies and their part in
preventing crime and safeguarding law and order.

Fears of xenophobic attacks are totally unnecessary. The National
Intelligence Agency (NIA), police and army must handle delinquency and
serious threats to state security — whether they are suspicions, rumours
or reality. Any large-scale violence, including xenophobic violence, is
their business and they should pre-emptively and promptly deal with any
menace.

The head of the police service has already congratulated his troops for
victory during the Fifa tournament — much crime was anticipated before
the tournament, based on the influx of foreigners and internal experiences.

If the police succeeded at this task, surely they can repeat the feat by
pre- empting xenophobic crimes. Stories of potential xenophobic threats
follow previous attacks in 2008. While the fires from those attacks were
still hot, the state hastily gave explanations and solutions.

The African National Congress (ANC) made xenophobia a “moral” issue,
eschewing interpretations that it was based on material causes, such as
jobs and housing, which ignite poor and stressed communities anywhere.
No mention was made of the ethnic factor, as happens in conflicts, for
example, in Nigeria, in the Balkans, and in SA’s history — among native
blacks, white burgers and foreigners.

Most unusually, former President Thabo Mbeki interrupted his
globetrotting escapades to address the social issue. He held meetings
with victims — yet casualties of HIV/AIDS, whose existence and death
were denied, still got no attention. Practical results ensued quickly:
the speedy issuing of identity documents to foreigners — ready for
elections and readier for social grants and citizenship.

With Fifa gone, a huge propaganda vacuum exists which, naturally, must
be filled. So xenophobia presents a logical sequel to an international
spectacular. Now SA must show it “cares” for foreigners and, because of
“impending attacks”, strong official exhortations are made to welcome
and integrate them — regardless of deteriorating social, economic and
health facilities that are reeling under the weight of an exploding
population.

Again, the NIA is facing allegations of an inability to detect
xenophobic threats, outdone by ordinary people, including priests who
have questionably intervened on security issues affecting foreigners.

Absorbing millions of foreigners into a country that is still relatively
poor, and in which more people are increasingly dependent on state
grants for basic subsistence, is unpatriotic, dishonest and ridiculous.
These foreigners come from countries that squander their resources and
deliberately destroy economies — let alone develop them. A genuine
regional power would address this.

These issues are not moral but material. The ruling regime encourages
teenage girls, for example, to have children — for which the state pays
child grants of R100bn a year — and this is presented as “human rights”
and “welfare”.

Now millions of poor foreigners produce babies to receive child grants
too, and compete for jobs and houses — the universal causes of real
xenophobia. Such welfare programmes will stir real xenophobic attacks,
as some of these “human rights” have engendered social degeneration.

Many of SA’s far-reaching programmes are imposed by hook — and mainly by
crook. Lacking a strong opposition, and with a low-quality, servile and
nonrepresentative Parliament, vigilance is vital.

Otherwise such things are surreptitiously and speciously thrust down the
gullet of an unsuspecting society, at great material and human cost,
ultimately aggravating SA’s myriad problems.
shacks1956@yahoo.com
- Mabogoane is a freelance writer.



<>Xenophobia is pure criminality - SACP
SACP 13 July 2010

Party says the real enemy is the capitalist system that breeds
underdevelopment

SACP STATEMENT ON ACTS OF VIOLENCE DIRECTED AT FOREIGN NATIONALS

Our country has come to the conclusion of hosting a successful FIFA 2010
World Cup. During this month there has been many positive achievements
on the ground within our country. The South African government and the
people of SA have united, like never before, to host hundreds of
thousands of international guests from the African continent and other
parts of the world.

The key challenge now will be how to build on the momentum and
experience gained. At this stage, after this successful hosting of the
World Cup the SACP wishes to strongly condemn the threats and actual
acts of violence against foreign nationals. These are no ‘xenophobic'
attacks (undesirable as they are as well), but acts of criminality to
loot and destabilise our communities to provide cover for these
criminals. This criminal element is hell-bent on manipulating some of
the real problems and challenges facing our communities.

The enemy is not our brothers and sisters from the rest of the
continent, but the capitalist system that continues to breeds
underdevelopment.

We must build on the momentum garnered through the hosting of the World
Cup by focusing our collective energies on the challenges we all face as
a nation - jobs, transforming health-care and education, rural
development, and fighting the scourge of crime and corruption.

We call on our structures across the alliance and other progressive
organisations, including those in the opposition, to unite and mobilise
against these fringe criminal elements in our communities. Our
structures must equally take a lead in providing leadership in dealing
with genuine service delivery crises, fighting corruption and all other
obstacles to bettering the lives of our people.

We also call upon all our communities to work together with law
enforcement agencies in exposing and dealing with this criminality.

Statement issued by the SACP, July 13 2010



The Pan Africanist Congress (PAC) has called on South Africans not to
put the country to shame with "senseless, misguided violence" which
served only to rob people of their lives and property.
Sapa 14 July 2010

"The PAC condemns in the strongest possible terms the spectre of new
xenophobic attacks on our fellow African foreign nationals," PAC foreign
and international affairs secretary Mudini Maivha said in a statement on
Tuesday.

"There can be no justification for attacks already taking place in some
parts of the our country," he said, reminding people that it was only a
few days ago that the country united behind Ghana as the only team
carrying Africa's hopes at the Fifa World Cup.

Maivha said the PAC reiterated its call to the government in December
2007, before the previous outbreak of xenophobic violence, to set up an
inter-ministerial committee to devise plans against xenophobia, and
mobilise communities to support these programmes.

A series of incidents have occurred in the Western Cape, where on Sunday
night a number of foreign-owned spaza and container shops in Cape Town
and surrounding towns were burned and looted.

Some vandalism and attempted looting continued during the day on Monday
in Khayelitsha, where police helped Somali shop owners remove their goods.

Police said on Tuesday morning, however, that the situation was "calm".

However, Methodist Bishop Paul Verryn has since reported received
threats against himself and foreign nationals living at the Central
Methodist Church in Johannesburg.

Zimbabwe's Movement for Democratic Change's (MDC) spokesperson in South
Africa Sibanengi Dube said the party had received more than 200 calls
from distressed Zimbabweans fearing xenophobic attacks.

Mozambican officials said on Tuesday that they would do everything
possible to protect the lives of the more than three million Mozambicans
living and working in South Africa.

On Monday, President Jacob Zuma said though there had been rumours of
planned new xenophobic violence, he was not certain there had been
actual threats.

He said the government had established a ministerial commission to deal
with the situation and people "should not have fears".

In May, Gauteng-based academics said foreigners feared a resurgence of
xenophobic violence against them after the 2010 World Cup.

In 2008, 62 people died and 150 000 were displaced in a wave of
xenophobic attacks which started in Gauteng.

The South African Communist Party and the National Education, Health and
Allied Workers' Union have blamed the latest attacks on criminals and
not xenophobia.

They have called for action on service delivery problems and social
problems in communities.

The South African Institute of Race Relations has also warned that there
has been little change in the environment that gave rise to the
xenophobia attacks of 2008. - Sapa



I was threatened - Verryn
Sapa 13 July 2010

Bishop Paul Verryn has received threats against himself and foreign
nationals living at the Central Methodist Church in Johannesburg, he
said on Tuesday.

"There had been some direct threats," the cleric told reporters.

Verryn said a man approached him at a traffic light on the corner of
Republic and William Nichol roads in northern Johannesburg on Sunday and
told him: "We want you to know if it [xenophobic violence] starts, we
will be coming to the church."

Verryn said it was clear that this was meant as a threat.

He had also been told that people plotted, during an event celebrating
Youth Day on June 16, to attack his house in Soweto.

On Monday night, foreigners at the church said they had been threatened
by metro police officers.

"The metro police had come [to the church] and said they would be coming
for the people," said Verryn, whose church is known to be a haven for
homeless foreign nationals.

As he left the church to go home, he confronted metro officers sitting
in a vehicle outside. The officers told him they were there to clamp
down on illegal street trading.

Verryn was speaking to the media in Johannesburg alongside Zimbabwe's
opposition Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) and several other civil
society groups.

The MDC's spokesman in South Africa, Sibanengi Dube, said the party had
received more than 200 calls from distressed Zimbabweans fearing
xenophobic attacks.

"Since Sunday, we've been receiving calls... I received 207 calls from
members of the party who say they can't go home," said Dube.

The calls were from all corners of the country, but most of them came
from the Western Cape.

"I received calls of individuals who claimed to have been beaten up,"
said Dube.

In the Western Cape, attacks and shop lootings were reported in
Daveyton, Cape Town, Philippi, Nyanga, Khayelitsha, Pearl East,
Wellington, Mbekweni and Klapmuts.

Dube expressed "limited faith" in the police.

"Scores of youths are reportedly looting and threatening foreigners in
full view of police officers," said Dube.

He called for foreign nationals fearing attacks to form security groups
and not walk around alone.

The MDC called on the South African government to set up special courts
to deal with xenophobic threats.

"[The government] should not wait for blood to be spilled in the
townships and squatter camps but must put under lock and key all those
making threats," said Dube.

"We are advising members to report threats and attacks to the MDC and we
will also report the incidents to the police on behalf of the members."

Any foreign national in need of help can contact the MDC on 073-137-9175
or 076-323-3723. - Sapa



Environment still conducive to xenophobia?
Sapa 13 July 2010

There has been little change in the environment that gave rise to the
xenophobia attacks of 2008, the SA Institute of Race Relations warned on
Tuesday.

Spokeswoman Catherine Schulze said the institute was not predicting an
outbreak of violence, as there was not enough information to do so.

But it was cautioning that the environment that gave rise to the attacks
of 2008 was "largely unchanged".

"Poverty, unemployment, and incomes indicators have not shifted
significantly since 2008, while high levels of crime and violence are an
everyday reality in many poor communities.

"At the same time, reports of increased threats, some disguised as jokes
and idle banter, created an enabling environment for a renewed series of
attacks."

She said the institute urged the government and the African National
Congress to use their leadership positions to change perceptions that
many black South Africans harboured towards foreign African immigrants.

Senior government figures should make "concerted public statements"
condemning xenophobia.

The institute's statement followed a series of incidents in the Western
Cape, where on Sunday night a number of foreign-owned spaza and
container shops in Cape Town and surrounding towns were burned and looted.

Some vandalism and attempted looting continued during the day on Monday
in Khayelitsha, where police helped Somali shop owners remove their goods.

Police said on Tuesday morning however that the situation was "calm".

On Monday, President Jacob Zuma said though there had been rumours of
planned new xenophobic violence, he was not certain there had been
actual threats.

He said the government had established a ministerial commission to deal
with the situation and people "should not have fears".

In May, Gauteng-based academics said foreigners feared a resurgence of
xenophobic violence against them after the 2010 World Cup.

In 2008, 62 people died and 150 000 were displaced in a wave of
xenophobic attacks which started in Gauteng. - Sapa



Casual xenophobic threats increasing - SAIRR
Catherine Schulze 13 July 2010

Catherine Schulze says anti-immigrant hostility endures

The Unit for Risk Analysis at the South African Institute of Race
Relations has urged senior leaders in Government to make a series of
concerted public statements condemning threats of xenophobic violence.

The Institute said that it was receiving information that casual threats
and insinuations of violence against foreign African migrants were
increasing. An Institute spokesperson, Catherine Schulze, said that it
was a frustrating environment, as all the information at hand was
anecdotal. It was very difficult to find hard facts on the extent to
which the threats were escalating.

Schulze said that the Institute was not predicting an outbreak of
violence as there was not enough information at hand to make such a
prediction. Rather it was cautioning that the environment that gave rise
to the attacks of 2008 was largely unchanged. Poverty, unemployment, and
incomes indicators had not shifted significantly since 2008, while high
levels of crime and violence were an everyday reality in many poor
communities. At the same time, reports of increased threats, some
disguised as jokes and idle banter, created an enabling environment for
a renewed series of attacks.

Schulze said there was no point in the Government's denying the presence
of xenophobic prejudice in the country as attacks had continued to occur
since 2008, although not on the same scale as those of that year. The
Institute had previously been told that the police were unable to devote
resources to determining the exact extent of these attacks.

The Institute now urged the Government and the ANC to use their
leadership positions in the country to change the perceptions that many
black South Africans harboured towards foreign African immigrants. The
Institute described this discrimination as possibly the most prevalent
form of overt racism in the country.

In the main, this prejudice appeared to revolve around the view that
foreign Africans ‘stole' jobs, services, and even women that should
belong to South Africans. Schulze said that on balance the presence of
migrants had a positive economic impact on the countries that received
them. Migrants introduced new skills and levels of entrepreneurship,
formed new consumer markets, and contributed to tax revenue through VAT
and in some cases even income and company taxation.

Statement issued by Catherine Schulze, Unit for Risk Analysis, South
African Institute of Race Relations, July 13 2010




No xenophobic outbreaks in Durban city townships
SABC 12 July 2010

Police in Durban have strongly condemned the perpetuation of rumours of
xenophobic threats against foreign nationals in some of the city's
townships. This follows reports that threats are escalating in informal
settlements in Chatsworth, KwaNdengezi and Dassenhoek outside Durban.
Police spokesperson Vincent Mdunge says no incidents have been reported
at any of their police stations.

In Cape Town, police have arrested seven people for allegedly looting
businesses owned by foreigners in Filippi, Nyanga, Khayelitsha and
Gugulethu. Earlier, Western Cape Disaster Management said that there had
been sporadic incidents of violence against foreigners in Cape Town.

Refugee rights group PASSOP has commended Cape Town police for their
swift arrests.

However Cosatu has called on the country's law enforcement agencies to
respond more decisively to the growing threat of xenophobic attacks to
ensure the safety of the people. There are concerns of a possible
recurrence of the violence that left 62 people dead and 150 000 homeless
in 2008.

Dumisani Mthalane of the South African National Civic Organisation has
called on government to convene a summit to discuss issues related to
xenophobia.



Foreigners are 'scapegoats
Lavern De Vries and Ivor Powell 13 July 2010

A failure of leadership and local government structures has created a
fertile ground for the breeding of xenophobic violence in the Cape's
informal settlements.

While a prompt show of force by law enforcement authorities - with the
hardcore back-up of military armoured vehicles in risk areas such as Du
Noon, Khayelitsha and Masiphumelele - appears to have headed off a
threatened cycle of violence that erupted at the weekend, few think the
problem is going to go away.

At the conclusion of the World Cup on Sunday, a sudden spike in attacks
on foreigners in informal settlements around the Cape peninsula raised
fears that a new cycle of xenophobic violence - like the conflagration
that raged in 2008, when more than 60 people were killed - was about to
be unleashed.

Nearly a dozen incidents of violence against foreigners - most of them
Somali shopkeepers - were recorded between Sunday, the day of the World
Cup final between Spain and the Netherlands, and yesterday morning.

After the weekend's attacks, scores of Somalis have taken refuge in
police stations and community halls around the Cape.

Zimbabweans continued to flee for their lives from informal settlements
to congregate at makeshift places of refuge around highway truckstops
and filling stations on the N1, seeking transport back to their country.

In their official responses, police dismissed the sudden spike in
xenophobic violence as unconnected crimes.

However, the attacks have come in the midst of a whispering campaign in
townships and informal settlements around the country, warning
foreigners to leave South Africa before the end of the World Cup - or
face the consequences.

In at least one instance, in Blikkiesdorp, this threat was conveyed via
a meeting of the local community apparently convened by local leaders.

But in most cases the threat of violence has been voiced anonymously in
the impersonal environment of taxis, trains and shebeens.

According to social conflict analyst Stef Snel, the tension can be
traced back to basic economic circumstances and to a competition by
communities for scarce resources.

"There isn't enough to go around, it is that simple - not enough
housing, not enough jobs, not enough food," Snel said.

"And most of what there is comes in the form of government handouts, to
be administered by often corrupt and unaccountable councillors and civic
officials.

"Control over these resources is not only power, it is also profit. And
the problem is that everything - from positions on housing lists to job
creation programmes to food distribution initiatives - gets sold, and
rather than alleviating the social problems, often exacerbates them.

"Then, when the community loses patience, the foreigners get blamed.
They are the convenient scapegoats," he said.

The problem is not new. After the 2008 xenophobic attacks, the focus
fell particularly on two elements in the social dynamic as breeding
grounds for xenophobic violence: migrant workers at informal
settlements; and a largely opportunistic leadership that had established
itself in the ANC's onetime struggle alliance partner, the SA National
Civics Organisation (Sanco).

In 2008, several Sanco leaders overtly supported the drive to expel
foreigners from the country, and, in some cases were suspected of being
behind the violence directed against them.

Chris Stali, Sanco provincial secretary, said threats against foreigners
reflected "political immaturity and a lack of understanding of the issues".

"We have a new leadership now. The old leadership stole services and
projects and when the community asked about jobs, they said they must
ask the foreigners. Our leadership is different, we don't have our own
political and financial interests."

But the new Sanco leadership is not having it all its own way.

In areas such as Du Noon, the former Sanco leadership - though suspended
by Sanco nationally, and though last elected in 1997 (ostensibly for a
single year term) - is refusing to stand down.

The chairperson of the "other" Sanco - who has also been named as
fomenting xenophobic violence in the area - continues to administer a
feeding programme in the area, which one youth league leader in the area
said had never fed the hungry of Du Noon.

The youth leader, wanting to remain anonymous for fear of her safety,
said the suspended Sanco leadership also continued to control the
provision of RDP housing in the area.

* This article was originally published on page 9 of Cape Argus on
July 13, 2010



POLICE BLAME CRIMINALS:Xeno fears as shops looted
CARYN DOLLEY, YUSUF MOOLlA, SAPA 13 July 2010

Foreign shopkeepers in several of Cape Town's townships and surrounding
towns relived the horror attacks of 2008 yesterday, as their businesses
were targeted and looted. Many sought refuge at police stations.

Police Minister Nathi Mthethwa and Defence Minister Lindiwe Sisulu flew
to Cape Town to assess the situation.

Sisulu warned that the authorities would deal harshly with
"opportunistic criminals".

"There is no way we will allow them to spread fear and crime. We are
working very hard to find them and prosecute them," she said.

In Durban, rumours that some foreigners were chased out of KwaMashu were
dismissed by police as a possible "smear" aimed at damaging the
country's image post-World Cup.

Police confirmed there were no reports of attacks. Durban residents were
saying "no" to xenophobic threats.

Mthethwa's spokesman, Zweli Mnisi, said: "There were calls that we would
not build World Cup stadiums and that the tournament would be a failure.
We were threatened that violence would take place during the World Cup,
but the country has passed with flying colours and the police feel this
is just another rumour."

The police's main concern was criminals damaging property, attacking and
killing people and then hiding behind xenophobia, Mnisi said.

"These are actions with criminal intent, not xenophobia."

Some foreigners ran informal businesses and kept large amounts of cash.
"Because of this they become (criminal) targets."

The government would continue to use the special courts commissioned for
the World Cup, to ensure quick justice, he said.

Mnisi told The Mercury's sister newspaper the Cape Times that Mthethwa
had visited Mbekweni in Paarl and had established that criminals "using
xenophobia as a guise" were behind the lootings.

KZN Refugee Council spokesman Baruti Amisi said there were no further
reports of foreigners fleeing, as was the case last week, when
Zimbabwean and Mozambican citizens left the Bottlebrush informal
settlement in Chatsworth, as well as in KwaNdenqezi and Dassenhoek.

In Khayelitsha, Cape Town, yesterday, police officers fired rubber
bullets at residents after mostly Somali shop owners were threatened and
some businesses were ransacked.

The shopkeepers, with their belongings crammed into bakkies, were
escorted by heavily armed officers to the local police station.
Residents then trashed their empty shops.

Shopkeeper Ali Mohamed Husein said: "These people called us
'makwerekwere' and said we must go home. They said no one from another
land is going to stay here. They got into my shop and took away my
stuff. In 2008 (during the initial outbreak of xenophobic violence in
the Western Cape) I was forced out of Wesbank. Now I'm being forced from
here.

"There is fighting in Somalia, but I'll rather go back there."

Another store owner, Abduragman Alikar, said his shop had been "torn down".

"They took everything and I don't have a shop any more. I must stay at
the police station now."

Police officers stood guard and sometimes aimed their guns at residents
who started forming groups around a Somali-run store.

"I'm scared they're going to hurt me. I'm not feeling okay. I was told
that if I don't leave here I will be attacked," a trembling Abdulla
Muhamed, 19, said while standing outside his friend's shop, which
residents had tried to loot earlier.

They were dispersed by police who fired rubber bullets.

Shop owner Muhammed Husein had fled his business after being threatened
earlier and his worried friends milled outside later.

"Muhammed, are you okay? Where are you?" a friend could be heard saying
as he left a message on Husein's phone.

Another friend arranged for a bakkie into which his goods were piled.
When the vehicle was driven to the nearby police station, officers clung
on to the back of it clutching their guns.

Husein later returned and helped clear his possessions.

"These people think work is difficult. But I know how to make business.
If they let me back, I'll come," he said as he and policemen packed
crates of meat, bread and juice on to the bakkie.

As Husein left under police escort, a number of his neighbours waved
sadly. "This is so unfair. I don't know why my people are doing this," a
woman muttered.

As soon as police and the Somalis left, a group of residents ran to the
locked and nearly bare shop.

They tore down the front walls made of corrugated iron, ripped the
locked security gate off and even stole the door. Young men then entered
with hammers and damaged the interior. Children stole potatoes and
scattered coffee granules on the floor.

In picturesque Franschhoek, police station spokeswoman Marize Papier
said all foreign-owned stores in two informal settlements there had been
closed.

Cases of looting were also reported to police in Paarl, Klapmuts and
Nyanga. Police and soldiers were deployed.

There have been rumours that xenophobic violence is likely in the
aftermath of the World Cup and that foreigners have been fleeing the
Western Cape.

Mthethwa last week angrily dismissed the speculation. He said an
investigation had shown that those leaving were foreign migrant workers
returning home.

He accused politicians who had raised the spectre of violence of being
"peddlers of fear".



Police warning as foreigners pack bags
NTOKOZO MFUSI The Mercury 12 July

A NUMBER of foreigners have begun abandoning informal settlements in
Durban as threats of xenophobic attacks after the World Cup gain momentum.

Falakhe Mhlongo, a community leader at the Bottlebrush informal
settlement in Chatsworth, said foreigners, mostly from Zimbabwe and
Mozambique, had left the area over the past week.

"With the World Cup ending, people have left because they are scared,"
he said.

There were also reports of a number of foreigners leaving settlements in
KwaNdengezi and Dassenhoek.

Zimbabwean community leader Shepherd Zvavanhu said people had left the
city, fearing victimisation.

Although authorities have said the threats are just rumours, xenophobic
comments and threats were becoming more common on Facebook.

Refugee organisations and political groups said the threats had been
circulating since 2009, but had intensified in the past two months.

KZN Refugee Council chairman Baruti Amisi said: "These rumours are not new.

"After the 2008 xenophobic attacks, some locals have been telling
foreigners to leave before the end of the World Cup because there will
be large-scale attacks."

Amisi said no one knew the source of the threats, but they were still
being taken seriously.

"People are scared and some have packed their things and gone back to
their countries, but what about those who have no home and the only home
they have is this country?

"What is to happen to them?"

There were also reports of Zimbabweans leaving informal settlements in
the Western Cape last week.

Police Minister Nathi Mthethwa's spokesman, Zweli Mnisi, said the
government was aware of the rumours, which were being investigated.

"We appeal to locals and foreigners to please report anything that they
know (about the threats) to their local police so we can swiftly deal
with the culprits."

Mnisi said they would adopt a harsh stance against people caught burning
homes and looting, and their approach to crime would be swift as it was
during the World Cup.



Mob ransacks Somali-owned shop
Mpumi Kiva 12 July 2010

A Somali-owned shop has been ransacked just metres away from where the
National Police Commissioner was making an anti-xenophobia speech.

While Nathi Mthethwa told the Khayelitsha community that people who
attacked foreigners risked the full might of the law, a crowd of about
200 people was looting a shop nearby.

When the Daily Voice arrived at the scene, shopkeeper Deego Mohamed was
frantically packing what was left of his stock into a car.

Mohamed said the mob entered his shop shortly after 1pm on Friday and
started helping themselves.

"One of them was armed with a gun and he told me to shut up while others
were taking the groceries," he said.

Police spokeswoman Nosiphiwo Mtengwana said another shop in the area
hurriedly packed up as well after the news of the first attack spread.

However, locals who attended Mthethwa's meeting vowed to protect
foreigners living amongst them.

Community leader Michael Hamco told the Daily Voice that those who
attack foreigners are nothing but thugs.

"These are just criminals who roam the street and have nothing to do,"
he said.

"We will protect the foreign nationals. We don't want anyone who has the
intention of attacking the foreigners living here with us."

A fired-up Mthethwa told the crowd of about 500 people, which included
Somalis, that criminals considering attacking foreigners would face the
full might of the law.

"The police will take these things very seriously," he vowed.

"The people who are behind this are criminals." - Daily Voice



They should all leave and f*** off'
Shain Germaner 12 July 2010

A meeting that was meant to unite residents of the Ramaphosa informal
settlement turned ugly last night when locals voiced their hatred of
foreigners.

"Why should I suffer in my own country? They should all leave and f***
off," a man screamed into the microphone.

The thousand-strong audience cheered in response.

But this was just one of dozens of hateful comments, many suggesting
that unless the government removes the foreigners, violence could erupt.

The meeting, led by the International Community Unifiers (ICU),
community leaders and local government, was interrupted constantly by
residents' stories of their terrible encounters with foreigners.

A member of the audience described his experience when he was robbed at
gunpoint.

It was when ICU president Dennis Mpangane took the stage to speak to the
crowd that the audience turned ugly.

He began by mentioning that he was not originally from South Africa, to
which the audience responded with hundreds of shouts of "hamba" and "Go
home".

Mpangane, unable to be heard over the screams of the crowd, then chose
not to speak for the rest of the meeting.

A local priest, Reverend Brian Lehoko, and a police superintendent,
known only as Mathebula, managed to calm the audience after the
interruption.

Mathebula called on the residents to report any violent crimes,
especially xenophobic attacks, to the police as soon as possible.

"The police will be here day and night," he added.

The meeting also addressed service delivery issues that resulted in a
protest earlier this year, and it was during these complaints that
residents began to speak against xenophobia.

"We had two agendas today: service delivery and xenophobia," announced a
resident, "but service delivery projects will be put on hold if
(xenophobic violence) happens."

The community was again promised by ward councillor Craig Bennetts and
representatives from the Department of Housing that plans to tackle the
road, sewerage and electricity issues were "on the move".

After the meeting, when the crowd dispersed, Mpangane said: "The meeting
went as well as it could have. The community were angry about service
delivery and I couldn't speak, but they do understand the (xenophobia)
situation."

Ramaphosa residents were one of the centres of violence two years ago.

Somali shopkeeper Abdi Ismael has lived in Ramaphosa for four years, and
was greatly affected by the xenophobic violence in 2008.

"I had three shops," he said, "but I had to leave (Ramaphosa) when the
attacks started. When I returned (several months later), they had all
been looted and vandalised."

Ismael has been threatened - again. "Come the end of the World Cup,
you'll be leaving," warned a client of his.

"Others have told me 'this shop will be ours'," said Ismael.

"Of course I'm worried, but the community will try its best to be on top
of the situation. I'm just hoping the words won't escalate into violence."

* This article was originally published on page 2 of The Star on
July 12, 2010



Foreigners seek refuge at police stations
Sapa 12 July 2010

A heavy police and military presence has been deployed in Western Cape
townships following sporadic xenophobic violence, police said on Monday.

Provincial authorities said scores of foreigners had sought refuge at
police stations in the region.

Police spokesman Captain Frederick van Wyk said that on Sunday night
there were "sporadic incidents of looting" at shops belonging to foreigners.

Areas where this occurred included Nyanga, Philippi East and Khayelitsha
on the Cape Flats, Wellington, Paarl East, Mbekweni (a Paarl township),
Franschhoek and Klapmuts.

"Police responded and a heavy police contingency was deployed in
conjunction with Metro Police and SANDF [the defence force] in all these
areas," Van Wyk said.

He said seven men, aged between 19 and 30, had been arrested in the
Nyanga area.

They were charged with public violence and would appear in the Phillipi
Magistrates' Court on Monday.

"SAPS [the police] will continue to deploy in high numbers to maintain
law and order in the mentioned areas," he said.

"Tranquillity has been restored and no further reports of violence have
been reported."

Spokeswoman for provincial disaster management Daniella Ebenezer said
earlier that 70 foreigners had sought refuge overnight at Mbekweni
police station in Paarl and 22 at Wellington.

There were smaller numbers at police stations in Franschhoek, and Langa
and Harare on the Cape Flats.

They had gone to the stations "mainly because they were fearful", but in
some instances following attacks on shops.

Ebenezer said there were "sporadic" attacks on shops on Saturday in the
region, and "some incidents of looting" on Sunday.

No-one had been seriously injured.

She said that according to reports from police, on Sunday spaza shops
and containers also used as shops were "damaged" in Mbekweni, Paarl
East, Wellington and Nyanga.

The province and municipalities were ready with contingency plans, she said.

Die Burger newspaper reported on Monday that shortly before midnight on
Sunday, police advised foreigners, mainly Somalis, to leave the Cape
Flats township of Nyanga, and escorted numbers of them out of the area.

The newspaper carried a photograph of Somali spaza shops in flames in
Philippi, also on the Cape Flats. - Sapa



We condemn against this alarmist phobia
Sapa 9 July 2010

High-ranking politicans had become "peddlers of fear" over xenophobia,
Police Minister Nathi Mthethwa said on Friday.

"We condemn and caution against this alarmist phobia by those who fuel
these rumours," he said in what his ministry distributed as the text of
a speech at a xenophobia summit in Khayelitsha.

"These are the people who prior to the 2010 Fifa World Cup embarked on
the infamous smear campaign, saying there will be bloodbath in this
country and that crime is spiralling out of control," he said.

"It becomes such a pity when those who claim to be leaders are supposed
to discharge leadership and guidance to project a common cause, end up
being the peddlers of fear and anxiety."

The minister's comments were aimed at "leaders who hold high positions
in government and in society", his ministry said.

On Thursday Mthethwa dismissed as "hysteria" reports that foreigners
were fleeing the Western Cape in anticipation of a backlash again them
after the tournament.

He said an investigation showed that the scores of foreigners leaving
the city in the past few days were seasonal workers returning home.

Head of the Western Cape's local government department Hildegarde Fast
told reporters on Friday morning that police had assessed the threat of
xenophobic violence in the province as "low".

"In their view there is a low level of threat," said Fast.

She would not indicate whether there had been a relative rise or
decrease in the level of the risk in recent weeks as South Africa hosted
the world's biggest sporting event.

Fast said Western Cape authorities had a reliable monitoring system and
passed reports of any risk of community conflict to the police to
investigate.

Mediators were also sent in to defuse tension, which generally arose
from a battle for scarce resources.

"We are responding to the fact that there are increased reports. The
province feels the main focus is on preventing anything from happening,"
she said.

"If one feels the level of threat is rising in a particular community,
the police are committed to immediately deploying extra resources to
have quite a visible presence."

The head of disaster management in Cape Town, Greg Pillay, said the city
could not afford a repeat of the 2008 outbreak of xenophobia that made
headlines around the world.

The crisis claimed 70 lives countrywide and cost Cape Town authorities
some R200 million of which most was spent on providing shelter for
foreigners.

"We learnt many lessons from 2008 and the emphasis definitely is really
on pro-active actions; what can we do to reduce the risk.... From the
city's side, we also have an early warning system," he said.

Fast said every disaster management district in the province had
identified places of safety where foreigners under threat could be
accommodated.

"That is the absolute fall-back position."

Rumours of a post world cup outbreak of xenophobia have persisted since
late May when a group of eminent global leaders called the "Elders"
warned foreigners might be targeted after the event as jobs start
becoming scarcer.

Former Ireland president Mary Robinson, a member of the group, said at
the time: "We are more worried after the world cup, the possibilities of
xenophobia... construction jobs fall away and people, especially from
Zimbabwe, will be looking for jobs."

But Fast said authorities saw no special reason why the risk of
xenophobia would be greater after the tournament, and could not pinpoint
the cause of rumours of imminent attacks.

"I would just be speculating if I said why there would be more rumours
now than before the world cup," she told reporters. - Sapa



South Africa Braces for New Attacks on Immigrants
By BARRY BEARAK NY Times 9 July 2010

JOHANNESBURG — The World Cup ends Sunday, and South Africa, like some
cartoon figure with an angel above one shoulder and the devil atop the
other, will revel in its successful hosting of the tournament while
bracing for possible violence aimed at the impoverished immigrants in
its midst.

For months, threats have coursed through virtually every township and
squatter camp, with warnings that once the final whistle blows, the
tourists leave and the world looks away, vuvuzelas and banners will be
replaced by torches and panga knives as attacks begin against
Zimbabweans, Mozambicans and others.

“They tell us that by Sunday we must go or we will see blood, plenty
blood,” said Precious Ncube, 25, a Zimbabwean living in a township near
Pretoria.

Many in the government regard these threats as rumors inflated into
hysteria through repetition. Nevertheless, security forces are on “high
alert,” Police Minister Nathi Mthethwa said last week. The military has
already demonstrated its muscle in some presumed hot spots. Human rights
groups and the Nelson Mandela Foundation have issued pleas for calm.

On Friday, as some immigrants fled the country, the powerful Congress of
South African Trade Unions, or Cosatu, urged the government to open
stadiums for people who might need havens, saying, “Surely, given the
billions of rands we just spent on the World Cup, where we did not spare
any expense, we cannot now risk people’s lives.”

There is good reason for apprehension.

During two weeks in May 2008, at least 60 people, mostly from nearby
African nations, were killed by mobs. The violence, stomped out in one
place only to reappear in others, occurred in Johannesburg, Cape Town,
Durban and elsewhere. About 35,000 people were hounded from their homes.

These paroxysms of burning and looting were called “xenophobic riots,”
and the defining image, published throughout the world, was that of a
Mozambican man in the final moments of his life after being set ablaze.

The government was slow to intervene. Thabo Mbeki, then the president,
spoke out only belatedly. Thousands of the uprooted slept on the floors
of police stations, churches and community halls. South African
volunteers, appalled by the attacks, fed the hungry and organized shelters.

Fungai Makota, a 36-year-old Zimbabwean woman who owns a tiny grocery in
a Johannesburg township, remembered being chased from her shop in 2008.
Her entire inventory was looted, and her husband, a Mozambican, suffered
serious head wounds after a furious pummeling.

Like so many others, she is trying to figure out why these threats have
resurfaced now and how much danger she is in. Should she stay or go,
continue to sell her groceries or hide them?

“So many people tell me, ‘You must return where you came from; your time
in South Africa is up,’ ” Ms. Makota said. “But I have lived here eight
years. My life is here now.”

During the past month, this country has shown its best side to the
world. Leaders from both government and business have declared that
South Africa has successfully “rebranded” itself, recasting an image
tarnished by AIDS, poverty and corruption into one of geniality,
prosperity and competence.

Part of the nation’s charm has been its spirit of pan-African
brotherhood. When South Africa’s team was eliminated from the World Cup,
loyalties turned in lockstep to Ghana, the only team from the continent
to advance.

But many citizens here, particularly the poor who cobble their hovels
from rusty metal and scrap wood, resent the estimated five million
foreigners who have crossed the border looking for work in Africa’s
largest economy. About a third of this nation’s workers are unemployed,
and immigrants are commonly blamed for taking their jobs or robbing
their homes.

“These foreigners have no IDs, no papers, and yet they get the jobs,”
said Ephraim Magoele, 26, an unemployed South African. “They are willing
to work for 15 rand a day,” about $2. “When I need money, I have to call
my mother and ask her for some money from her pension. Why should this be?”

Such resentment is easy to heat into hatred — and easy to exploit.

The Forced Migration Studies Program at the University of the
Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, which has examined the nation’s
continuing xenophobic impulses, concludes that local political leaders
often instigate the violence as a means to advance personal agendas.
Business owners sometimes support it to wipe out competition. Looters
certainly profit.

Most South Africans deplored the 2008 attacks. In fact, many in the
shack settlements defended their foreign neighbors or offered places to
hide. Even now, it is hard to find people who say they will take part in
a purge of immigrants — but not so hard to find those who would support it.

“It is up to the foreigners whether we are required to beat them or kill
them; whatever, they must go,” said Johannes Thabompooa, 41, who claimed
he lost his job four years ago and had not worked since.

The timing of the threatened attacks is decidedly bizarre, as if the
perpetrators consider it appropriate to kill foreigners, but wrong to
interfere with the World Cup in doing so. In an editorial, the South
African newspaper The Mail and Guardian called that kind of thinking a
“calculated sort of pseudopatriotism.”

The local news media’s persistent reporting of the threats has added to
the fear. On Thursday, prominence was given to an episode near Cape Town
in which a Zimbabwean man, Reason Wandi, was thrown from a train. He
said his attackers condemned him as a foreigner as they opened the door.

In many settlements, there is now an expectation of violence, and news
of one outbreak may well become the spark for others. There is always
plenty of tinder amid the close quarters — disputes about housing and
crime, about water and toilets, about winnings in a card game, and about
who sleeps with whom.

During any unrest, foreign shopkeepers are almost reflexively singled
out. Shahid Butt, a Pakistani, runs the Vuwani Corner, a small but busy
grocery in Diepsloot, a township north of Johannesburg. His store was
looted in 2008 and again six months later in a second round of attacks.

Weeks ago, he stopped replenishing his inventory, and said that he
intended to remove merchandise during the weekend as a precaution.

“Some guys come in here talking nonsense and say, ‘We will show you
after the World Cup,’ ” Mr. Butt said defiantly, shaking his head. “Show
me what?”

He put an apple down on the counter.

“If you want to eat this food, you have to grab it with your hand,” he
said as a line of customers waited. “This apple will not jump into your
mouth. I came here nine years ago and I have a business. Why don’t the
local people have a business? Because you can’t get anything if you sit
at home.”



Tackle xenophobia now
Sunday Times Editorial 11 July 2010

Sunday Times Editorial : The assertion by minister of police Nathi
Mthethwa that scores of foreigners who fled Cape Town this week are mere
seasonal workers and not victims of xenophobic threats is unfortunate.
Current Font Size:
Related Articles

* Terrified fugitives on the run again

He is chairman of the interministerial committee on xenophobia, and the
statement just shows how out of touch that committee is with reality .

Not only has it undermined what appears to be genuine fears of another
xenophobic explosion, but the statement gives the impression of a public
representative who does not take the dilemma of these potential victims
seriously.

South Africa cannot afford a repeat of the xenophobic mayhem it
witnessed two years ago when violence against foreign nationals turned
this country and its people into an uncivilised lot. It was partly due
to the government's sluggish response that the violence reached such
heinous proportions at the time.

It is rather dubious that Mthethwa and his cabinet colleagues also blame
the media for spreading the rumour. For the record, this rumour first
originated with, among others, the ANC, of which Mthethwa is a leader,
which devoted some considerable time - at its last national executive
committee meeting - to discussing the issue.

Rather than shift the goalposts, the interministerial committee must
begin to address the underlying causes of xenophobia. This must include
addressing the plight of the poor masses who have yet to reap any
benefits of freedom.

Freedom will forever remain elusive as long as they continue to witness
the rich getting richer while their situation is rapidly deteriorating.
www.sundaytribune.co.za



Khayelitsha attacks 'not xenophobic
Sapa 10 July 2010

A foreign national was shot dead and two others were wounded in a
shooting incident on Saturday in Khayelitsha near Cape Town, Western
Cape police said.

However, Captain Frederick van Wyk said the incident was not a
xenophobic attack.

He said the three foreigners, who are all shop owners, were on their way
from Khayelitsha to buy stock at Philippi Cash and Carry when they were
hijacked at a traffic light.

The three suspects drove the bakkie to Sweethome Farms and robbed them
of an undisclosed amount of money before shooting them.

One of them was killed instantly while the two others who were wounded
were taken to hospital.

Van Wyk said police were investigating a case of murder, attempted
murder and hijacking.

"This is regarded as a crime incident and cannot be attributed to
violence at a certain foreign national," he said. - Sapa



Terrified fugitives on the run again: They fled turmoil and poverty - now they flee xenophobia
PHILANI NOMBEMB 11 July 2010

Zimbabweans who fled political turmoil and poverty at home are returning
to their country in droves - terrified of another outbreak of xenophobic
violence in South Africa.

quote 'I had no option but to leave. It is like jumping from one frying
pan into another' quote

Foster Baloyi, 26, who has worked on a farm in Groblersdal for nine
years, was camped yesterday on the side of the road at the Musina border.

He had spent the past three days there with his eight-month-old
daughter, wife and three brothers in an old bakkie loaded with
belongings - with no money or petrol to get to Zimbabwe.

"We don't want to take chances with our lives. The community said they
will burn us if we don't go. We just packed our things and left," he
said. The family has been surviving on oranges.

Hunched dispiritedly on suitcases and piles of bedding, people camped on
the N1 highway outside Cape Town this week, hoping to hitch truck rides
to Johannesburg.

Refugees, workers and NGOs fear more xenophobic attacks after the World
Cup in a repeat of the 2008 flare-up that claimed more than 60 lives and
left thousands displaced in refugee camps.

The minister of police, Nathi Mthethwa, said security agencies were on
high alert, but this week criticised high-ranking politicians and
rumours for fuelling the "hysteria".

Mthethwa told NGOs and residents of Khayelitsha on Friday: "These are
the people who prior to the 2010 Fifa World Cup embarked on the infamous
smear campaign, saying there will be a bloodbath in this country and
that crime is spiralling out of control."

The minister said foreigners leaving Cape Town were just "seasonal workers".

But as he spoke, armed thugs robbed a nearby Somali shop, which was then
looted. Earlier this week, Reason Wandi, 27, a Zimbabwean, was thrown
off a moving train by a crowd that threatened foreigners.

The SA Council of Churches has set up a hotline to help victims of
xenophobic attacks.

Mthethwa's words were cold comfort to Alexander Ncube, 30, who boarded a
packed train with his wife and two children on Thursday, he said, to
save their lives. Families arrived at the Cape Town station at 5am
carrying television sets, refrigerators, chairs and carpets - jostling
to secure R250 third-class tickets on the Shosholoza Meyl to Johannesburg.

Ncube resigned as a waiter at the V&A Waterfront after living in
Philippi on the Cape Flats for four years.

"I was not a seasonal worker. My landlord said he couldn't risk his
house being destroyed by the community if I stayed longer. He was told
at a meeting not to take rent money from foreigners any more because
they are supposed to leave after the World Cup," Ncube said tearfully.

"He said the community would organise people going from door to door
checking people's identity documents. I had no option but to leave. It
is like jumping from one frying pan into another. I appreciate what my
landlord did. He saved my life."

The train carriage was packed and stuffy. The mood inside was sombre
during the 26-hour trip as parents fed wailing children dry bread.

Princess Phiri, 28, a mother of two, from a township near Muizenberg,
was displaced in the 2008 violence. "I am not a seasonal worker. I
operated a spaza shop with my husband in the township. Due to growing
threats we had to abandon the shop, sell all the stock and leave."

She slept in a stationary train at the station on Wednesday to secure
tickets, having left behind all her furniture.

"I think these threats are serious and the situation will be worse than
the previous one. Community members are threatening to follow us to the
churches if we get refuge there."

Elijah Dhliwayo, 23, a construction worker, lived in Capricorn Village
in Muizenberg. Also not a seasonal worker, he was intimidated by locals.
"I collected everything that I had and just left."

Zimbabwean activist Gabriel Shumba and director of Zimbabwe Exiles Forum
(Zef) said he sent a letter to Mthethwa as early as June 3, urging him
to take action to protect foreigners.

He said Zef had received several reports from Zimbabwean nationals, who
had been warned to leave South Africa after the World Cup.

''In some instances, they have been issued with deadlines to leave South
Africa or face xenophobic attacks," he wrote.

In Durban on Friday, a 27-year-old Zimbabwean plumber packed up his
possessions and waited to take a bus home, via Johannesburg. ''I am
scared. They told us, 'We are going to burn you.' Even when I was
packing my things, they told me it was good, and that I must go," he said.

On Friday, the SA Defence Force troops were out in force in
Johannesburg's Diepsloot. The soldiers were deployed as part of the 2010
World Cup security plan.

They searched taverns and streets. Department of Defence spokesman
Siphiwe Dlamini said the soldiers were deployed around the country for
crime prevention during the World Cup, and not to combat xenophobia.

Ncube, who once worked as a barman at the Sun International Hotel in
Harare, said: "These are not empty threats. We've got a feeling that
this will be much more dangerous than the last (round of xenophobic
violence). We are really, really shivering about it," he said.

ýNcube's surname has been changed at his request to protect his family
in Zimbabwe. - Additional reporting by Monica Laganparsad and Bongani
Mdakane
nombembepsundaytimes.co.za



Threat of xenophobia low in Cape
Sapa 9 July 2010

Police have assessed the threat of xenophobic violence in the Western
Cape as "low", a senior provincial official said on Friday as government
sought to quell fears of attacks on foreigners after the World Cup.

"In their view there is a low level of threat," said Hildegarde Fast
from the province's department of local government.

Fast would not indicate whether there had been a relative rise or
decrease in the level of the risk in recent weeks as South Africa hosted
the world's biggest sporting event.

Police Minister Nathi Mthethwa on Thursday dismissed rumours that
foreigners were fleeing Cape Town in anticipation of a backlash again
them after the tournament as "hysteria".

He said an investigation had found that the scores of foreigners leaving
the city in the past few days were seasonal workers returning home. - Sapa



We condemn against this alarmist phobia
Sapa 9 July 2010

High-ranking politicans had become "peddlers of fear" over xenophobia,
Police Minister Nathi Mthethwa said on Friday.

"We condemn and caution against this alarmist phobia by those who fuel
these rumours," he said in what his ministry distributed as the text of
a speech at a xenophobia summit in Khayelitsha.

"These are the people who prior to the 2010 Fifa World Cup embarked on
the infamous smear campaign, saying there will be bloodbath in this
country and that crime is spiralling out of control," he said.

"It becomes such a pity when those who claim to be leaders are supposed
to discharge leadership and guidance to project a common cause, end up
being the peddlers of fear and anxiety."

The minister's comments were aimed at "leaders who hold high positions
in government and in society", his ministry said.

On Thursday Mthethwa dismissed as "hysteria" reports that foreigners
were fleeing the Western Cape in anticipation of a backlash again them
after the tournament.

He said an investigation showed that the scores of foreigners leaving
the city in the past few days were seasonal workers returning home.

Head of the Western Cape's local government department Hildegarde Fast
told reporters on Friday morning that police had assessed the threat of
xenophobic violence in the province as "low".

"In their view there is a low level of threat," said Fast.

She would not indicate whether there had been a relative rise or
decrease in the level of the risk in recent weeks as South Africa hosted
the world's biggest sporting event.

Fast said Western Cape authorities had a reliable monitoring system and
passed reports of any risk of community conflict to the police to
investigate.

Mediators were also sent in to defuse tension, which generally arose
from a battle for scarce resources.

"We are responding to the fact that there are increased reports. The
province feels the main focus is on preventing anything from happening,"
she said.

"If one feels the level of threat is rising in a particular community,
the police are committed to immediately deploying extra resources to
have quite a visible presence."

The head of disaster management in Cape Town, Greg Pillay, said the city
could not afford a repeat of the 2008 outbreak of xenophobia that made
headlines around the world.

The crisis claimed 70 lives countrywide and cost Cape Town authorities
some R200 million of which most was spent on providing shelter for
foreigners.

"We learnt many lessons from 2008 and the emphasis definitely is really
on pro-active actions; what can we do to reduce the risk.... From the
city's side, we also have an early warning system," he said.

Fast said every disaster management district in the province had
identified places of safety where foreigners under threat could be
accommodated.

"That is the absolute fall-back position."

Rumours of a post world cup outbreak of xenophobia have persisted since
late May when a group of eminent global leaders called the "Elders"
warned foreigners might be targeted after the event as jobs start
becoming scarcer.

Former Ireland president Mary Robinson, a member of the group, said at
the time: "We are more worried after the world cup, the possibilities of
xenophobia... construction jobs fall away and people, especially from
Zimbabwe, will be looking for jobs."

But Fast said authorities saw no special reason why the risk of
xenophobia would be greater after the tournament, and could not pinpoint
the cause of rumours of imminent attacks.

"I would just be speculating if I said why there would be more rumours
now than before the world cup," she told reporters. - Sapa



Time and date set for Cape violence
Saturday Star 10 July 2010

While police and senior politicians have dismissed rumours that
xenophobia is brewing in several Cape communities, those on the ground
believe there is a very real threat of attacks.

In Masiphumelele, an informal settlement near Cape Town's Noordhoek, a
time and date has even been set - at 3am on July 12, after the World Cup
final. John Thomas, a local pastor, said it had gone "way beyond rumours
- the threats are very real".

In 2008, thousands of foreigners fled Masiphumelele in the wake of
attacks, but Thomas said that this time, people wouldn't run so easily.

"We may end up with counter-violence, and I think there could be
casualties on both sides."

On Thursday night, about 400 residents gathered in the Masiphumelele
community hall and demanded to meet local white employers to tell them
not to employ foreigners for low wages.

The majority also said they wanted all foreigners out of Masiphumelele.

Lutz van Dijk, director of Hokisa, a home for children with HIV and Aids
in Masiphumelele, said: "A majority of the young people made their point
clear: they want all foreigners out of Masi. Most of the older ones, and
even those who spoke out against xenophobia, were united in their anger
against 'white employers' who give the few jobs to 'the Zimbabweans and
Malawians' for bad wages."

They demanded a meeting with the "white employers" from Fish Hoek.

Ward councillor Felicity Purchase said locals wanted "illegal foreigners
in the country" to be locked up or deported. They wanted representatives
from the national government to tell them why the foreigners were being
permitted to take jobs they felt belonged to them.

About 20 percent of Masiphumelele's estimated 35 000 to 40 000
population is estimated to be foreign.

* This article was originally published on page 4 of Saturday Star on
July 10, 2010



Give migrants dignity we struggled to get
Navi Pillay Sunday Tribune 11 July 2010

BY HOSTING the World Football Cup, South Africa has shown that it can
welcome visitors from all over the globe with flair, generosity and warmth.

It should now prove that it is also able to extend such hospitality and
tolerance to migrants seeking a better life and protection in the
country of Nelson Mandela.

I am alarmed at recurrent episodes of attacks against non-nationals in
my country. Reportedly, perpetrators of these attacks have largely been
able to bank on impunity and have even been celebrated as heroes in
their own neighbourhoods.

By contrast, victims were granted no solace, no redress and no
compensation for the loss of their meagre property and for their suffering.

This approach must be reversed. The protection of all migrants is one of
today's most compelling human rights issues. Indeed, the scale and
complexity of migration is fast increasing.

Currently, about 214 million people live outside their country of
origin, many having moved for a variety of reasons in which the search
for protection and the search for opportunity are often inextricably
entwined.

There is no denying that migrant inflows represent an even greater
challenge for countries that have their own daunting problems of poverty
and scarcity of resources like South Africa.

Yet no country can escape the need, and indeed, the obligation, to
ensure that national migration policies recognise the profoundly human
nature of migration and are respectful of the human rights of all
migrants. This approach also serves the best interest of the countries
of destination.

The 2009 Human Development Report explains how development and human
rights protection are mutually reinforcing.

Migrants who are fully integrated as active members of society do decent
work and are able to speak out against discrimination or abuse, are more
productive and contribute more to host societies than those who are
exploited and socially excluded.

But the empowering potential of migration does not occur automatically.
It depends, to a large extent, on supportive and proactive policy measures.

To this effect, international human rights standards provide benchmarks,
a normative framework, and a set of guidelines for policy-makers seeking
to align their measures with international law.

These standards require, for example, that migrants be fully informed
about their rights, and responsibilities, throughout the cycle of
migration - from country of origin, to countries of transit and
destination, and in some cases to eventual return.

They stipulate that migrants have the right to just and favourable
conditions of work, to equal protection under the law, protection from
arbitrary arrest and detention, as well as the right to adequate health
and housing, and to education.

The enjoyment of these rights has made migration a positive and
empowering experience for millions, but many others continue to be
discriminated against and remain vulnerable.

Another aspect of concern is that while the economic benefit of
migration to host countries is well documented and widely accepted,
these benefits do not necessarily accrue equally to all sectors of
society. Specifically, migrants can be seen as unwelcome competition for
local workers, as well as for social services such as public health,
housing and education.

Dealing with such perceptions, whether real or imagined, is vital. Left
unaddressed, these feelings of grievance can foster xenophobia and
intolerance against migrant communities.

South Africa has taken some steps in the right direction to address
aspects of its migration problems. The creation of a High Level Inter-
Ministerial Committee on xenophobic violence against non-nationals is a
welcome development.

Moreover, the South African Police Service is working with the United
Nations to understand and tackle the root causes of anti-migration
sentiment and establish appropriate mechanisms to combat violence. The
UN, through my office, is also engaged with the South African Human
Rights Commission in a year-long project focused on addressing
discrimination and xenophobia and preventing attacks against migrants.

Much more needs to be done. Conditions of temporary detention of
non-nationals must be improved.

Crucially, detention should be a last resort: adequate options should
first be explored.

A review of the Immigration Act of 2002 could be carried out together
with the enactment of laws that specifically target xenophobia and hate
crimes, including hate speech, against non-nationals.

In this land we know that history does not look kindly upon
discrimination, exclusion and inequity. Migrants to today's South Africa
are no more tradeable commodities or lesser human beings than the
non-whites were under apartheid and its institutionalised racism.

They are our brothers and sisters. We must demand for them the same
respect, dignity and rights that we struggled for each and every South
African to enjoy. Let us demonstrate some ubuntu.

# Navi Pillay is the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights.



No xenophobia fear in KZN
Independent on Saturday 10 July 2010

POLICE say commercial rivalry and criminality appear to be at the heart
of threats of xenophobic attacks in some parts of the country, but
there's no evidence of such violence in KwaZulu-Natal.

Police were commenting after the government this week outlined a plan to
prevent any outbreak of xenophobic violence and called upon all people
to work together to prevent such attacks.

A survey by The Independent on Saturday found that some foreigners
working in Durban were worried about rumours of imminent xenophobic
violence. However, KZN police spokeswoman Brigadier Phindile Radebe
stressed that there had been no reported threats in the province.

The Minister of Police, Nathi Mthethwa, announced on Thursday that
security agencies had been put on high alert to thwart any threats or
acts of violence.

"There has been a proliferation of businesses owned by foreign nationals
in the townships and informal settlements across all provinces," he said.

"This scenario of tensions between owners of businesses owned by locals
and foreign nationals has spawned an ugly element of criminal
involvement, exploitation and manipulation of the situation," he said

Some foreigners at the Durban Refugee Reception Centre said they were
scared. But Spinks Chilengwe, 25, a Zimbabwean who has been here for
nearly three years, said he would not let a rumour force him out of the
country. - Staff Reporter



COSATU Press Statement on the Xenophobic issue in the Western Cape
COSATU 9 July 2010

More decisive solutions are required in this time of trouble.

COSATU is really concerned about the growing threats/rumours of
Xenophobic attacks taking place in the Western Cape Province. We believe
we have to respond decisively and ensure the safety of all our people,
both locals or foreigners. Should we have to act without absolute
information to guide us, we should err on the side of caution, if at
all. We have an indication of the various Governments positions on this
matter and we believe this issue is much too fraught with danger to play
petty politics with. We must act in unity to secure the best possible
outcome against this threat.

There has been lots of engagement and it appears that the following
strategy is emerging;

1. The first intervention is preparation and intelligence, ensuring that
local communities have contact persons and that contact details of the
police are circulated.

2. The second intervention is dealing with risk reduction and this calls
upon churches and community organisations to speak out against
xenophobia and promote the positive gees amongst all people that emerged
from the World Cup.

3. The third intervention is to ensure that the municipalities and their
disaster management teams are ready to assist in the event of
displacement and crisis.

This strategy seeks to not sensationalise the rumors, and to ensure that
there is a readiness to confront acts of violence. This may be an
acceptable plan to some, but Cosatu has a sense of unease about it,
because it has the risk of people dying or being injured. This lag time
between an attack and police response represents a clear and present
danger, enough of a danger to warrant preventative action. And no life
can be considered so cheap that we view injuries as collateral damage.
No parent can be asked to risk their child’s life by staying in an area
where there is a real risk of attack.

It is this danger and lack of guarantees that compels people to take
their families to places of safety rather than risk running the gauntlet.

Cosatu believes we must build an additional step into our strategy as
outlined above. This step must to confront and accommodate the reality
that many people, because of the threats, are leaving areas and being
preyed upon by truck drivers and others because of their vulnerability.
The people people leaving the areas must have a safe haven they can go
to. In this respect we call upon the municipalities to make the stadiums
in Athlone and in municipalities are available as transit points, to
which people who feel at risk can go, from where they can be taken to
community halls. This stadiums must be available from Saturday 10 July
2010 , and people entering there must give a detailed report on the
danger and source of the threats.

The police can then go into this area and investigate the source of the
threat and neutralise it by imprisoning the perpetrators. Then people
can be returned to their communities, when things are safe. Surely this
is the more humane approach that is fraught with less danger for the
affected communities.

The only possible reason for not doing this safety-first approach is the
money that may be needed from the state for the disaster management. And
surely given the billions of rands we just spent for the World Cup where
we did not spare any expense we cannot now risk peoples lives. In the
event that the threat does not materialise then we would have only the
cost of disaster mitigation, but lives would have been spared. We must
tread carefully also with the possible negative publicity around an
attack , which can undo the billions spent on the World Cup to promote
our caring image of safety and security.

For any question please call Mike Louw or Evan Abrahamse or Tony
Ehrenreich at 021 448 0046



POPCRU condemns Xenophobic intention harbored by whosoever in South Africa

POPCRU joins all progressive trade unions, civil society organizations
and all citizens in condemning unfortunate, un-African and the wayward
implications such narrow tendencies may have in the spirit of
brotherhood and sisterhood in Africa and the rest of the world.

We acknowledge the Inter-Ministerial Committee stance to take these
threats seriously and mount an enhancement of our preparedness to bring
an end to this scourge.

Perhaps it is prudent to enhance Civic Education in our communities and
education institutions around a respect for some of our constitutional
clauses pertaining to the respect for life and our human rights stance.
That may be re-enforced through the enhancement of Community Policing
Forums and Street Committees to be reliable watch-dogs of our people and
a site of struggle prudent to realize the National Democratic Society!

As POPCRU, we throw our weight to these initiatives and call our
membership to be vigilant to name and shame whosoever spreading such
decayed and prejudicial views.

Issued by:
Norman Mampane
National Spokesperson
Tel: 0112424600/4615
Cell: 0720737959
Fax: 0866253054
Email: normanm@popcru.org.za
01 Marie Road
Auckland Park
2006



Community fights xenophobia
Hlengiwe Mnguni, News24 6 July 2010

Cape Town – With the rumoured forced removal of foreign nationals from
communities around the country set to begin in less than a week, the
community of Site C in Khayelitsha is going on an anti-xenophobia
initiative to make sure that no incidences of violence connected to that
rumour unfold.

“We don’t want to take it as just a rumour,” community leader and member
of the newly-formed Site C Action Committee Against Xenophobia, Ken
Monelo, told News24.
The group, which was formed on June 29 2010, has embarked on community
education programmes including mini rallies around the area which will
culminate in one rally on July 10 at the Blue Wall community centre in
Site C.

“When you go to shebeens and listen to people talk, it is seemingly
serious,” he said.
In the past few weeks rumours have spread that when the World Cup ends
on July 11, foreign nationals should leave the country or they will be
forcibly removed by South Africans.

Monelo agreed with the theory that lack of service delivery coupled
unemployment was to blame for people who acted out violently against
foreigners, whom he said were “soft targets”.

“There are no avenues in so far as grievances are concerned,” he said.

He lamented the lack of political leadership in dealing with xenophobia
in the country, but said opening lines of communication between township
residents and foreign nationals by community leaders was also important.

He said meetings between foreign business people and the communities in
which they live would go a long way towards repairing relations.

Foreign business people, mostly Somalis, have borne the brunt of
xenophobic violence in the Western Cape.

Just a week ago, a Somali shop owner was killed in Site C, Abdi Aden, a
spokesperson for the Somali Retailers Association, told News24.

Still hopeful

“Yesterday gunmen broke into a shop and seriously injured a shop owner
in Thembani,” said Abdi who says he has also had his shop looted by a
xenophobic mob.

Despite this and the looming threat of large scale violence, Abdi said
he was confident that initiatives such as the one being spearheaded by
the area’s anti-xenophobia group and government intervention would help,
especially since the rumours have helped communities and government get
“prepared” for that possibility.

But for some community members the rumour is just fuel.

“They must go home. They must be taken out of here. Their ancestors miss
them,” Thembekile Sizane told News24 as members of the Site C Action
Committee Against Xenophobia started setting up a public announcement
system at a local taxi rank as part of its awareness programme.

“They are now fighting for land with us,” he said. “And if necessary, I
will be violent” he said.

Public telephone operator Doris Kholose, from the nearby informal
settlement of Harare, told News24 most foreign nationals around her home
had started to leave.

“They must go. There is just too many of them,” she said, adding however
that she did not think violence was necessary.

Kholose said she knew that there were people from African countries
within South Africa that were “doing good things” and added that she was
worried about what would happen to her acquaintances who were foreign
nationals.

SA rich enough for all

“But they are taking our jobs. It’s going to get better after they
leave,” she said echoing sentiments expressed by many.

Cameroonian businessman and post-graduate political studies student
Aabang Ako laid the blame on the government, saying South Africa was
rich enough to accommodate foreign nationals.

“It’s not like South Africa is not a rich country. The question is: How
do we build capacity?” he told News24.

According to Aabang, if South Africa concentrates on getting its
population educated, the scramble for jobs would not be as brutal.

Unfulfilled promises post 1994 democracy were also to blame, he said.

“The State promised too much to people,” he said.

But for a frustrated local vendor at the taxi rank, talk of building
capacity and anti-xenophobia awareness was not important.

“I don’t care about what is happening here,” said the woman who would
not give her name. “All I care about is that these people are going to
set up their things here and make running business hard for me today.”

“I need to make more than this today,” she said waving a lone R20 note.
- News24

href="http://www.news24.com/SouthAfrica/News/Community-fights-xenophobia-20100706">http://www.news24.com/SouthAfrica/News/Com

munity-fights-xenophobia-20100706




SOUTH AFRICA BELONGS TO ALL WHO LIVE IN IT!
ANTI PRIVATISATION FORUM SCHUBART PARK RESIDENTS ASSOCIATION
Public statement 9 July 2010

YOU TOUCH AN IMMIGRANT, YOU TOUCH A COMMUNITY’
ALL-INCLUSIVE COMMUNITY EVENT ON SUNDAY 11th JULY


Schubart Park is a community organisation in the city of Tshwane and an
affiliate of the Anti Privatisation Forum (APF). Immigrants in this
community comprise about 60% of our community members. As a community
and affiliate of the APF we denounce xenophobia in the strongest terms.

We believe that South Africa belongs to those who live in it. There is
no need for us to fight each other. We should stand together and channel
our energies towards fighting inequality and the neo-liberal polices
that have divided us economically and socially. Africa should know no
borders - we are one.

As the poor working class and communities we need to tackle the root
causes of poverty, inequality and lack of service delivery. To do this
requires a radical redistribution of power, assets and opportunities to
break the cycle of poverty and inequality and to give the poor power
over their destiny. Our government’s polices do not allow that to happen
and instead they falsely divide us and create misdirected hatred and
unnecessary conflict. It is these conditions and realities which fuel
xenophobia and provide the space for xenophobic attacks.

In Schubart Park we stand together irrespective of where we come from.
Our slogan is - ‘YOU TOUCH AN IMMIGRANT, YOU TOUCH A COMMUNITY’. In our
community there is, and will be no, space for anyone to ‘touch’ an
immigrant. If this happens, the entire community will deal with the
culprit(s) harshly.

On Sunday 11th July 2010, the final day of the Soccer World Cup, our
community will be staging a mini-soccer tournament that will be made up
of residents from our community. ‘Zimbabwe’ will play against ‘Nigeria’
and ‘South Africa’ will play against a combination of ‘Malawi,
Mozambique, Burundi, Congo and Tanzania’. The winners will play the
finals and losers will battle for 3rd and 4th position.

After the soccer tournament all are welcome to join us in the Schubart
Park hall for a film screening on xenophobia. After the film we will
have a discussion and finally at 19h00, a closing ceremony to our own
xenophobia-free, ‘World Cup’. We will then watch the final game together
in the hall.

OUR PROGRAMME: 13h00 to 13h45 1st soccer match

13h50 to 14h35 2nd match

15h40 to 16h25 (3rd/4th place match)

16h30 to17h15 (1st/2nd match - final)

17h30 to 18h30 - Xenophobia film screening

18h30 to 19h00 - Debates on Xenophobia

For more information contact:

Aubrey Ramotlhale 0737213441

Mashao Chauke 0822126518



The Solidarity Peace Trust urges action to avoid xenophobic violence
Solidarity Peace Trust PRESS STATEMENT 9 July 2010

The Solidarity Peace Trust condemns escalating threats of violence
against foreigners in South Africa as the country’s successful hosting
of the FIFA Soccer World Cup draws to a close.

The Trust supports a number of initiatives in Johannesburg,
KwaZulu-Natal and Cape Town and is concerned that, if South African
authorities fail to take the renewed threats of violence seriously, the
tragic events of 2008 may be repeated.

That shocking wave of anti-foreigner attacks left 62 people dead and
nearly 100 000 displaced. It created terror among the refugee community
and generated negative publicity for South Africa worldwide.

Reports have already been brought to The Trust’s attention of foreigners
being attacked and robbed of their meagre possessions as they leave
areas where their safety is under threat.

The Trust therefore urges the authorities, notably the police, to
respond decisively to the widespread threats and to act immediately
against people or organisations which are fomenting violence, as well as
against all perpetrators of attacks on foreigners.

The Trust calls on churches and community leaders to unite against
xenophobic attacks and to demand that foreigners are given the
protection they deserve. We support the view of the South African
Council of Churches that the threats of xenophobic violence are not
based on unfounded rumours, as is claimed by Police Minister Nathi Mthethwa.

While the lack of political leadership needs to be addressed, it is also
vital that communication between township residents and foreign
nationals is initiated immediately to build understanding and prevent
violent xenophobic incidents.

The Trust appreciates South African government spokesman Themba Maseko’s
reassurances that Cabinet has re-established the inter-ministerial
committee (IMC) to focus on and deal with incidents and threats of
attacks on foreign nationals.

South Africa is a country which prides itself on its deep religious
beliefs and moral principles. The Trust calls on the people of South
Africa to follow the teachings of the Bible regarding the hosting of
foreigners:

"When a stranger resides with you in your land, you shall do him no
wrong … (he) … shall be to you as the native among you, and you shall
love him as yourself …" (Lev 19.33,34)

Signed

Selvan Chetty
Deputy Director
Solidarity Peace Trust



Will Any Players Speak Up?
The World Cup and the Politics of Immigration

JULES BOYKOFF 29 June 2010

The World Cup has produced some mercurial moments, with defending
champions Italy getting the early boot, all African teams but Ghana
vanquished in the first round, and longshots like Japan and Slovakia
advancing to the knockout round. We’ve heaped plenty of scrutiny on
England’s lack of zest, South America’s well-deserved success, and
France’s pathetic implosion. But the tournament has also provided
compelling political undercurrents that deserve our attention.

For starters, several European countries with borderline draconian
immigration policies have benefited massively from immigration. While
the right-wing ratchets up its anti-immigrant rhetoric, it’s immigrants
who have actually helped these countries achieve World Cup success. Take
Germany. Without Mesut Ozil—the son of a Turkish guest worker—whose
left-footed zinger against Ghana vaulted Germany to the second round,
the Germans would not only be manifestly less imaginative but long ago
would’ve been back in Deutschland nursing hefeweizen and watching the
rest of the tournament on television. Brazilian-born Cacau has injected
energy into Germany’s attack after securing citizenship last spring. His
striking partner Miroslav Klose was born in Poland as was Lukas Podolski
— and both were stars in Germany’s 2006 World Cup campaign.

In Switzerland, where leading political party, the Union Démocratique du
Centre, has pushed anti-immigrant policy and tried to outlaw the
construction of minarets, Gelson Fernandes, who was born in Cape Verde,
scored the gamewinner against mighty Spain while Congo-born Blaise Nkufo
has provided a consistent, muscular presence up front. And where would
Portugal be without their skillful Brazilian-born trifecta of Pepe the
enforcer, striker Liedson, and midfield stalwart Deco whose play was
pivotal in getting Portugal to South Africa in the first place? Despite
racist wailings from Arizona, the US squad has also benefited from
immigration. Jozy Altidore—who was vital to US success in this World
Cup—has parents who emigrated from Haiti. Altidore regularly wears a
wristband with a Haitian flag on it to acknowledge his heritage — to be
sure, the wristband also has an American flag on it.

Such immigrant success on the World Cup stage has induced a wave of
Orwellian doublethink, with right-wing hyper-nationalists football
aficionados simultaneously holding two contradictory ideas in their
skulls at the same time. Veins bulging from their necks as they root for
the home team, these fans spout xenophobia by day and don the national
team strip by night.

But European reactionaries and conservatives aren’t the only ones
suffering from doublethink. I suffer from it, too, though in a different
sense. I realize South Africa is getting reamed by FIFA, with record
profit outflows leaving the country and extravagant stadium building
prioritized over the basic needs of the citizenry. FIFA and its boosters
have trotted out the standard-issue, trickle-down claptrap used to
rationalize all international sporting extravaganzas. There’s also the
unsavory practice of corporate sponsors fiendishly enforcing their
commercial pole position, hounding ambush marketers as if they were
abject murderers. All together it’s red-card-abominable and I fully
support the dissidents who are marching against these serious injustices.

And yet my heart can’t but help get fully immersed in the ups and downs
of this World Cup. Sure, I love the game of football, but I also believe
football players have the potential to press us collectively toward a
more just society. Terry Eagleton recently wrote, “for the most part
football these days is the opium of the people, not to speak of their
crack cocaine.” The subtle key to that passage is “for the most part.”
In fact, numerous footballers themselves have sliced against this
zeitgeist, engaging in a wide array of charity work. Holland’s Dirk Kuyt
runs a foundation that makes sport more available to the disabled.
Joseph Yobo of Nigeria has done significant social-uplift work with
youth in the Niger Delta, doling out more than 300 educational
scholarships. Fellow Super Eagle Nwanko Kanu runs a foundation for
people with heart ailments.

But charity work is not the same thing as taking a strong, public stand
on controversial issues like immigration or war, let alone engaging in
social-justice activism. Due to the hyper-commercialized nature of
football, players don’t want to alienate sponsors (existing or
potential), aggravate team owners and administrators, or deflect the
venom of fans who screech that they should just shut up and play. It
makes more sense to go the route of David Beckham, becoming a
one-size-fits-all, polysemic athlete who spectators can read in any way
they wish.

Yet I can’t let go of the glimmering hope that footballers could speak
out. You may be mumbling to yourself that the odds of this happening are
about as good as those of French coach Raymond Domenech being named
World Cup Manager of the Year. But players have moved beyond charity
work in the past, with Didier Drogba employing his football acumen as a
platform to help reconcile political factions in the Ivory Coast.

And sportswriter Dave Zirin is right: “Sport is, at the end of the day,
like a hammer. And you can use a hammer to bash someone over the head or
you could use it to construct something beautiful. It's in the way that
you use it.” In these final days of the World Cup, I’ll be relishing the
luscious mélange of teamwork, individual skill, and artistry that only
football can deliver. But I’m also hoping that a big-name footballer
will brandish his socio-political hammer to build something bigger than
himself and indeed bigger than the FIFA World Cup Trophy.

Jules Boykoff is a former professional soccer player who represented the
US Olympic team in international matches. He is an associate professor
of Political Science at Pacific University in Forest Grove, Oregon. He
can be reached at: boykoff@pacificu.edu

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