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Publication Details

Reference
South African Protest News 22 - 28 February 2010 (2010) South African Protest News 22 - 28 February 2010.  : -.

Summary
ANC shifts blame
SAPA 28 Feb 2010

The African National Congress in Johannesburg has pinned the blame for
most of the service delivery protests in the city on "unscrupulous
elements" within the party.

"While some of the service delivery protests are genuine, most of them
are fuelled by unscrupulous elements who want leadership positions
because of vested and narrow self interests," ANC council chief whip
Nonceba Molwele said on Saturday.

Speaking at the end of a two-day ANC caucus lekgotla in Johannesburg,
she said the party's leadership in the city strongly condemned this
behaviour.

"Those who are behind this unbecoming behaviour will be named and shamed
very soon," Molwele said.

Johannesburg Mayor Amos Masondo said many of the instigators were
leading protests in an attempt to better their chances in the 2011 local
elections.

"We are not opposed to protest, we oppose illegal action and activity.
The reality is there are many challenges faced by municipalities in the
country and some citizens concerns are valid. Government is addressing
issues of roads, health care and education amongst others.

"The causes of protests are complex, but there are some ANC members
leading protests at local level. The destruction of property can not be
allowed and we will nip this kind of behaviour in the bud," he said.

Molwele said the caucus had also vowed that lazy, incompetent and
corrupt public servants would no longer be tolerated.

"The ANC councillors are fully aware of the service delivery challenges
and recommitted themselves towards fulfilling their electoral mandate by
ensuring better and faster services are rendered to all communities in
the various wards and regions.

"[They] resolved they will no longer tolerate public servants and
government officials who are lazy, incompetent and corrupt," she said.

Molwele said there would be a "vigorous assessment" of public
representatives and senior government officials with respect to meeting
service delivery targets in their areas of operation.

She added that the lekgotla had resolved that corruption by public
representatives and government officials with regards to tenders and
procurement, as well as the over pricing of goods and services, would be
dealt with harshly.



Public participation in govt crucial to end service delivery protests'
27 February 2010

Government will have to intensify public participation at all levels in
order to improve service delivery in the country. This emerged during
the two day Local Government Summit held by the Mpumalanga provincial
government and various stakeholders in Secunda.

The aim of the summit was to map the way forward on how to deliver the
best service to South Africans. Findings from the Department of
Cooperative Governance's Ministerial Task Team have revealed that there
is a crisis in local government. Poor performance and lack of capacity
are some of the challenges identified.

The summit however acknowledged that it's not only local government that
has to be blamed for the crisis. “In areas where we were supposed to
build clinics and in areas where we were supposed to build schools,
communities had to confront local authorities, so in that case on our
side we've failed municipalities by not honouring our promises as a
provincial administration,” says Mpumalanga Premier, David Mabuza.

Mpumalanga is one province that has experienced a series of service
delivery protests, with public property severely damaged. The Premier of
the province says a turnaround strategy is already in place. “To turn
the situation around we need to strengthen our engagement with
communities, our IDP forums and our hearings,”says Mabuza.

It remains to be seen whether this summit will accomplish its objective,
that of improving the state of local government and bringing services
closer to the people.



Govt 'won't tolerate' violent protests
SAPA 25 February 2010

Cape Town - The Cabinet reiterated its view on Thursday that violent
protests and general lawlessness will not be tolerated.

Briefing the media on Thursday, following Cabinet's regular fortnightly
meeting on Wednesday, Minister in the Presidency Collins Chabane said
the meeting had discussed the protest action taking place in some parts
of the country.

"And Cabinet wishes to re-assure communities throughout the country that
we have heard your concerns," he said.

Service delivery

The government had already declared 2010 the year of action to deal with
communities' most urgent needs.

"We have a plan to increase the capacity of local government to enable
them to expedite service delivery to all our communities.

"At the meeting, President Jacob Zuma urged ministers to prioritise all
areas that still lack basic services as it is very difficult for
government to justify the tough conditions communities are experiencing.

"However, violent protests and general lawlessness cannot and will not
be tolerated.

"Communities are urged to protest peacefully and within the framework of
the law," Chabane said.
- SAPA



SOLIDARITY MARCH TO BE HELD:
Our Struggle in Balfour is the struggle in all poor communities that
have not benefited from the fruits of this so-called democracy

When: 4 March 2010 at 10:00am
Where: Library Gardens, Corner Fraser & Market Streets in Town and march
to Luthuli House, ANC Head Office

The struggle of Balfour is the struggle of Diepsloot, Soweto, Alexandra,
Kennedy Road, Motse, Sharpville, Orange Farm, across the Vaal and all
poor communities that suffer from government neglect and repression. We
have been pressuring the government for community control over basic
rights such as land, housing, jobs, education, healthcare and sports
facilities. The government has resorted to police repression including
by shooting us with rubber bullets and arresting key leaders. Some of us
have been forced into exile away from our friends and families. But, we
are planning to continue with the struggle. We are saying “Aluta
Continua!” even if they arrest us or kill us. It was happening in the
struggle against apartheid where some were killed or tortured and this
will not stop us today. We call all activists to create a common agenda
that will advance and champion everyone who has been cheated by the
government and excluded from the fruits of democracy.

· When government fails to keep promises, we must force them to listen!

· Working together we become stronger!

· We must have freedom to express ourselves without fear or intimidation
by the police or government authorities!

· Private sector must stop exploiting workers and communities and taking
our resources for their own benefit! Fat cats must not grow rich at the
expense of the majority!

· The majority must benefit from Democracy! Nationalise the wealth of
the country! Free education! Free health! Jobs and Recreation for all!

Contact:

Thabo 078 129 7797
Lifu 072 999 6869
Luke 079 144 4323



82 held as protest turn violent
News 24 25 February 2010

Johannesburg - Eighty-two people were arrested on Thursday afternoon for
public violence during a service delivery protest in Oukasi, Brits,
North West police said.

"Things are pretty tense at the moment, police had to earlier fire
rubber bullets at the protesters after they tried to gain forceful entry
into a municipal building," Captain Adele Myburgh said.

Six people were injured during the incident and were taken to hospital
for minor bruises.

She said three houses were also damaged when they were stoned.

"One of the houses belongs to the mayor of Brits, and the other two to
policemen. They keep on regrouping."

Residents barricade townships

The residents were complaining about the quality of water in the
Madibeng municipality.

Earlier on Thursday, about 1 500 protesters barricaded the entrance to
the township with stones and burning tyres and later moved to the
municipal offices. Beeld newspaper reported on Tuesday that the
municipality had warned residents to boil their tap water as it had been
contaminated.

The protesters tried to join members of the SA Municipal Workers' Union
(Samwu) who were marching to the municipal building to demand that Mayor
Sophie Molokoane-Machika, who is also the deputy chair of the SA Local
Government Association, be fired.

"The first group did not have a permit to protest and had to be
dispersed, while Samwu was allowed to deliver its memorandum to the
municipality," said Myburgh.

Outsourcing
Samwu leader Jerry Mokwena said workers were unhappy about the
appointment of companies to provide services which municipal workers
were rendering.

"How can the municipality appoint a service provider to cut grass while
municipal workers are performing that task?

"We want the mayor to be fired for political interference in the
administration of the municipality."

Municipal spokesperson Patrick Morathi said the municipality would
respond to the issues raised in the memorandum in due course.



Scores arrested in N West service delivery protest
SABC 25 February 2010

Scores of people have been arrested during violent service delivery
protests in Brits in the North West. Some of the protestors were badly
injured when police fired rubber bullets to disperse the residents who
had tried to storm municipal buildings.

Residents says they are angry over bad water quality in the area. Their
protest action follows a requests by the municipality to residents to
boil the polluted water. The Madibeng Municipality however insists that
its drinking water is clean.

“After the police began to negotiate with people they started to be
calmer. They went into a hall and spoke further with the police – the
situation now remains calm,” says police spokesperson, Adele Myburg.

Myburg says about 1 500 protesters barricaded the entrance to the
township with stones and burning tyres from 6am and later moved to the
municipal offices.

The protesters tried to join members of the South African Municipal
Workers Union (Samwu) who were also marching to the municipal building
to demand that mayor Sophie Molokoane-Machika, who is also the deputy
chair of the SA Local Government Association, be fired.

Meanwhile, in the midst of violent protests that have erupted throughout
the country, Cabinet reiterated its view today that violent protests and
general lawlessness will not be tolerated.

Briefing the media, following Cabinet's regular fortnightly meeting
yesterday, Minister in the Presidency Collins Chabane said the meeting
had discussed the protest action taking place in some parts of the
country. – Additional reporting by Sapa



Orange Farm strikes 'frustating'
Lettie (MyNews24) 24 February 2010

I am deeply frustrated by the service delivery strikes in my area -
South Johannesburg, Orange Farm. I have suffered deeply in the past two
days because the Golden highway was blocked on Monday and we had to take
the toll gate route and then this morning (24/02) there's another crazy
bunch blocking the Palm Drive Road, and therefore preventing my bus from
coming into our area.

This means that once again we had to make other means to travel to work
and if you're working in Midrand, it's very difficult to get here by
public transport because of the heave traffic on the N1 and the
Allendale off ramp.

I just don't understand why these hooligans won't stop. Firstly I would
like to put across the point that the majority of these people putting
up the strike are not working. Mostly by choice and others because of
other reasons, meaning they have nothing to loose if they’re disrupting
public routes and transport.

Some have never held down a job at all, and I wonder if you're not
willing to contribute to the economy of the country, where do you get
the guts to demand for free everything. I mean they want everything for
free, water, electricity, and housing. They're just not willing to do
anything for themselves.

South Africans, like the ones in my area, are spoilt. Next thing they
will be demanding for free cars. Well some of them I guess are already
doing that by taking from those who were willing to go through the
trouble of saving and buying cars by stealing from them.

What kind of society is this government creating? People should be
encouraged to uplift themselves and get their own things, not by force
or looting.

These people really believe that the government owes them. Whose tax is
paying for these things their demanding for? I mean if you haven't
worked a day in your life and you want everything to be hand delivered
to you what are you thinking? It really makes me angry!

We work hard and we don't demand. We learned that if you want anything
in life, you have to work for it. I'm 21 and I have a job immediately
after high school to help me pay for my fees to further my education.
Some people just don't want to work.

I understand that there isn't enough jobs in the country but let's face
it, if you do not finish even high school, and then start looking for a
job in your mid-twenties who do you think is going to higher you? What
skills are you going to bring to any organisation?

I think it's time my people were given the facts and did something about
it instead of just demanding one way. The Freedom Charter was meant for
the good of the people, however we're now creating protest monsters that
cannot do anything other than protest and not have the ability to do
things for themselves.

The government should also start singing a different tune; one that
encourages hard work, education and people should take accountability
for their situations. People should be told that through hard work there
is reward. If you're going to sit at home and hang out in the corner all
day and not take control of your situation, then you do not even deserve
that mahala house you're demanding!



Sharpeville erupts
Poloko Tau and Sapa 24 February 2010

Abram Mokoena has seen it all before. He was 14 at the time of the
Sharpeville massacre, but yesterday, 50 years later, he was caught again
between flying bullets and the violence that protest can trigger.

"I don't know what hit me that day as I was fleeing to the police station.

"Just like today, people were running in all directions and dying like
flies," he said.

Yesterday, several protesting residents were injured by rubber bullets
and 14 were arrested for public violence and damage to police vehicles.

The chaos erupted after a fiery meeting at the George Thabe stadium.

A crowd of about 2 000 people ran towards the Boxer supermarket and
started stoning it, and police opened fire with rubber bullets.

This led to running battles between protesters and police.

Protesters also burnt tyres and blocked off Seeiso Street and the Vuka
section of the township. A bus picking up passengers was stoned as it
navigated its way through the area. One passenger was injured.

As the battles with the police continued, residents hurriedly dispersed
and fled in all directions.

Some fell while others managed to jump safely over fences and escape the
volleys of rubber bullets.

But yesterday's protests weren't aimed at getting rid of Afrikaans from
schools - they were aimed at "asking those governing us to adhere to
their 15-year-old promises".

Concerned residents said the promises included tarred roads, houses,
employment opportunities and youth empowerment projects.

"For a long time we watched from the sidelines while people from Soweto
and other outlying places managed projects in Sharpeville while people
from here continue to be unemployed," residents' leader Jabu Makhanye
said at the meeting.

"The next we see of government people is when they come here and throw
festivities in the name of the fallen heroes of the Sharpeville massacre
while people around here starve."

Makhanye said the residents would boycott this year's Sharpeville
massacre events if their grievances were not seriously considered and
acted upon.

"We're an angry community, tired of understanding all the time.

"We say Sharpeville youth deserve a chance to manage projects here, be
employed and make some money," he told residents.

Makhanye added that R22-million had supposedly been used to renovate the
stadium, but there was nothing to show for it.

"Our council is corrupt and we want them to step down," he said to cheers.

Lebogang Seale and Kim Tshukulu

Holding her baby firmly in her arms, Grace Mhlongo cried hysterically as
she ran out of her store. Just moments before, she had been busy in her
prosperous spaza shop in the densely populated Orange Farm's Drieziek
Extension 3.

That was until a rampaging mob targeted her store, tore down its walls
of corrugated iron sheets and wood, before looting her stock.

Shortly before 8am yesterday, a mob of chanting residents from Extension
3 surged towards the Golden Highway and again barricaded the busy road
with burning tyres, rocks, logs and rubble.

The police reacted by firing stun grenades, rubber bullets and teargas
to disperse the mob.

When the mob turned on Mhlongo's store, they started by throwing stones
at the shop.

Within a few minutes, they had stormed into her store and scrambled for
whatever goods they could find.

Mhlongo's frantic wails could be heard from afar.

"My money! All my stock! What have I done wrong? Why?" she asked.

Yesterday marked day two of service delivery protests in Orange Farm,
where residents say they do not have proper sanitation, housing and
electricity.

In response to the protests, a delegation from the Joburg mayor's
office, led by mayoral committee member for housing and acting mayor
Ruby Mathang, visited the township.

Residents grudgingly accepted the delegation's undertaking that the
laying of sewerage pipes - which had been their core demand - would
resume today, after it was halted in December because of the alleged
non-payment of funds to the contractor.

After the meeting, an uneasy calm settled over the area as residents
surveyed the damage to property.

In total, police arrested 50 people, all of whom are facing charges of
public violence and malicious damage to property. They will appear in
court soon.

* This article was originally published on page 5 of The Star on
February 24, 2010



House torched in Sharpeville
Smanga Kumalo (Sowetan) 25 February 2010

THE home of a municipal employee in Sharpeville on the Vaal has been set
alight.

A service delivery protest started in the township on Tuesday .

Sello Maetso’s home was torched by a group of men early yesterday morning.

His elder brother Toko said Maetso, who is employed as a coordinator in
the office of Sedibeng district municipality mayor Simon Mofokeng, was
not at home at the time .

“I was sleeping when I heard a bang on the window, a minute later I
smelled smoke and I went to investigate,” Toko said.

“I saw a big flame inside the house and screamed for help. Fortunately
people rescued me.”

He said he did not understand why they burnt his parent’s house because
Maetso is not a councillor.

“I do not know whether the incident is linked to the protest,” he said.

He said Mofokeng visited the family yesterday .

Police Superintended Maria Mazibuko said five people have been arrested
in connection with the fire .

Meanwhile, Sapa reports that the situation was tense in Sharpeville as
community leaders met ward councillors under police supervision yesterday.

“There were no violent incidents reported today [Wednesday] but the
situation is still very tense, ” said Captain Julia Klaasen.



Tshwane refuse lies uncollected
Liezl Thom (Eyewitness News) 24 February 2010

Refuse collection has ground to a halt again in Tshwane.

Mayor Gwen Ramokgopa gave residents the assurance in January that labour
issues with refuse removal workers had been resolved and that there
would be no further strikes.

It is understood workers downed tools on Wednesday to protest against
the slow pace of permanent appointments.

A drive through the capital is all it takes to realise that refuse
collectors are not on their posts.

Overflowing rubbish bins and bags crammed with garbage line the streets
of the city centre while several residents have reported their waste has
not been collected.

Workers downed tools for the third time in as many months.

They are unhappy many of them have still not been appointed permanently
by the Tshwane Metro Council despite being promised direct employment.
(Edited by Deshnee Subramany)



Joburg taxi slow-down
Rahima Essop and JP du Plessis (Eyewitness News) 25 February 2010

Johannesburg commuters could be stranded on Thursday morning, despite
the suspension of a planned taxi strike.

Operators were unhappy with the implementation of the next phase of the
Bus Rapid Transit system.

Meetings between industry role-players were held on Wednesday night and
ended in the early hours of Thursday morning.

A decision was taken to suspend the stay away pending further talks with
city officials and national government.

"We agreed that we should suspend the stay-away," said the United Taxi
Association Forum's Ralph Jones.

He said the message might not have filtered down to all drivers, who may
think the strike was still on.

"There will be a go-slow but hopefully as the day progresses it will be
back to normal," said Jones.

"I have just passed Orlando and Diepkloof, people are looking for lifts
because there are no taxis," said a Soweto resident.

Meanwhile, The Gauteng Community Safety Department has ordered police to
take the necessary action to stop protestors from destroying public
property.

Khabisi Mosunkutu's office said it respects the right to protest but
anyone found breaking the law will be arrested and charged.

"It makes absolutely no sense to protest for so-called service delivery
and at the same time destroy public property and public infrastructure,
yet there is a complaint of service delivery," said Department of
Safety's Sizwe Matshikize.



Union gives ultimatum to Ekurhuleni
Katlego Moeng, Sowetan, 24 February 2010

THE South African Municipal Workers Union says it will bring services to
a standstill next month if Ekurhuleni metro refuses to meet its demands.

About 1000 members of Cosatu-affiliated union Samwu marched in
Germiston, yesterday, accusing the municipality of reneging on
agreements signed in June last year .

In its memorandum the union demands that “the mayoral committee and
mayor resign, the City Manager and directors be suspended pending a full
investigation into their role on fruitless expenditure and an agreed
employee grading system be implemented by the end of March”.

Metro-employed HIV-Aids coordinator Seage Matenci, who does outreach and
education work, said he lacks the basic tools to execute his job.

“On the municipal grading system, I’m a level 9 employee. According to
the agreement I should now be a level 6 employee with a decent living
wage and access to a car allowance that is needed to do my job,” Matenci
said.

Samwu Ekurhuleni branch secretary Koena Ramotlou said: “You will find
that refuse removal in black communities is done by private companies
while in towns of white communities it is done by permanent municipal
employees.

“This outsourcing of municipal services disempowers the municipality to
account to communities because they have to first ask the service
provider before they provide answers to the community. Councillors are
then faced with angry community members in the ward public meetings,”
Ramotlou said.

He said Cosatu will discuss a way forward on the grievances in a
provincial executive council meeting before the end of the week.

Ekurhuleni spokesperson Zweli Dlamini said a petitions and memorandums
committee will look at the Samwu’s grievances and respond.
http://www.sowetan.co.za/News/Article.aspx?id=1117238



Protests flare-up in Mpumalanga
SABC 24 February 2010

Over 10 000 residents from various areas in the Steve Tshwete
Municipality, have gathered in protest outside the Middleburg municipal
offices in Mpumalanga. Residents are protesting against what they call a
lack of service delivery.

They are accusing Mayor Mantlhakeng Mahlangu of using dictatorship to
run the municipality. They also accuse Mahlangu of changing street names
without any consultation, as well as using her office to fight party
political battles.

According to community spokesperson Ziphelo Motsepe, residents have sent
a delegation to the Mayor's office several times to address such issues.
However, they say they have received no co-operation. Issues of land
distribution have also been cited in their grievances, as well as
alleged unfair dismissal of municipal workers.

A heavily armed police contingent is monitoring the situation. Motsepe
says they will shortly be handing over a memorandum of demands to the
Mayor. Earlier, residents blockaded roads with stones as they demanded
the removal of the Mayor. They are also demanding flushing toilets,
among other things. Community members say they have been waiting for the
toilets for more than four years.

Commuters were this morning left stranded as there were no taxis or busses.



Cops open fire as residents riot
Canaan Mdletshe 24 February 2010

Corruption and nepotism blamed for Dundee protest

TEN police vans were damaged when incensed S¡¯bongile township residents
in Dundee, northern KwaZulu- Natal, went on the rampage.

Disgruntled youths trashed the township, complaining about corruption
and nepotism. They blocked roads with burning tyres, emptied rubbish
bins, and pelted police with stones. Police in return fired rubber
bullets to disperse them. The protestors also smashed the windows of a
house belonging to former mayor Thandeka Nukani.

Police spokesperson Phindile Radebe said: ¡°Trouble started on Monday
when residents ran amok. Nine police vans were damaged and today
(yesterday) one was damaged. A police officer was seriously injured and
38 people were arrested.

¡°Those arrested are expected to appear in court today on charges of
public violence.¡±

The situation had reporte dly been tense since last week.

A community meeting was held last Friday at which a decision to protest
outside the eNdumeni municipal offices was taken. On Monday a group of
young people, allegedly from the ANC Youth League, IFP Youth Brigade,
NGOs and church-based organisations, decided to protest.

One of the leaders, Siyabonga Mahlaba, said their grievances were about
corruption, nepotism and the municipality¡¯s failure to submit financial
reports to the auditor-general for two consecutive years.

¡°Also, we have concerns about the way low-cost houses are being
distributed,¡± he said.

Mahlaba also claimed that the same companies were getting contracts and
that there was R50000 allocated to youth development and young people¡¯s
business, but instead the money had been deposited into the personal
account of one of the municipal officials.

¡°We have a situation where you find seven family members and the
extended family members of a senior official from the technical services
(parks and garden) and finance departments employed without the posts
being advertised,¡± he said.

Sanco regional chairperson Mzwakhe Sithebe said three previous marches
had not yielded any positive results.

¡°Corruption continues. It has cost the lives of two senior leaders in
the area,¡± he said.

¡°Grishen Bujram (ANC councillor) and Peter Nxele (IFP councillor) were
permanently removed for raising issues of corruption.¡±

Municipal manager David Cebekhulu said the municipality was willing to
address the concerns of residents ¡°if they were approached¡±.



Cops fire on Sharpeville, Orange Farm protesters


Angry residents are sick and tired of being understanding

ABRAM Mokoena has seen it all before. He was 14 at the time of the
Sharpeville massacre, but yesterday, 50 years later, he was caught again
between flying bullets and the violence that protest can trigger.

"I don't know what hit me that day as I was fleeing to the police station.

"Just like today, people were running in all directions and dying like
flies," he said.

Yesterday, several protesting residents were injured by rubber bullets
and 14 were arrested for public violence and damage to police vehicles.

The chaos erupted after a fiery meeting at the George Thabe stadium.

A crowd of about 2 000 people ran towards the Boxer supermarket and
started stoning it, and police opened fire with rubber bullets.

This led to running battles between protesters and police.

Protesters also burnt tyres and blocked off Seeiso Street and the Vuka
section of the township. A bus picking up passengers was stoned as it
navigated its way through the area. One passenger was injured.

As the battles with the police continued, residents hurriedly dispersed
and fled in all directions.

Some fell while others managed to jump safely over fences and escape the
volleys of rubber bullets.

But yesterday's protests weren't aimed at getting rid of Afrikaans from
schools - they were aimed at "asking those governing us to adhere to
their 15-year-old promises".

Concerned residents said the promises included tarred roads, houses,
employment opportunities and youth empowerment projects.

"For a long time we watched from the sidelines while people from Soweto
and other outlying places managed projects in Sharpeville while people
from here continue to be unemployed," residents' leader Jabu Makhanye
said at the meeting.

"The next we see of government people is when they come here and throw
festivities in the name of the fallen heroes of the Sharpeville massacre
while people around here starve."

Makhanye said the residents would boycott this year's Sharpeville
massacre events if their grievances were not seriously considered and
acted upon.

"We're an angry community, tired of understanding all the time.

"We say Sharpeville youth deserve a chance to manage projects here, be
employed and make some money," he told residents.

Makhanye added that R22 million had supposedly been used to renovate the
stadium, but there was nothing to show for it.

"Our council is corrupt and we want them to step down," he said to cheers.



Sharpeville tense as police protect councillors at meeting
SAPA 24 February 2010

Police believed the cause of the protest was poor service delivery.

The situation is tense in Sharpeville as community leaders meet ward
councillors under police supervision.

"There were no violent incidents reported today [Wednesday] but the
situation is still very tense. Police are monitoring the area," said
Captain Julia Klaasen.

A councillor's house and car were set alight by angry protesters around
11pm on Tuesday. No one was arrested in connection with the incident.

Residents started protesting on Tuesday morning, barricading roads in
the area.

They burned tyres and blocked off Seifo Street and the Vuka section of
the township. A bus picking up passengers was stoned as it navigated its
way through the area, injuring one passenger.

On Tuesday, community leaders and residents gathered at the Sharpeville
Stadium to meet government officials "under the supervision and control"
of the police.



Lebogang Seale And Kim Tshukulu
Poloko Tau and (Sapa, The Star) 24 February 2010

HOLDING her baby firmly in her arms, Grace Mhlongo cried hysterically as
she ran out of her store. Just moments before, she had been busy in her
prosperous spaza shop in the densely populated Orange Farm's Drieziek
Extension 3.

That was until a rampaging mob targeted her store, tore down its walls
of corrugated iron sheets and wood, before looting her stock.

Shortly before 8am yesterday, a mob of chanting residents from Extension
3 surged towards the Golden Highway and again barricaded the busy road
with burning tyres, rocks, logs and rubble.

The police reacted by firing stun grenades, rubber bullets and teargas
to disperse the mob.

When the mob turned on Mhlongo's store, they started by throwing stones
at the shop.

Within a few minutes, they had stormed into her store and scrambled for
whatever goods they could find.

Mhlongo's frantic wails could be heard from afar.

"My money! All my stock! What have I done wrong? Why?" she asked.

Yesterday marked day two of service delivery protests in Orange Farm,
where residents say they do not have proper sanitation, housing and
electricity.

In response to the protests, a delegation from the Joburg mayor's
office, led by mayoral committee member for housing and acting mayor
Ruby Mathang, visited the township.

Residents grudgingly accepted the delegation's undertaking that the
laying of sewerage pipes - which had been their core demand - would
resume today, after it was halted in December because of the alleged
non-payment of funds to the contractor.

After the meeting, an uneasy calm settled over the area as residents
surveyed the damage to property.

In total, police arrested 50 people, all of whom are facing charges of
public violence and malicious damage to property. They will appear in
court soon.



Councillor's house set alight
SAPA 24 February 2010

Johannesburg - A councillor's house and car were set alight by angry
protesters at Sharpeville, Johannesburg police said on Wednesday.

Captain Julia Klaasen said the incident happened at around 23:00 on Tuesday.

No one was arrested in connection with the incident and protesters had
since dispersed.

Residents started protesting on Tuesday morning, barricading roads in
the area.

Bus stoned

They burned tyres and blocked off Seifo Street and the Vuka section of
the township. A bus picking up passengers was stoned as it navigated its
way through the area, injuring one passenger.

She was taken to a nearby hospital for treatment.

Police believed the cause of the protest was poor service delivery.

Klaasen said police would monitor the area on Wednesday.

On Tuesday, community leaders and residents gathered at Sharpeville
Stadium to meet government officials "under the supervision and control"
of the police.
- SAPA



Promises, anger as residents demand better services
Rahima Essop 24 February 2010

Acting Johannesburg Mayor Ruby Mathang on Tuesday vowed contractors will
be in Orange Farm on Wednesday, to fix the community¡¯s sewerage woes.

It followed two days of violent protests which came to a head on Tuesday.

Mathang spoke to residents and promised action.

Residents went on the rampage for a second day on Tuesday prompting
running battles with police.

¡°If you don¡¯t protest no-one will feel the heat,¡± said a resident.

The protests also disrupted schooling.

A delegation from the City of Johannesburg addressed the community
during an impromptu meeting on the Golden Highway promising residents
they will see change as early as Wednesday.



Rubber bullets fired as Orange Farm protest turns violent
PULENG MASHABANE 23 February 2010

JOHANNESBURG - Police fired rubber bullets to disperse an Orange Farm
protest that was getting violent.

The protest which entered it¡¯s second day yesterday, began at around
8am, and the Golden Highway which protesters barricaded with rocks, tree
trunks and burnt tyres was closed as a result.

Numerous shops, most owned by foreigners, were looted, at least four
schools in various sections of Orange Farm were closed and the traffic
flow was disrupted during a service delivery protest in Orange Farm
yesterday.

It is alleged some teachers failed to reach their work place as the road
was closed by protesters who were allegedly threatening to burn every
vehicle that drove past.

Grace Mhlongo, whose shop was looted yesterday, said she was in the shop
when the crowd opened the main door and took all the money she had in
the till as well as some groceries, then fled.

A 14-year-old boy who was apparently among the crowd that looted the
shop was rescued by the police from a crowd of community members wanting
to discipline him themselves.

The disgruntled community members were crying out that the people they
put in power (by voting for them) forgot completely about them and the
promises they made.



Golden highway blocked due to protest
Sapa 23 February 2010

JOHANNESBURG - Protests against poor service delivery continued along
the Golden Highway on Tuesday with police closing the road and then
re-opening it shortly after 10am, Johannesburg metro police said.

Chief Superintendent Wayne Minnaar said the Golden Highway had again
been closed after protesters burned tyres and blocked the road with rocks.

While the road was later re-opened, he advised motorists to use the N1
as an alternative route.

Police were keeping a close eye on the situation where angry residents
pelted police with stones and burnt tyres on Monday.

Protesting Orange Farm residents began demonstrating at around 1am on
Monday and around 3pm the 1500 residents started pelting police with
stones and damaging their vans in the process.

Police retaliated by firing teargas and rubber bullets and arrested 30
people for public violence.

A metro police official was sent to Lenmed hospital in Lenasia, south of
Johannesburg after he was injured on his leg during the protest.

-Sapa



'We have lost hope of service delivery'
Sapa 23 February 2010

* Sharpville tense after protest
* Heavy police presence in Orange Farm
* Shops looted in Orange Farm protest

The ANC on Tuesday condemned violent service delivery protests that left
two people, including a metro police officer, injured in Orange Farm and
Sharpeville.

"We request people to exercise patience and restraint. In as much as the
ANC is tolerant to the legitimate protest action, violence will not
bring development," said spokesman Dumisa Ntuli in a statement.

"It is our firm view that protesters must refrain from violent conduct,"

He urged residents to "exercise patience and optimism" as the government
will "respond appropriately to specific issues of development which gave
rise to the protest".

"The ANC is prepared to listen, it is fair to mention that many meetings
have been called and people have been informed of the integrated phases
of development in the area [Orange Farm].

"The ANC will continue to engage the community to find appropriate
solutions to the current problems with regard to issues of development,"
Ntuli said.

A "lot of development" was taking place in Orange Farm, where residents
took to the streets on Monday and Tuesday to protest against poor
housing construction and lack of other basic amenities.

Community spokesman Bricks Moloko said: "People are angry, people are
tired, we have lost hope of service delivery.

"We are told that we need to give the government a chance and each time
they change the president we are told to give him a chance," said
Moloko, of the Orange Farm Water Crisis Committee on Monday.

Although the situation had calmed down in the area on Tuesday afternoon,
residents had earlier gone on the rampage in Extensions Seven and Eight,
ordering foreign nationals out of their stores and taking their goods,
said Inspector Mzimkhulu Mthimkulu.

Community leaders met government officials at 1pm.

On Monday, residents stoned the police, damaging their vans, and burnt
tyres on the Golden Highway, affecting traffic flow.

Police retaliated, firing rubber bullets and teargas before arresting 30
people for public violence.

Sharpeville residents started their protest on Tuesday morning, using
burning tyres and "anything they could find" to barricade roads, said
Superintendent Nthabiseng Mazibuko.

A woman was injured when a bus picking up passengers was stoned as it
made its way through the area on Tuesday morning. She was taken to a
nearby hospital for treatment.

The situation had calmed down in the afternoon but was still tense
following a meeting between residents and government officials at the
Sharpeville stadium.

Poor service delivery was behind protests there, and Ntuli said the
government was "trying by all means to resolve the situation there". - Sapa



Another violent protest erupts in Sharpville
SABC 23 February 2010

Members of the South African Police Service had their hands full today
as more violent protests erupted in Sharpville on the Vaal . Other
protest in Orange Farm in southern Johannesburg are still ongoing.
Residents in both areas are calling for the resignation of council
leaders accusing them of corruption and poor service delivery.

The Sharpville protest comes after Gauteng Premier, Nomvula Mokonyane
promised to get to the bottom of service delivery protests. The
township, steeped in its struggle history, today erupted in chaos.

Residents are calling for the Emfuleni and Sedibeng mayors to resign and
have vowed to disrupt next month¡¯s Human Rights Day celebrations - the
day the Sharpeville massacre is commemorated.

¡°We have tried several times to speak to talk to the council and on that
basis we therefore felt that there is nothing else we can do except to
mobilise the people. Maybe this is the language the council will
understand,¡± says Sharpville community leader, Vincent Kutuoane.

Protestors are also up in arms over news that more money will be used to
upgrade the George Thabe Stadium. The stadium underwent a R22 million
facelift a mere four years ago.

Late last year, Co-operative Governance Minister Sicelo Shiceka said
service delivery protests must be completely eliminated by 2014. "We
must respond to issues before people go to the streets," Shiceka told a
local government indaba in Boksburg, which included municipal and
provincial government representatives.

He said he wanted a "responsive, efficient, effective and accountable"
local government.

South Africa was rocked by a wave of service delivery protests around
the country, many of which turned violent. Communities largely called
for the removal of councillors due to a track record of poor service
delivery.
Sharpeville arrests:



Highway not so golden
Katlego Moeng and Sapa 23 February 2010

Police battle to contain service delivery protesters

THE Golden Highway was last night closed due to violent protests that
left a Johannesburg metro policeman injured and police vans damaged in
Orange Farm, a metro police spokesman said.

Chief Superintendent Wayne Minnaar said the road would remain closed
between Palmsprings and the first railway bridge in Orange Farm as
residents continued to burn tyres and pelt police officers with stones
last night.

"The situation remains tense and is being monitored. Motorists are
advised to use the N1 as an alternative route," he said.

He said the injured officer was "stitched up on one of his legs" at the
Lenmed hospital in Lenasia, south of Johannesburg.

The protesters demanded the local councillor resign ¨C immediately.

While Gauteng premier Nomvula Mokonyane was busy delivering her State of
the Province Address in the city centre, Drieziek units 1, 7 and 8
residents blockaded the highway with rocks, rubble and burning tyres.

¡°Road constructions start but then stop midway, leaving many areas
inaccessible. We don¡¯t have sewer pipes and our street lights don¡¯t
work,¡± said community leader Sonto Makhobela.

She said street lights were erected just before elections last year and
¡°officials started looking busy, taking soil samples for studies for
development, but after the elections there has been no movement. The
lights are now off¡±.

¡°Children are also involved in this protest because they tired of using
pits for toilets,¡± said local residents Lungile Maphanga and Salamina
Motsoagae.

Police had their hands full trying to control the mob and were
constantly pelted with stones as they fired rubber bullets to disperse
the protesters.

Police spokesperson Captain Johannes Motsiri said that by 5.30pm 88
people had been arrested.



Police arrest 13 Sharpville protesters
Sapa 23 February 2010

The 13 have been arrested for public violence and malicious damage to
property, said Superintendent Nthabiseng Mazibuko.

Mazibuko said the situation in Sharpeville was calmer on Tuesday evening
following violent protests earlier in the day.

Mazibuko said protesting residents had dispersed but police would be
monitoring the situation throughout the night.

Police believed poor service delivery was the cause of the protest.

A woman was injured when a bus picking up passengers was stoned as it
made its way through the area on Tuesday morning. She was taken to a
nearby hospital for treatment.

Mazibuko said residents had used ¡°anything they could find¡±, including
burning tyres, to barricade roads.

Later in the morning, community leaders and residents gathered at the
Sharpeville stadium to meet government officials ¡°under the supervision
and control¡± of the police, Mazibuko said.

In Orange Farm, the situation was calm as community leaders met
government officials at 1pm, said Inspector Mzimkhulu Mthumkulu.

He said Orange Farm residents went on the rampage in Extensions Seven
and Eight on Tuesday, ordering foreign nationals out of their stores
then taking their goods.

¡°Police fired rubber bullets to disperse the mob and restore order,¡± he
said.

On Monday, residents stoned the police, damaging their vans, and burnt
tyres in the area. Police retaliated, firing rubber bullets and teargas
before arresting 30 people for public violence.



Cape Zimbabweans scared
Nikita Sylvester (Staff Reporter) 24 February 2010

Zimbabweans living in a temporary refugee camp in De Doorns stayed away
from work yesterday after being frightened by rumours of a protest by
locals.

The protest did not happen, but the Zimbabweans - who have been living
in makeshift tents on a rugby field since November - said they were
taking no chances and would not go to work.

In November, local residents drove scores of Zimbabweans out of their
homes as tensions around working conditions on De Doorns farms spilled over.

Zimbabwean farmworkers in the camp said yesterday they had no idea why
locals wanted to fight with them.
Continues Below ¡ý

A 25-year-old married mother of a two-year-old boy said she was too
scared to go to work at a nearby farm. At the end of the season, she
said, she would return to Zimbabwe with her family.

Wendy Pekeur, secretary general of Sikula Sonke, an organisation
representing the interests of farm labourers, said she and other members
of the organisation first heard about the planned march while visiting
locals in Stofland last weekend.

She said a white bakkie had been seen driving around with a man on the
back making announcements with a loudhailer.

He had announced a local ANC meeting, to which residents were told they
should bring their identity documents, and that they were to march on
the refugee camp yesterday.

"He said they would be demand that the Zimbabweans leave the country,"
Pekeur said.

She could not identify the man with the loudhailer.

Breede Valley mayor Charles Ntsomi said he was aware of the announcement
made in Stofland on Saturday afternoon, but that after investigating
could confirm that the only announcement was about an ANC annual meeting
to take place the following afternoon.

"I don't know why people are starting rumours," he said, adding that
they wanted the Zimbabweans to live normal lives.

De Doorns police were also aware of the rumours, but said no protest
march had taken place.



UCT takes to the streets to protest murders
mycapetown.co.za 24 February 2010

The memorial service hosted for Dominic ¡®Dom¡¯ Giddy at UCT today ¨C
drawing hundreds of staff and students ¨C hit many emotive notes. On the
one hand were the touching expressions of love, sorrow and even
forgiveness from family and friends of the student killed in Observatory
on 13 February. On the other, anger and frustration from UCT
vice-chancellor, Dr Max Price, who did not mince his words, calling for
action from both civil society and, more pointedly, from the state.

¡°Our lives are staler without his indiscriminate kindness and warmth,¡±
said friend Matt Alves. ¡°Speechless,¡± added father Patrick Giddy, ¡°we
stood on Muizenberg beach Saturday night last, family and friends, in a
circle of love, in tribute to a prophet of gentleness.¡±

In her message, sister Isabelle, added: ¡°I¡¯m sad that my brother was
taken away from me, from us, so mercilessly.¡±

But, as Price noted in his opening address, the occasion was one for
mourning, for dealing with anger and loss, but also to protest the lack
of political will to tackle crime head-on. No one has yet been arrested
for Giddy¡¯s murder, or for that of student Benny Pakiso Moqobane and
staff members Mike Larkin and Kevin Rochford.

¡°Justice has not been done, and has not seen to be done,¡± said Price.
¡°It is a system that has failed us, and those in authority in that
system must hear our message ¨C head of the investigations, you have
failed us; councillor for the area, you have failed us; minister of
safety and security, you have failed; president of the country, you have
failed us.¡±

If the country can muster its talent and resources to stage a soccer
World Cup, how can it not bring criminals to book, Price asked? Should
politicians show the will to curb crime, it will have the support of its
citizens, but ¨C in a stiff rebuke ¨C Price reminded politicians that
people will not remain quiet should the state not live up to its duties.

¡°If you are flippant with our lives, as you have been, we will object,¡±
he said. ¡°We will show the middle finger at your convoy, and we will
vote you out. We say, enough.¡±

It was a sentiment mirrored by Sizwe Mpofu-Walsh, president of the
Students¡¯ Representative Council, who also called on UCT to take action
as a community.

¡°Quite frankly, students, we¡¯ve come to the point in our society where
unless we start coming up with solutions, unless we gather here in the
numbers that we¡¯ve gathered here today, unless we start telling
politicians what to do and stop waiting for them to tell us what to do,
unless we do that, students, then this problem is going to continue, and
many more of us are going to be innocently murdered.¡±

Following the memorial service, staff and students marched from the
university¡¯s upper campus into Mowbray, Observatory and Rondebosch,
donning T-shirts and bearing placards that echoed the day¡¯s message: ¡°We
say: Enough.¡± and ¡°How Many More?¡±.

Some students said they were still reeling from the murder.

¡°I¡¯m not sure what to do. Dom was in res with me. He was a part of us,¡±
said third-year student Tapiwa Nyabadza.

Others were willing to take the lead to change things.

¡°We have marched before,¡± said one student, ¡°and the more we do so, the
bigger the difference we can make.



No consultation, traders claim
24 February 2010

"There is no consultation taking place from the City or Intersite
regarding matters where the traders are concerned". This was the word
from Riedwaan Charles, the interim chairman of the Western Cape Informal
Traders Coalition. According to Charles, his organization has no been
called in to help the station deck and lower deck traders in their
plight. This come after the informal traders on the station deck was
asked to move from their current area of trade as they city would be
revamping the area. To date those traders have still not been moved to a
new location with the Cape Town area.

On Tuesday morning about 100 informal traders took to the streets of
Cape Town in protest against the by law which was implemented as well as
the new permit system which has been introduced by the City. According
to Charles, the traders currently have no say in where they would like
to be moved to.

"These marches are based on those grounds. Even the fruit traders at the
Epping Market are being affected by the evictions of the informal
traders. We as the coalition are bringing forward all traders in the CBD
area and we are in support of the traders on the top station deck and
lower station deck," he said.

Poor communication
He explained that various issues would be highlighted in the memorandum
which was handed over to the City's Paul Williamson. "The most
outstanding issue would be is the City's lack of communication with the
traders as well as the fact that traders are not part of the decision
making process," said Charles.

Charles said they are unemployed people who have tried to create jobs
for themselves, but trade has being made difficult for the traders
because of the new by-law. "We are unemployed people who have tried to
create jobs for ourselves and the City has helped in this regard by
giving us the space to work before, but now with the FIFA 2010 world
cup, it seems that only FIFA is being looked after. We have been there
all along, we are still going to be here after FIFA and they (FIFA) is
the one now taking preference as opposed to the survival of traders,"
explained Charles.

Yasmin Erinzen said she has been trading at the Mitchells Plain Town
Centre for the last 30 years. She felt that the City is now taking food
out of her mouth with the new permit system. According to Erinzen the
new by-law has had a negative impact on the traders in the Town Centre.
"It's affecting us badly. We have been in Mitchells Plain for 30 years
and then just to decide that we are going to move you was not done
fairly," said Erinzen.

Unfair
She explained that she had raised her children at the site where she was
trading. "I have raised my children under my table in front of Link in
Symphony Lane. The process was not fairly executed because they will
move me from my trading bay and put someone else there. If you want to
upgrade the place then it must be upgraded in a proper manner," she said.

She felt that the City should have called all concerned parties together
and not just work with fifteen people. "They actually sold us out
because if you look at it properly they have taken people out of their
comfort zone and moved other people in their place," explained Erinzen.
According to Erinzen government has not subsidized their business.

"Government never gave us money the City never gave us money to start
trading in Mitchells Plain. We took our own money and started something
in Mitchells Plain. Why does the City threaten us with law enforcement
and say they are going to throw us out of Town Centre," she said.

Erinzen said they are not opposing to any changes that will improve the
trading areas that they currently have. "We are not scared of change but
what we want is fairness. The Mayor Dan Plato has promised us that he
will have a meeting with us, which has still not taken place. A workshop
was held by City for the traders, but the Mayor was not present," said
Erinzen.



Residents want officials to answer for R20 mil
JP du Plessis (Eyewitness News) 24 February 2010

Residents in Sharpeville embarked on a violent service delivery protest
on Tuesday, and said they want to know when their local stadium will be
upgraded.

The residents claim government promised to upgrade the George Thabe
Stadium, but they believe the R20 million promised for this has gone
into local official¡¯s pockets.

The residents of the township lined the streets. Once in a while one of
the braver individuals risked getting shot by rubber bullets as they
rolled more tyres onto the fires already burning on the main road.

The residents of Sharpeville said they want the mayor of Sedibeng to
account the R20 million. They have vowed to keep the violence going
until officials come to address them and said they are willing to burn
their township to the ground.
(Edited by Deshnee Subramany)



Mayhem in Orange Farm
Lebogang Seale 23 February 2010

As Gauteng Premier Nomvula Mokonyane promised "a year of action"
yesterday, Orange Farm erupted, with disgruntled residents barricading
routes and looting shops in another round of service delivery protests.

Thick black smoke engulfed parts of Drieziek extensions 1, 4 and 8 of
the sprawling township, south of Joburg, as residents blockaded the
Golden Highway - the main road cutting through the settlement - and
major streets with burning tyres, rocks, concrete barriers and old
furniture.

Police in riot gear had their hands full, fighting running battles with
the mob, including children.

In the mayhem that followed, a police officer was injured and a police
van had its windscreen smashed. Time and again when the police appeared
to have succeeded in dispersing the crowd, the mob regrouped and
unleashed their anger by burning more tyres.

During the violence, Somali businessmen Yusuf Diirane and Sahane Hibil
could only watch helplessly as their store was looted. Often, police had
to fire stun grenades to quell the riots.

"Please don't leave!" pleaded Diirane, before a police officer assured
them that "we won't leave you alone".

More than 30 people were arrested on charges of public violence and
malicious damage to property.

Yesterday's violent protests came as Mokonyane outlined her plans for
this year, which she dubbed as a "year of action... to speed up service
delivery", and during which she declared that "our people cannot wait
any longer".

But Orange Farm residents rampaged through the streets, decrying the
slow pace of service delivery. At the core of their grievances was poor
sanitation, with many lamenting the lack of sewerage in the township.

"It's only a matter of time (before) we all die of cholera because of
the overflowing pit toilets," said Selina Dibase, who lives in a
two-room shack with her two teenage children.

She has been waiting for a low-cost house since 2006, but, like many
residents, she said it was the toilets "buzzing with flies" that she was
worried about. "They're failing to drain these toilets, so they must
just provide us with flushing ones."

Evidence of an uncompleted sewerage project that started early last year
could be seen around the area. According to residents, the contractor
had stopped working because he had not been paid.

As night fell, residents vowed to intensify their protest action until
their demands were met.



Heavy police presence in Orange Farm
Lebogang Seale and Kim Tshukulu 23 February 2010

Residents of Orange Farm, south of Joburg, continued to wage running
battles with the police on Tuesday morning as they tried to intensify
their protest action over alleged poor service delivery.

Drieziek Extensions 1, 3, 4 and 8 of the township - where most of the
violent protests have been concentrated - appeared to have been calm
early on Tuesday morning following Monday's incidents. But shortly
before 8am, a crowd of disgruntled residents marched through the streets
towards the busy Golden Highway and again barricaded the road with
burning tyres, rocks, logs and road signs. Police had to fire stun
grenades, rubber bullets and teargas to disperse the crowd that was
quickly swelling as more and more residents joined in.

For a moment, the police appeared to have managed to keep the protesters
at bay, but time and again, incidents of looting were reported on some
stores in the settlement. Scores of people, including children, were
arrested on charges of public violence and malicious damage to property.

The busy highway was opened to traffic shortly before 10am and the
police were maintaining a heavy presence.



Shops looted in Orange Farm protest
Sapa 23 February 2010

Foreigners' shops were looted in Orange Farm during a service delivery
protest on Tuesday, police said.

Inspector Mzimkhulu Mthimkhulu said residents went on the rampage at
Extension 7 and 8, ordering shopkeepers out of their stores then taking
their goods.

"Police fired rubber bullets to disperse the mob and restore order," he
said.

Police were keeping a close eye on the situation where angry Orange Farm
residents pelted police with stones and burnt tyres on Monday. They
damaged police vans in the process.

Police retaliated by firing rubber bullets and teargas before arresting
30 people for public violence.

The Golden Highway had again been closed on Tuesday after protesters
burned tyres and blocked the road with rocks, Johannesburg metro police
spokesman Chief Superintendent Wayne Minnaar said. - Sapa



Blockade of the Golden Highway in Orange Farm
22nd February 2010

This week has opened with furious defensive statements from the ANC
Youth League against the weekend¡¯s media reports about the lavish
lifestyle of its president and the millions he has made from tenders
awarded to companies he has interests in. Our response to this news
cannot just be of disgust at the self-enrichment of those individuals in
positions of political influence. Neither can our response be plaintive
calls for public officials to account for the vanishing funds. Instead,
we can only resist the underdevelopment of poor communities that this
culture of greed is causing. These are called protests against the lack
of service delivery. But more than that, these are protests against the
corruption of development projects opened by privatisation and pursued
by the tenderpreneur class. The tendering system to deliver services is
only empowering a few at the expense of community upliftment.

Residents who are angry at the failure of the local municipality to
deliver services have blockaded the Golden Highway in Orange Farm since
1a.m. this morning. Police have tried to disperse the protestors using
teargas and rubber bullets but as of 4p.m., the blockade is in force.
One woman has been reported injured by a rubber bullet and five arrests
have been made by the police on charges still to be decided.

Development has been promised to Orange Farm since 1994 and despite
these promises being reaffirmed on numerous occasions, the only
development that seems to be moving forward is of 2010 World Cup
projects. The repeated failure to develop Orange Farm has passed the
point of any excuse and the public officials and the ward councillors
who have received questions and complaints from residents can no longer
muster a shame-faced response. It is left to residents to take direct
action to voice their protest and to the police to punish them for their
discontent.

No peace for 2010 without development
For more information and comment, contact Bricks Mokolo 0721758948.



Itireleng residents fight on against eviction
Anti Privatisation Forum

The Pretoria High Court will tomorrow (23 February) hear the application
by residents of Itireleng to restore them to their plots and allow them
to rebuild their shacks. The Tshwane Metro Police and the Red Ants
dismantled their homes over a month ago, evicting them from a portion of
the informal settlement that had been sold to PPC Cement. 49 people were
injured during the eviction in which police attacked with batons, rubber
bullets and reportedly live ammunition. Other residents on land still
owned by the municipality were also removed, though no eviction notice
had been being issued for this portion of Itireleng. Some of them have
returned to rebuild. The rest of the 800 families affected by the mass
eviction have been living in make-shift shelters with their few
remaining belongings, helped by the emergency relief services of the Red
Cross.

Lawyers for Human Rights is acting on behalf of the residents. The first
hearing on the 9th of February was postponed to allow the LHR more time
to consult with residents, who packed the courtroom to leave no doubt
about the urgency of their plight.

Call Mashao Chauke for an update on the court case, 0822126518

Anti Privatisation Forum
123 Pritchard Street (cnr Mooi)
6th floor Vogas House, Johannesburg
Tel: (011) 333-8334 Fax: (011) 333-8335
Website: www.apf.org.za



Commuters 'fed up' with bus service run by Tansnat
Lyse Comins Daily News 15 February 2010

Durban bus commuters are fed up with a service that was inefficient,
infrequent and expensive and the eThekwini Municipality should take back
control of the former municipal bus service that is presently run by
Tansnat Africa, says the SA National Civic Organisation.

This was just one of the calls for drastic government intervention from
Sanco in Durban yesterday, as regional secretary Richard Hlophe
underlined the 13 000-member group's campaigns for the year.

He said the organisation had held its regional general meeting in the
city to develop a plan to deal with the issues facing communities.

Among the urgent calls made by the organisation was for the government
to regulate the price of bread and to clamp down on corruption in the
housing and municipal flat rentals sectors.

Hlophe said the city was facing a "serious crisis" concerning the
unreliable bus service and if the problem was not fixed, commuters would
boycott the buses and stage protest marches to express their grievances.
He said the organisation would meet the municipality and senior ANC
officials within the next two weeks to discuss concerns.

In December, Acting Judge Adrian Rall ruled in the Pietermaritzburg High
Court that the KwaZulu-Natal Transport Depart- ment had not complied
with statutory procedures in appointing Tansnat Africa to run the bus
service.

He ordered the service be suspended, saying that the contract should
have gone to tender. Last week, the department was granted leave to
appeal the decision.

Hlophe said: "Umlazi commuters have decided to not use the buses because
there has to be an efficient, sufficient and affordable service. Those
buses are too expensive and there are no timetables."

He said Sanco had conducted its own research and it had found that
Tansnat had not signed a contract with the city. "We want the
municipality to take over those buses. They promote the use of public
transport over private transport, so they should make the buses
reasonable. They are more expensive than the taxis," Hlophe said.

However, Tansnat Africa CEO Mike Jesserman said the company had a
contract with the city, although maintenance contracts for vehicles were
held by the city and repairers.

"We have a contract for each and every vehicle we take on board; we get
permits for every vehicle; and we have the contracts for the drivers,"
he said.

"The timetables are in the process of being printed and they have been
finalised," Jesserman said.

Hlophe said that after the arrest last week of two eThekwini
Municipality housing officials on charges of corruption, residents were
"fed up" with reports of alleged corruption in government housing
schemes and rental flats, and had decided to conduct their own
investigation.

He said members at the meeting had been instructed to interview
residents and housing department officials to get to the bottom of the
problem of shoddy housing.

"Houses have been built, but there are no roads and infrastructure. Some
of the houses are leaking and there are no toilets and no water,'"
Hlophe said.

He said it was "unacceptable" to move people from squatter camps to
houses without proper sanitation.



Angry parents protest as school staffers investigated for fraud
Mawande Jack HERALD REPORTER (Weekend Post) 22 February 2010

A TEACHER, her boyfriend and a member of Coega Primary School governing
body are being investigated by the police for allegedly trying to
defraud the school of thousands of rands.

The incident sparked a protest on Friday by angry parents who called for
the removal from the premises of the suspended teacher and the governing
body member ¨C a clerk at the school ¨C while the case was being investigated.

Staff members, including the principal, have refused to go to class in a
show of support for the teacher. The situation at the school was tense
last week after clashes between protesting parents and teachers.

The clerk was arrested by the Swartkops police after a charge was laid
against him for allegedly having attempted, with the teacher and her
boyfriend, to cash a R17000 cheque.

Police spokesman Inspector Hazel Mqala confirmed that the clerk had been
arrested and released on bail. The teacher and her boyfriend were also
facing fraud charges.

Governing body chairman Ntombomzi Mapongwana said they had been phoned
by the bank after it was found that the three, who went to cash the
cheque, were not signatories on the school bank account.

Two other school cheques had also gone missing, she said.

Mqala said the signature of the school¡¯s treasurer had allegedly been
forged and a false identity document used.

Parents said the fraud had taken place while the school was already
struggling with funds.

¡°Our children do not get the things we pay for. The school is dirty,
toilets are not in use and classrooms are in a terrible state,¡±
Mapongwana said.

At a meeting called by the Education Department, parents were urged to
allow the teacher and clerk to be at school while the case was being
investigated. Angry parents then accused department officials of
covering up for the two.
jackm@avusa.co.za



UNEMPLOYED PEOPLE¡¯S MOVEMENT CALLS FOR R2000.00 GUARANTEED INCOME FOR THE UNEMPLOYED
THE UNEMPLOYED PEOPLE OF SOUTH AFRICA.PRESS RELEASE 22 February 2010

We have read with dismay the weekend news that Julius Malema has
profited from more than R130-million worth of tenders in just two years.
The projects range from road and pavement construction bulk water and
upgrading cemeteries.

This country is still recovering from the Arms Deal saga that cost tax
payers not less than R25-38 billion for the benefit of the few.

Our government is corrupt and fraudulent beyond repairs. Yet our country
remains the most unequal in the world. Many people live in permanent
poverty and millions are unemployed for most of their adult lives.

This country is rich in resources and yet the majority remain poor and
are stuck in worsening poverty. We beat all the countries in the world
on unemployment rate, half of the population is unemployed and we have
just become the most unequal country in the world.

It is for this reason that Unemployed People¡¯s Movement (Grahamstown)
calls on the government to immediately announce a guaranteed income of
R2000.00 per month for all underemployed or unemployed adults.
Furthermore we call upon all progressive movements¡¯ organizations and
individuals to rally behind this call.

UNEMPLOYED PEOPLE¡¯S MOVEMENT (UPM)
¡°We call upon the right to work¡­¡±
69 C Nompondo Street, Grahamstown, 6139
Contacts: 072 299 5253, 078 625 6462, 073 578 3661

xola.mali@yahoo.com,
href="mailto:ayandakota@webmail.co.za">ayandakota@webmail.co.za

Yours in Socialist Revolution

Xola Mali
Ayanda Kota
Media and Communications Officer
Convenor
Unemployed People¡¯s Movement (UPM)
Unemployed People¡¯s
Movement (UPM)
Cell: 0722995253
Cell: 0786256462
Email: xola.mali@yahoo.com
ayandakota@webmail.co.za



All calm following Jo'burg service delivery unrest
Mail & Guardian 23 February 2010

The Golden highway was opened to traffic about 7am on Tuesday following a violent protest on Monday that left a Johannesburg metro policeman injured, metro police said.

"We've just opened the Golden highway to traffic, it is now safe," Superintendent Wayne Minnaar said.

He said that police would keep a close watch on the area where angry residents pelted police vans with stones and burnt tyres on Monday.

Protesting Orange Farm residents began demonstrating at about 1am on Monday and at about 3pm the 1 500 resident started pelting police with stones and damaging their vans in the process.

Police retaliated by firing teargas and rubber bullets and arrested 30 people for public violence.

A metro police official was sent to Lenmed hospital in Lenasia, south of Johannesburg, after he was injured on his leg during the protest.

The protest came just hours after Gauteng Premier Nomvula Mokonyane delivered her address to the opening of the provincial legislature, declaring 2010 a year of improved service delivery.

"It is the year for all of us to work together to speed up service delivery. Our people cannot wait any longer," she said.

Monday's protests in Orange Farm follows similar flare ups in Balfour, and other parts of the country, as residents vent their anger at the slow pace of service delivery. -- Sapa
www.mg.co.za



Media statement on the SAMWU Ekurhuleni March taking place today
SAMWU PRESS STATEMENT. 23rd February 2010

The SAMWU Branch Executive Committee meeting held on the 09 ¨C 10 February 2010 has done an analysis on the state of the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan municipality and other organizational issues. We found that the time has come to elevate issues that affect the community and workers, in line with resolution and mandate of the workers. SAMWU Ekurhuleni workers will be marching to deliver a memorandum to the Executive Mayor today the 23rd of February 2010. Our analysis was informed by the inconsistent manner in which the municipality is run.

Surely the Provincial government must account for the money utilized to pay the so called team of six and the plans they put in place. Unfortunately the only thing that we see in this municipality is the depletion of the operating budget without any work being done for the community of Ekurhuleni.

The culture of people who are deployed to loot the state resources must come to an end because the community cannot afford to keep quiet anymore when their money is being wasted, without anyone accounting for the work that is being done.

The use of private companies or so called ¡°BEE companies¡± in the black communities undermines the very effort of promoting economic transformation.

Municipal services in Ekurhuleni that have been outsourced without following due processes;

Information Technology & Communication services,
Municipal court¡¯s speed sections,
Refuse removal and transfer stations,
Meter readings,
Fleet management,
Call centre on sewerage, water and electricity,
Legal services and etc
On the 18th of June 2008 we entered into an agreement with the municipality about the process of outsourcing, this agreement sadly has never been honoured, as a result the municipality continues to present/create new versions of their understanding of the agreement. The time has come for the municipality to stop behaving in an ignorant manner with regard to the agreement that has since been made a council resolution. Those who have participated in awarding tenders, contravening this council resolution must be suspended and later disciplined.

We are constantly asking ourselves as workers; why should we be led by people who tarnish the name of the movement and behave like they have the interest of the community at heart.

Therefore if the Executive Mayor and the City Manager do not respond positively to our demands we will be proceeding with the march to the Premier, to demand that action be taken quickly to meet our demands so that service delivery would not be further hampered.

The services that will be affected due to the march are as follows:

Libraries will be closed
All rates halls will be closed
All licensing centres will be closed
The refuse will not be collected
Grass cutting
General administration/offices will be affected
Water and electricity will also be affected
Our members on behalf of the community of Ekurhuleni are ready to do whatever it takes to resolve this sad situation.

For further comment contact SAMWU Ekurhuleni Branch Secretary Koena Ramotlou on (011) 815 3586 or 073 254 9394.

Issued by:
Tahir Sema.
South African Municipal Workers' Union of COSATU
National Media and Publicity officer
tahir.sema@samwu.org.za
Office: 011-331 0333.
Cell: 0829403403.



2000 mineworkers march to Western Chrome mine
NUM 23 February 2010

Over two thousand mine workers will this afternoon at 15H00 gather at Western chrome mine in Mooinooi, between Brits and Rustenburg to present a memorandum of demands to management. The workers demand amongst other things: Decent accommodation and that the company should review its housing policy; that miners and smelters should negotiate around one negotiation table; training and development; an end to nepotism and discrimination as well as real transformation. ¡°We are tired over a plethora of issues chief amongst them is the issue of housing. We cannot live in residences that are reminiscent to pig stables any more, we need change and that change must happen now¡± says Mandlenkosi Tyesi, the NUM¡®s Branch Secretary at Western Chrome.

¡°We are marching to present a memorandum as a warning to say if our demands are not attended to, then we may have no option but to seriously consider strike action¡± says Tyesi.

Mandlenkosi Tyesi- 072 967 1010
Lesiba Seshoka
Head: Media & Communications
National Union of Mineworkers
Tel: (011) 377 2047
Mobile: 082 803 6719
LesibaS@num.org.za



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