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Publication Details

Reference
South African Protest News 30 August 5 September 2010  (2010) South African Protest News 30 August 5 September 2010 .  : -.

Summary
SA govt, strikers brace for new wage talks
Business Report 3 September 2010

Bargaining sessions planned for next week
Striking South African state workers held small-scale protests on Friday as union and government negotiators prepared for bargaining next week aimed at ending the three-week walkout by about 1.3 million.

The unions rejected a government offer of 7.5 percent pay raises, nearly double inflation, and 800 rand a month for housing, with workers demanding a better offer.

The parties have a bargaining session planned for Monday where they will try to find a way to end the strike that has been the biggest in terms of lost man days in three years.

The strike has hit hardest the legions of poor who depend on state services to live and has quashed the euphoria the country felt after hosting the June-to-July soccer World Cup.

"It can go either way on Monday. But whatever the outcome it will be a united position from Cosatu and the independent unions," said a union spokesman who did not want to be named.

The unions, who represent court clerks, prison guards, customs officials and nurses, are seeking pay rises of 8.6 percent and 1 000 rand a month for housing. Most are affiliated with Cosatu, the country's largest labour federation.



Government officials said the state cannot afford the offer they have already put on the table and there is no more room in the budget to increase its offer, which would swell state spending by about one percent.

"A greater volume of taxpayer money will have to be spent on state employees, thereby detracting from much needed expenditure on improving education, health, transport and infrastructure," said NKC Independent Economists economist Christie Viljoen.

Pay and benefits is the biggest expenditure category in the state budget. In 2006/07, about 35 percent of tax revenue went towards it. That rose to about 47 percent in 2009/10.

Cosatu put on hold a plan to have all its near two million members in vital industries including mining, go on a sympathy strike to allow the state workers to consider the new offer.

A prolonged strike by all Cosatu members would put enormous pressure on the government to reach a deal to prevent any major blow to Africa's largest economy. - Reuters
www.busrep.co.za


Doctors call for resolution to public sector strike
IOL News 2 September 2010

The Doctors' Forum on Thursday called on the government and public service unions to end their strike.

"We call on government to continue negotiations with immediate effect and work hard for a compromise solution between themselves and the unions," the association's spokesman Moatshe Sekhu said in a statement.

Unions have rejected government's offer of a 7.5 percent wage increase and a R800 housing allowance.

They were demanding an 8.6 percent hike and a R1000 housing allowance.

The forum said the strike was endangering critically ill people.

"A significant number of patients who were critically ill and in intensive care units were transferred to private hospitals and clinics. They receive inadequate care because our doctors have to travel from their place of work to see them in private clinics, thus limiting necessary continuity of care, possible when all our patients are in one place."

Other critical patients did not see their loved ones, as their families had to travel long distances to see them.

"It is possible that more avoidable deaths have occurred amongst this group of patients."

HIV/Aids patient unable to access their treatment risked becoming drug resistant and chronically ill patients were developing complications.

The forum was opposed to minimum service agreements, as proposed by the unions, as the sick deserved "the best possible care".

The inability of negotiators to reach a solution had led to the strike having "untold misery on our patients".

The forum represents public hospital doctors, dentists, private practitioners, medical officers, medical and surgical specialists, community service doctors, interns and medical students in their fifth and sixth years of study
www.busrep.co.za


Worker anger sinks offer
Mail & Guardian 3 September 2010

The 1,3-million striking public service workers who rejected the government's revised wage offer this week appear to have sent a loud "no!" not just to the state but also to their own trade union leaders.

This emerged after Themba Maseko, the government spokesperson, told the Mail & Guardian that the state's latest offer -- which included a 7,5% salary increase (up from 7%) and an R800 housing allowance (up from R700) -- had been hammered out by a task team consisting of negotiators from both the unions and the government last week.

Yet union leaders, several of whom were making positive noises about the offer this week, were unable to convince their members, who, on Wednesday, rejected it.

At the time of going to press, workers were still holding out for an 8.6% wage increase and R1 000 housing allowance; and Cosatu and the Independent Labour Caucus (comprising unions not aligned with Cosatu) were still locked in talks.

The workers' intransigence left unions such as the National Education, Health and Allied Workers' Union (Nehawu), which has about 245 000 members, backtracking on Thursday.

Sizwe Pamla, the Nehawu spokesperson, said on Thursday that the union's consultation with members earlier this week was "flawed" and it would be taking the offer back to its members over the next two days for a "more thorough engagement with it".

Pamla said its members were not adequately briefed about the finer details of the new offer. These included "the government's commitment to develop and implement a sustainable housing scheme" within specific time frames, the conclusion of a minimum service agreement for essential service staff by December 31 this year, and future bargaining processes to be realigned with the government's budget processes.

"Our members just balloted on the basic wage and housing allowance offer, not the whole package, which we hope to do, with the responses consolidated by the weekend," said Pamla.

Earlier in the week Fikile Majola, the Nehawu general secretary, had indicated his leadership's willingness to advise members to accept the offer.

According to sources present at the Public Service Coordinating Bargaining Council meeting between Cosatu-affiliated trade unions such as Nehawu and unions belonging to the Independent Labour Caucus on Wednesday, Majola had wanted to return to Nehawu structures to convince members to accept the offer but had been dissuaded from doing so by negotiators from the South African Democratic Teachers' Union (Sadtu).

Sadtu members in all nine provinces rejected the new offer outright, said Nomusa Cembi, the Sadtu spokesperson. She said its members were angry about the government's lethargy in resolving the strike and were wary about selling out to the government.

Steven Friedman, a political analyst and the director of the University of Johannesburg's Centre for the Study of Democracy, said the "anger displayed by union members" in rejecting the offer was reflective of a theme running through broader society.

"There is a lot of anger, prompted primarily by the perception that politicians are living the high life while the rest suffer," he said, citing extravagant spending by the government on ministerial cars and World Cup ticket binges.

This had fed the public's sense of "disenchantment and distrust" of a "government that doesn't care about us and doesn't listen to us", he said.

According to several union leaders, the workers' anger had also been fuelled by the bullying tactics of Richard Baloyi, the public service and administration minister, early on in the strike.

"He's out of his depth in this job -- that much has become obvious to us. He has nothing so he has tried to bully us with R10 offers and threats. This has only served to make them more determined to hold out," said Pamla.

Friedman said that union leaders were also reaping the fruit of their "assiduous promotion" of President Jacob Zuma when they supported him during his drive for the ANC presidency in 2007.

"[Cosatu general secretary Zwelinzima] Vavi had done the hard sell on Zuma ... but one has to question how deep through the unions this support actually runs … There remains heightened expectation of this government because of that sell," Friedman said.

Thobile Ntola, the Sadtu president, said his members' determination "not to compromise at all" was based on a "deep mistrust of government ... and the sense that government doesn't respect us". He said that the levers of power were being used to create a "dynasty government where the president [Zuma] and his friends and family are enriching themselves at the expense of workers and the poor. This is creating anger among workers."

In a statement released after Wednesday's Cabinet meeting Themba Maseko, the government spokesperson, said: "Simply put, there is no money available. The resources to cover the draft agreement proposal will have to come from reducing expenditure in other areas in the budget."
www.mg.co.za


Solidarity declares dispute at Columbus Stainless
Moira Kloppers 3 September 2010

Solidarity has declared a wage dispute with the stainless-steel producer Columbus Stainless at the Metal and Engineering Industries Bargaining Council (MEIBC). This comes after the employer and trade unions reached a deadlock in the third round of negotiations at the steel producer in August.

According to Deon Reyneke, head of industry of Solidarity’s Metal and Engineering Industry, trade unions rejected Columbus Stainless’ wage offer of 5% in the third round of negotiations at the steel company and a strike certificate has meanwhile bee issued following the failure to agree on a wage increase at the MEIBC.

“Solidarity signed a five-year wage agreement with the company in 2008, but in terms of a clause in the agreement, negotiations were reopened this year when the CPI dropped below 5%,” Reyneke explained. “The members must now decide whether they want to strike, and the voting process is already under way,” Reyneke added.


Unions go back to members with pay offer
Mail & Guardian 3 September 2010

The protracted public servants' strike continued on Thursday with the Congress of South African Trade Unions and Independent Labour Caucus (ILC) declaring a "preliminary" rejection of the government's latest pay offer.

Following a meeting between the two on Thursday, ILC chairperson Chris Klopper said: "Some of the unions found it extremely difficult to sell to their constituencies. They will now enter into processes of explaining the document to representatives and members."

The document goes beyond the widely reported 7,5% wage increase and R800 housing allowance offer and includes proposals on medical scheme payments and the minimum service-level agreement.

"The ILC decided that because the majority of unions were leaning towards the negative, we won't have any other option other than that we also reject the offer."

But said, Klopper, this was subject to the ILC and Congress of SA Trade Unions continuing consulting their members.

"They must factor in if further participation in industrial action will render further gains and what public opinion is, and then most of all what the cost of further strike action will be in terms of no-work, no-pay in terms of gains."

They hoped for a decision by Monday.

"Labour unity is important and we must protect each other and therefore it is a question of further unity."

According to a copy of the latest offer on the Public Servants' Association website, the government had withdrawn the offer on the table on August 20. At the time, the government said it intended unilaterally implementing the offer, because it had no more money.

The new proposal, made on August 31, consists of an across-the-board increase of 7,5% and a housing allowance of R800 a month, compared with the current R500, both with effect from July 1.

The government further committed itself t developing and implementing a home ownership scheme; investigating the equalisation of the medical aid subsidy; and finalising the minimum service-level agreement.

It intended to implement by April 1 a post-retirement medical subsidy for Government Employees Medical Scheme members which was aligned with that of serving employees.

It also wanted to align the negotiation processes with the Budget process, with a new round of talks starting in October and concluding on July 31.

Part of the agreement would be measures for public servants to return to work after the strike.

Picket lines
Meanwhile, strikers in Gauteng were urged to report to picket lines at hospitals and schools at 6.30am on Friday.

Joe MpiSi, from the National Education Health and Allied Workers' Union, said: "All the hospitals must be closed tomorrow and people must be at the picket lines at 6.30am" at the conclusion of a march
through Johannesburg.

"All the clinics in the township must be closed. All schools in Soweto must be closed. This strike can only come to an end if all our members respond to this call," he said.

He also called on union members to identify anyone who had been drinking alcohol during Thursday's march because "we want everybody to behave. We are fighting a genuine cause".

Next week they would visit a "very strategic building" in Johannesburg to "make things happen".

Debbie Raphuti from the Democratic Nurses Organisation also said people with cars should be at Mary Fitzgerald Square at 10am for a convoy to an as-yet unnamed destination. - Sapa
www.mg.co.za


NUMSA MEMBERS TO MARCH IN DURBAN FOR A LIVING WAGE & SUSTAINABLE LIVELIHOODS!
Numsa 2 September 2010

The NATIONAL UNION OF METALWORKERS OF SOUTH AFRICA (NUMSA) representing 70, 000 workers working in garages, components, workshops and automotives sectors will be marching tomorrow Saturday 03 September 2010, Durban, KwaZulu-Natal province. This march forms part of the organisational strategy to exert pressure to the captains of the motor industry to accede to workers demands for improved conditions of employment and decent wages.

The march will be led by NUMSA President Cde CEDRIC GINA, Regional Secretary Cde MBUSO NGUBANE, and joined by the Provincial Secretary of COSATU Cde ZET LUZIPHO and Young Communist League (YCLSA) Deputy National Secretary Cde KHAYE NKWANYANA.

A throng of 5,000 workers will converge at King Dinizulu statue, Durban, tomorrow morning to march through the streets of Durban to hand-over a Memorandum of Demands to Retailers Motor Industry (RMI), Fuel Retailers Association (FRA).

This march will be taking place amidst arrests and harassment of NUMSA members by the SAPS. This is clear indication of the high level abuse of state organs by the ruling class to muzzle and deny workers their constitutional rights to assemble and embark on protected industrial actions. This should serve as an indication to the ruling class that workers are not blind and their refuse to be subjected to the old apartheid police tactics of trampling upon their rights.

The details of the march are as follows:

DATE: Friday 03 September 2010
TIME: 09H00am
VENUE: King Dinizulu statue (opp Durban Christian Centre), Durban

Members of the media are hereby invited to attend and report. Issued by NUMSA

Enquiries:
Castro Ngobese
National Spokesperson – 073 299 1595


Unions reject govt's revised wage offer
Mail & Guardian 2 September 2010

The public-sector strike is set to continue after South Africa's main labour federation late on Wednesday rejected a revised government wage offer.

Strike season in full swing
"We got a report from unions and the overwhelming majority of provincial structures have rejected the government's offer, the strike continues," Congress of South African Trade Unions (Cosatu) general secretary Zwelinzima Vavi said.

However, the Independent Labour Caucus (ILC), one of the labour umbrellas representing about 1,3-million workers, was still divided on the offer.

Chris Klopper, chairperson of the ILC, said his organisation was "still in the process of collecting feedback from its members on the government's wage offer".

"We're not in a position at this stage to pronounce our stance. At this stage it’s a 50-50 ... we will know by Friday what the stance is," said Klopper.

Unions tabled the improved offer to their members after President Jacob Zuma ordered his ministers to negotiate a solution to the 15-day stoppage that has paralysed schools and hospitals.

"Unions will meet tomorrow morning [Thursday] to further discuss and assess where we are," said Vavi.

The government revised its offer to a 7,5% wage increase and an R800 housing allowance, up from its previous offer of a 7% raise and R700 for housing.

Unions are demanding an 8,6% increase and a R1 000 housing allowance.

No surprise
Cosatu's stance did not come as a surprise as earlier on Wednesday one of the biggest striking unions said it had refused the latest proposal.

"We have rejected the offer," said Sizwe Pamla, spokesperson for the National Education Health and Allied Workers, Union (Nehawu), which has about 244 000 members.

Zuma's order to break the deadlock came amid mounting pressure over the walk-out, which is now in its third week, as wage disputes spread to the private auto sector and forced an indefinite shutdown at a Volkswagen plant.

But the revised public-sector offer saw sympathy strikes planned for Thursday, including at the country's mines, called off to give civil servants time to vote on the new deal.

"The NUM would like to emphasise that this is a suspension and as such should a resolution not be found, the NUM reserves its right to strike," said the 320 000-strong National Union of Mineworkers.

Cosatu, which lists about two million members, had called for the solidarity strikes, which it suspended on Wednesday.

However, it also warned that future stoppages were possible.

"The federation would, however, stress that this is only a suspension and our affiliated unions remain ready to take solidarity strike action in support of the public-service workers if a resolution to the dispute is not reached." -- AFP
www.mg.co.za

It is forever and ever AMEN at Richards Bay Minerals
NUM 2 September 2010

Over 1700 workers at Rio Tinto and BHP Billiton ‘s Richards Bay Minerals have vowed to bring the company to its knees if their demands are not met. “It is going to be forever and ever AMEN for that company” says Bhekani Ngcobo, the NUM ‘s Regional Coordinator in Kwazulu-Natal. The strike at Richards Bay Minerals has now entered its seventh day and the workers are determined to take it months on end. Management at the joint venture remains confused and do not know what to do as they have not anticipated the 100% closure. “We are giving them the taste of a strike action. This is just the beginning. The worst is still to come when we bring all Rio Tinto and BHP operations to a grind” says Ngcobo. “What they see now is just harbingers of the worst to hit the companies” he says.

Meanwhile the talks that have been going at a snail pace have now collapsed as the company has refused to budge. For now the war is on against Richards Bay Minerals and the financial statements are already turning red.

Lesiba Seshoka
National Union of Mineworkers (NUM)
7 Rissik Street ,JOHANNESBURG
Tel: (011) 377 2047
Mobile: 082 803 6719


NUMSA KZN REGIONAL LEADER APPEARS IN COURT
2 September 2010

The Regional Chairperson of the NATIONAL UNION OF METALWORKERS OF SOUTH AFRICA (Numsa) in KwaZulu-Natal Cde BASIL CELE will appear this morning, 02 September 2010, at the PINETWON MAGISTRATE COURT, after being arrested for leading a motor strike in New Germany, Durban.

The court appearance of Cde Cele is a result of the trumped-up charges by the SAPS intended to use the organs of class rule – the courts – to silence popular dissent and genuine struggles for a living wage by workers. We are convinced that Cde Cele is innocent and he was leading a protected strike to raise workers frustrations with motor industry profiteers and exploiters. He is arrest is being lurched by SAPS in cahoots with the employers as part of using the courts to mitigate over wage disputes through state apparatus.

Cde Cele as he appears in court he will not be alone, but will be joined by thousands of motor workers as he faces the judge. He will be inspired by the fighting spirit of trade union martyr Cde Vuyisile Mini as he defends himself and the rights of workers to organize under the low profile state-intensity to silence workers.

The details of the court appearance are as follows:

DATE: Thursday 02 September 2010
TIME: 09H00am
VENUE: Pinetown Magistrate Court, Pinetown

Members of the media are hereby invited to attend and report.

Contact:
Castro Ngobese
National Spokesperson – 073 299 1595
Or
Mbuso Ngubane
Regional Secretary – 079 502 3242


COSATU Gauteng Press Release on the Public Service workers’ marches
Cosatu 2 September 2010

Cosatu and its public sector affiliates will be marching on 2 September 2010 to the following areas.

Pretoria
The workers will be gathering at cnr Schubart and Proes street at O9h00 and depart at 10h00 to the following areas:

- SAPS Head-Office to the National Commissioner

- Department of Finance

- Reserve Bank

Contact Person is Apson Makaung at 0796960034

JHB
The workers will be gathering at Newtown at 09h00 and depart at 11h00 to the following areas:

- Gauteng South High Court

- Department of Local Government and Housing

- Department of Finance

Contact Person is Debbie Raphuti at 0824497457

Ekurhuleni
The workers will be gathering at 09h00 at Germiston Lake and depart at 11h00 to the offices of the mayor.

For further information contact Matserane at 0835872766

The overall coordinator contact is Dumisani Dakile, COSATU Gauteng Provincial Secretary, at O827271422


NUMSA CONDEMNS APARTHEID STYLE POLICE HARASSMENT OF STRIKING WORKERS
NUMSA 1 September 2010

The National Union of Metalworkers of South Africa (Numsa) condemns the apartheid style brutal police harassment and arrest of striking motor workers in Durban and Port Elizabeth, KwaZulu-Natal.

The motor workers are on a strike after both Retail Motor Industry (RMI) and Fuel Retailers Association (FRA) failed to meet their wage demands and improved conditions of employment for workers for more than three months. These workers have a legitimate right to embark on a protected strike action to raise their frustrations with motor industry managers. It is our view that police cannot be bullied or used to mitigate over wage disputes through unleashing harassment and forceful arrest of our members. The role of the police is on the streets by fighting rampant scourge of crime in our communities and broader society.

The continuation by the police to cowardly and irresponsibly silence dissent through intimidation, forceful arrest or the barrel of the gun is tantamount to a police state. It is within this context that we are opposed to the militarization of the police force. This is informed by our ideological underpinnings that in a class divided society like South Africa, state apparatus particularly the police can’t be used to protect the interests of the owners of the means of production, as opposed to the broader interests of the working class and the poor. Therefore the dastardly arrests and intimidation of striking workers around Durban and Port Shepstone petrol stations should be understood and located within the context of police protecting the interests of motor bosses and their private accumulation interests. As Numsa rejects such co-option and agenda!

We call on our reliable ally Police and Prisons, Correctional Services Union (POPCRU) to consciountise their members working as police not to be irresponsibly used to reverse struggles intended to undermine the logic of capital at the point of production and broader economy. The police should be consciously aware that this struggle by motor workers is also in their own interest as part of fighting for decent work for decent pay.

We call on our members to remain resolute and fight until the bourgeoisie’s as personified by RMI and FRA concede to our demands.

We call on the Ministry of Police to release our members with immediate effect since our members are not thugs or irresponsible citizen. We call on employers to meet workers demands and stop using police to criminalize a legal and protected strike action.

Contact:
Castro Ngobese
National Spokesperson – 073 299 1595


Northam strike on the cards
NUM 1 September 2010

Over 8000 workers at Northam Platinum voted overwhelmingly in favour of a strike action. A notice to strike at Northam will be served this afternoon. The mineworkers demand that the company should offer them a wage increment of 15% on a one year deal and a R3500 Living out allowance. The company offers 8% on a two year deal and an additional R100 on the R1600 living out allowance. “The strike action has finally arrived. Northam is finally going to get what it applied for” says Ecliff Tantsi, the NUM ‘s Chief Negotiator at Northam. The NUM will serve a forty eight hour notice in terms of the law and the strike action will begin on Monday.

The National Union of Mineworkers (NUM) appeals to the company to stop dilly-dallying and deliver a good offer when it still has time to do so.

“We have no jokes. When our workers make demands, companies must quickly come on board” says Tantsi.

Ecliff Tansti- 082 941 4210

Lesiba Seshoka
National Union of Mineworkers (NUM)
7 Rissik Street ,JOHANNESBURG
Tel: (011) 377 2047
Mobile: 082 803 6719


MASS RALLY OF THE UNEMPLOYED IN DURBAN TO DEMAND DECENT WORK AND A GUARANTEED INCOME FOR ALL
Unemployed People’s Movement Press Statement 31 August 2010

VENUE: Glebelands Stadium, Umlazi
DATE: Wednesday 1 September 2010
TIME: 11:00
CONTACT PEOPLE: Ayanda Kota 078 625 6462, Nozipho Mnteshana 079 740 5074
SPEAKERS: Nozipho Mnteshana, Chairperson of the Unemployed People’s Movement in Durban and S’bu Zikode, President of Abahlali baseMjondolo South Africa

A million jobs were lost last year. Many people who are working remain poor. We cannot continue like this. Therefore we, as part of a growing solidarity and militancy on the part of the organisations of the working class are demanding:

1. A living wage for every worker.

2. A real commitment to take immediate radical action to create jobs for all. This must include an immediate moratorium on retrenchments and a decision to put the right to work in the constitution.

3. A guaranteed income for all those who do not have work.

We are also in full solidarity with the strikes for a living wage, the growing struggles for land & housing and free basic services as well as the long established struggles for decent health care.

Zwelinzima Vavi is quite correct to have declared that under the Zuma regime “We are heading rapidly in the direction of a full-blown predator state in which a powerful corrupt and demagogic elite of political hyenas increasingly controls the state as a vehicle of accumulation.” But while we support Vavi’s analysis and we affirm the complete legitimacy of the demands that the workers in COSATU are currently issuing we also call on COSATU to stop protecting the ANC from the anger of the people and to join hands with the community protests and social movements that have been at the forefront of the struggle against the predatory state in recent years. We need to unite and to pose the power of the organised working class against the tendency to predation on society via the state. This requires the solidarity of all the organs of working class power on the shop floor and in the communities.

We condemn the state repression faced by movements like Abahlali baseMjondolo in Durban and the Landless People’s Movement in Johannesburg. We also condemn the gutter politics to which some of the authoritarian leaders of the middle class left have resorted in order to protect their fiefdoms from the rising strength of the organised working class.

Our hope lies in the strength of the working class and our strength lies in our unity.
http://www.abahlali.org/node/7285


COSATU suspends solidarity strike
Cosatu 1 September 2010

In the light of the consultations and negotiations currently taking place around the public-sector strike, the Congress of South African Trade Unions has for the moment suspended the secondary strike which was scheduled to begin tomorrow. This is to give public servants’ unions sufficient time to consult with their members and then to resume talks with the government.

The federation would however stress that this is only a suspension and our affiliated unions remain ready to take solidarity strike action in support of the public service workers if a resolution to the dispute is not reached.

Patrick Craven (National Spokesperson)
Congress of South African Trade Unions
1-5 Leyds Cnr Biccard Streets
Braamfontein, 2017
P.O. Box 1019
Johannesburg, 2000
SOUTH AFRICA
Tel: +27 11 339-4911/24
Fax: +27 11 339-5080/6940/ 086 603 9667
Cell: 0828217456
patrick@cosatu.org.za


Motor industry strike starts
Mail & Guardian 1 September 2010

Members of the National Union of Metalworkers of South Africa (Numsa) working at petrol stations, workshops and motor dealerships downed tools on Wednesday, a union official said.

"Nothing has changed. The strike is going ahead," Numsa spokesperson Castro Ngobese told the South African Press Association.

He said it was impossible to say how many members were involved, but explained the union had 70 000 members across the country. They work as fuel attendants, or in workshops, dealerships and engineering, among others.

Talks were continuing with the Retailers Motor Industry (RMI) and Fuel Retailers Association (FRA) to resolve the impasse.

"Talks are continuing tonight [Wednesday]," Ngobese said.

Numsa's demands included a 20% wage increment across the board as well as a 40-hour week with full pay.

The union wanted a one-year bargaining agreement to be put in place beginning on September 1 2010, and ending on June 30 2011.

"Our demands to the RMI and FRA are consistent with the African National Congress' electoral commitments of creating decent work and sustainable livelihoods for the workers and the poor," the union said in a statement on Tuesday.

A march would take place in Bellville in the Western Cape where a memorandum of demands would be handed over to the RMI.

FRA chief executive Reggie Sibiya said on Tuesday the gaps between what it could offer and Numsa's demands were "too huge".

He said they had introduced a "huge wage adjustment" of 68% in 2007 to bring the industry in line with minimum living-wage expectations.

This was followed by above-inflation increases in 2008 and 2009. While the strike would reportedly affect service at petrol stations, Sibiya said no garages would be closed.

"Not everybody is part of the union so garages will not close."

He said the FRA had signed an agreement with the union preventing intimidation and victimisation. - Sapa
www.mg.co.za


Exarro shakes as stock is depleted
NUM 1 September 2010

The National Union of Mineworkers (NUM) condemns Exarro Sands in Kwazulu-Natal for its attempt to force workers from other operations to work as scab labour. In a desperate move, the company hired buses for workers to be transported to the strike infested operations. “We told our members at the other operations to refuse and they did refuse” says Bhekani Ngcobo, the NUM Negotiator at Exarro Sands. ‘Their stock piles have now been depleted and they are getting frustrated. We are going to mount their frustrations by intensifying the action” says Ngcobo. “Umxhasi u ya ngcangcazela (the employer is shaking)” says Ngcobo. “It is going to be worse when all Exarro operations are grounded” he says

“We remain committed to finding a resolution through negotiations but we cannot stop the strike until a resolution is found” he says

Bhekani Ngcobo- 071 670 6349

Lesiba Seshoka
National Union of Mineworkers (NUM)
7 Rissik Street ,JOHANNESBURG
Tel: (011) 377 2047
Mobile: 082 803 6719


NUMSA STATEMENT ON BRIDGESTONE – FIRESTONE
NUMSA 1 September 2010

The National Union of Metalworkers of South Africa (NUMSA) notes the psychopathic exploitative attitude displayed by the Japanese-based new tyre manufacturing Transnational Corporation (TNC) Bridgestone-Firestone.

The company unceremoniously disappeared from the New Tyre Manufacturing Industry Bargaining Council (NTMIBC) negotiations. These negotiations are aimed at resolving the wage increase and working conditions improvement dispute which led to a strike that started on Monday 30 August 2010, in the tyre and rubber manufacturing industry.

Since the start of the negotiations earlier this year Bridgestone-Firestone played the devil’s role by opposing any slightest move towards collective progress. The company adopted apartheid-style separatist approach by advancing and even tabulating counter-proposals that are lower than those made by the New Tyre Manufacturing Industry Employers’ Association (NTMIEA) to which it is affiliated.

Bridgestone-Firestone is definitely jeopardizing its own presence and sales in the economy of our country. As NUMSA we condemn Bridgestone-Firestone’s disgusting conduct to the contempt it deserves. Should Bridgestone-Firestone continue its attitude we shall be left with no other option but to explore other avenues and adopt much broader, deep-going actions through which the company will be hit harder in its entire history of existence.

Issued by Irvin Jim, General Secretary

Contact:
Castro Ngobese
National Spokesperson – 073 299 1595


NUM suspends public sector secondary strike
NUM 1 September 2010

The National Union of Mineworkers (NUM) has in the context of the current negotiations taking place in the public sector suspended the secondary strike which was scheduled to begin tomorrow. The intention of the suspension of the secondary strike is to give public servants sufficient time to consult with members and the state to finalise its talks with labour. “We call on all the parties involved to ensure a speedy resolution to this dispute and to ensure that workers are happy” says Frans Baleni, the NUM General Secretary. The NUM would like to emphasise that this is a suspension and as such should a resolution not be found, the NUM reserves its right to strike.

Frans Baleni- (NUM General Secretary)- 082 375 6443

Lesiba Seshoka
National Union of Mineworkers (NUM)
7 Rissik Street ,JOHANNESBURG
Tel: (011) 377 2047
Mobile: 082 803 6719


COSATU backs motor workers’ strike
Cosatu 1 September 2010

The Congress of South African Trade Union pledges its full support to the strike starting today,1 September 2010, by 70 000 members of the National Union of Metalworkers of South Africa (NUMSA) working in garages, components, workshops, automotives and dealerships.

COSATU appreciates that the union has held prolonged negotiations over wage increases and improvement in working conditions with both the Retailers Motor Industry (RMI) and Fuel Retailers Association (FRA. They have tried to persuade these stubborn employers to pay a decent wage to these low-paid workers but have been left with no alternative but to withdraw their labour.

NUMSA’s demands to RMI and FRA are consistent with the African National Congress’s electoral commitment to create decent work and sustainable livelihoods for the workers and the poor and with COSATU’s own living wage campaign.

The federation calls upon all its members to join the following pickets and demonstrations taking place across the country today, 1 September 2010:

KwaZulu-Natal
Durban, Pietermaritzburg, Ladysmith, Newcastle, Vryheid, Mandeni, Richards Bay, Port Shepstone and Kokstad
Cde Mbuso Ngubane, Regional Secretary – 079 502 3242

Northern Cape and Free State
Kimberley, Bloemfontein and Welkom
Cde Andile Zitho, Regional Secretary – 084 795 0548

Mpumalanga
Nelspruit, Witbank, Secunda, Middleburg, Ermelo and Piet Retief
Cde Eric Linda, Regional Secretary – 071 874 8223

Gauteng and Limpopo
Roodepoort, Krugersdorp, Dobsonville Mall, Jeppe Park, Droste Park, Mooi Street, Croesus, Booysens Reserve, Steeldale, Orphiton, Vanderbylpark, Vereeniging, Pretoria, Rosslyn, Brits, Rustenburg, Modimolle, Polokwane, Tzaneen, Phalaborwa, Messina and Makhado
Cde Sizwe Dlamini, Wits Regional Secretary – 071 874 8228
Cde Menchi Motsepe, Regional Secretary – 082 389 4050
Cde Lucky Sikosana, Sedibeng Regional Secretary – 071 874 8226

Eastern Cape
Port Elizabeth, Uitenhage and East London
Cde Vuyo Bikitsha, Regional Secretary – 083 656 9344

Western Cape
Parrow and George (NUMSA members will be marching in the two towns.
Cde Fred Peterson, Western Cape Regional Secretary – 083 561 1356

Patrick Craven (National Spokesperson)
Congress of South African Trade Unions
1-5 Leyds Cnr Biccard Streets
Braamfontein, 2017
P.O. Box 1019
Johannesburg, 2000
SOUTH AFRICA

Tel: +27 11 339-4911/24
Fax: +27 11 339-5080/6940/ 086 603 9667
Cell: 0828217456

patrick@cosatu.org.za


Strikes continue at Richards Bay Minerals and Exarro Sands
NUM 31 August 2010

The strike at Exarro Sands entered its seventh day today whilst the one at Rio Tinto and BHP Venture, Richards Bay Minerals entered its fifth. The workers remain steadfast in their call for a living wage. At Richards Bay Minerals, the 1700 NUM members demand a wage increment of 10% on a one year deal whilst the employer offers 8% on year-one and CPI plus 1,5% with a guaranteed increase of 6% for the other two years. Richards Bay Minerals proposes a three year deal. Workers further demand that a housing allowance for grades 6-10 be moved from R3200 to R4000 and grades 11-13 be moved from R5500 to R6000.

At Exarro Sands, over 600 workers demand a wage increment of 14% whilst the employer offers 8%. Workers further demand the phasing out of grade 8 in order to address the problem of lowest paid workers. A meeting between the union and the employer is currently on at Richards Bay Minerals whilst the CCMA will meet with the union and Exarro tomorrow morning in an attempt to resolve the dispute.

Meanwhile, workers have vowed to ensure the liquidation of the two companies if their demands are not met by the end of the week.

Lesiba Seshoka
National Union of Mineworkers (NUM)

7 Rissik Street ,JOHANNESBURG
Tel: (011) 377 2047
Mobile: 082 803 6719


Northam Platinum workers will strike
NUM 31 August 2010

Over six thousand mineworkers employed by Northam Platinum may down tools later this week over a wage dispute. The National Union of Mineworkers (NUM) demands a 15% wage increment and a Living out Allowance of R3500. The company offers 8% on a two year deal and an additional R100 on Living Out Allowance bringing the figure to a mere R1700 per month.

The parties have now reached a dispute with the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration (CCM) awarding a certificate of non-resolution. The NUM is currently canvassing its members for a strike action. “If members agree on the strike action, then the union will serve a 48 hour notice to strike” says Ecliff Tantsi, the NUM ‘s Chief Negotiator at Northam. “It is going to be a very difficult patch for the company as from this week. Life will never be the same again” says Tantsi.

“Already there are clear indications that workers would want a strike action in order to unravel these problems” he says.

Ecliff Tantsi- 082 941 4210

Lesiba Seshoka
National Union of Mineworkers (NUM)
7 Rissik Street ,JOHANNESBURG
Tel: (011) 377 2047
Mobile: 082 803 6719


Teachers divided on govt's latest wage offer
Mail & Guardian 31 August 2010

Signs of a split in unions' response to government's increased wage offer emerged on Tuesday, with the countries biggest union suggesting they could reject the offer.

The government increased its offer to striking public service workers on Monday night from 7% to 7,5% -- after unions demanded 8,6% -- after being ordered back to negotiations by President Jacob Zuma. The state has also upped its offer for a monthly housing allowance to R800, with unions demanding R1 000.

However, South African Democratic Teachers' Union president Thobile Ntola told M&G Education that his union might reject the offer.

"Judging from preliminary imput it appears as though the offer might be rejected," he said.

"However, we will not have an official reply to the offer until we meet on Wednesday morning."

But the country's second-largest teachers' union, however, is hopeful that its members will accept government's improved wage offer and bring an end to the crippling teachers' strike.

Ezrah Ramasehla, president of the National Professional Teachers' Organisation of South Africa said on Tuesday morning that his union will be taking the offer to its members on Tuesday and he had an optimistic outlook on the outcome.

"We seem to be in a difficult place right now, as everyone is feeling the effect of the strike," he said. "My feeling is that we should accept."

"If we reject the offer, we have to ask ourselves whether we still have the energy to draw battle lines."

The public service strike entered its third week on Monday, with schools being especially hard hit. The strike has brought most schools across the country to a halt and seven provincial education departments have announced postponements of preliminary matric examinations. These exams are considered to be test runs for the final exams.

While Ramasehla was hopeful that the latest offer would be accepted by all parties, he urged for "systems to be put in place to ensure this situation doesn't come up again."

"We should ensure that this situation does not arise in future by making sure that all public servants, including teachers are properly paid."

'Seeking balance'
Meanwhile, Democratic Alliance leader Helen Zille has called for the Labour Relations Act to be amended to limit the rights of teachers to strike.

Speaking at the Suid Afrikaanse Onderwyser Unie Principals Symposium in Port Elizabeth on Wednesday Zille said her party supported the right to strike, but also believes that rights should be exercised in a way that limits (as much as possible) undermining the rights of innocent parties.

"The actions of some union members will undoubtedly mean that many learners will fail their matric, or fail to meet the entrance requirements of tertiary institutions," she said.

"This is a tragedy that will have life-long consequences for them and their families. When it comes to exercising our rights, they are always balanced by our responsibilities and the rights of others."
www.mg.co.za


Unions mull govt's increased wage offer
Mail & Guardian 31 August 2010

Striking state workers will vote on Tuesday on an increased wage offer made by the government to try to end a nearly three-week-old strike, the Congress of South African Trade Unions (Cosatu) said.

The government increased its offer to 7,5% from 7% -- compared with the union demand for 8,6% -- after being ordered back to negotiations by President Jacob Zuma, under growing political pressure over the stoppages.

The strike has closed schools, prevented treatment at hospitals and harmed investor sentiment in Africa's biggest economy.

"The offer will be discussed by members today [Tuesday] and they will vote on whether to accept the new offer," Cosatu president Sidumo Dlamini told Reuters. "We don't know what members will do. Indeed there has been a shift and we expect members to look at it critically."

Union officials said a decision on whether to accept the new offer is likely to come early on Wednesday.

Analysts said the new offer could lead to an end of the worst labour action in terms of man-days lost in three years.

"There is a reasonable prospect that we are going to get this settled," said Gary van Staden, political analyst with NKC, independent economists.

However, South Africa's largest union of state employees -- teachers' union Sadtu -- said its members were likely to reject a revised government wage offer

"The general view is that the offer is being rejected and it is going to be difficult to push teachers," Thobile Ntola, Sadtu's president, told Reuters.

As well as the proposed wage increase, the government raised its offer for a monthly housing allowance to R800. Unions have been demanding R1 000.

Rank and file members, feeling the pinch from lost wages coming from the government's policy of "no work, no pay" for strikers, may want to end the dispute to prevent even more harm to their finances, he said.

Wider strike
Although its impact on currency, bond and stock markets has been minimal so far, that could change if the strike spreads to the broader economy. Cosatu has threatened a one-day sympathy strike by all members on Thursday if no deal is reached.

"At this stage, the sympathy strike on Thursday is on hold," Dlamini said. That strike by nearly two million members of affiliated unions would hit industries such as mining, manufacturing and communications.

Cosatu secretary general Zwelinzima Vavi said the group was still ready to up the stakes: "We have already mobilised for a strike on Thursday. If the offer is rejected, then we are ready for the mass strike."

Any agreement to end the dispute is likely to swell state spending by about 1% to 2%, forcing the government to find new funds just as it tries to bring down a deficit totalling 6,7% of gross domestic product.

There are worries that the deal could lead to higher taxes or cause South Africa to increase its borrowing, making it more costly to obtain loans and leading to increased budget spending to pay for servicing the debt.

"I think that it is more likely that we are going to see an increase in borrowing," Van Staden said. "They really do have to start worrying about their sovereign rating."

State workers said members would be angry the proposed pay rises were lower than those the government granted earlier this year to workers at major state-owned enterprises.

"The sore point is that parastatals received exceptional increases despite their reliance on bailouts from the state because their finances are in a mess," said a public-sector paramedic.

Workers have also been angry at the large wage gap between the lowest and highest paid civil servants. The lowest paid state employees make about 40% less than the average worker in South Africa, who takes home about R6 300 a month in salary and benefits.

"I earn R9 000 a month. After deductions I bring home about R5 000. If I worked in the private sector I would earn much more," the paramedic said. -- Reuters
www.mg.co.za


Government ups wage raise offer
Mail & guardian 31 August 2010

South Africa's government has tabled a new wage offer to striking public servants, Public Service and Administration Minister Richard Baloyi's spokesperson said on Tuesday.

"A negotiated draft settlement offer stands as follows -- a 7,5% salary increment and R800 monthly housing allowance," Dumisani Nkwamba said in a statement.

Asked if this meant the strike was at its end, he replied: "We hope so. The unions are consulting with their members and the government has called on them to expedite the process."

A feedback meeting was scheduled for Wednesday, after which Baloyi would address the media.

On his return from a state visit to China, President Jacob Zuma instructed Baloyi to return to the negotiating table on Monday morning, expressing concern that the strike was affecting mostly poor people.

The new offer came after talks with unions, represented by the Congress of SA Trade Unions (Cosatu) and the Independent Labour Caucus (ILC), continued late into the night.

A Reuters source previously put the offer at 8% incorrectly.

Unions have been demanding a salary increase of 8,6% and a R1000 housing allowance.

Prior to the new offer government has said it cannot afford the demand for increases of more than double inflation to end the strike, which threatens to spread across the economy.

Zuma's spokesperson said the president was particularly concerned about the strike's impact on health and education.

"The president's view is that the strike must end as soon as possible, in the next couple of days," Zizi Kodwa has said.

South Africa's biggest strike since 2007 in terms of lost man days has left bonds, stocks and the rand largely unaffected, but market players said the strike would cap gains by the rand and could have a bigger impact if it drags on.

Budget concerns
Analysts expect Zuma and the ruling African National Congress (ANC), which has typically given in to labour's demands, to reach a deal soon, tilted in favour of the unions, and worry later about the damage to state spending.

"Politically, this is beneficial for Zuma because he is in a tight spot with the unions at the moment," said Susan Booysen, a political analyst at Wits University.

"The country already has a high deficit. The rise may result in higher taxes as the government tries to balance its books."

The strike has deepened a rift in the ruling alliance between Zuma's ANC and the country's largest labour federation Cosatu, which helped bring him to power but is disappointed with him not advancing left-leaning policies.

The continent's biggest economy has been hit by a series of strikes in the private and public sectors in the past few months, which have led to above-inflation settlements.

Other disputes
In other disputes, workers at miner Exxaro have rejected an 8% raise and another strike at a Rio Tinto-BHP Billiton titanium joint venture saw operations shut down on Monday.

Cosatu has threatened to widen the strike this week to all its member unions, who it says represent about two million workers.

Workers in industries including mining will stage a one-day walk out on Thursday with Cosatu threatening a prolonged labour action that could bring the economy to a halt unless a settlement is reached in the state workers' strike.

South Africa is the world's fourth largest gold producer and largest platinum producer, with mines turning out about 488kg of gold and 385kg of platinum a day.

The country's biggest firms, such as Anglo Platinum, Impala Platinum and Harmony Gold Mining, have stockpiles of the precious metal and would not be hard-hit if it was a one-day work stoppage.

Any agreement to end the dispute is likely to swell state spending by about 1 to 2%, forcing the government to find new funds just as it tries to bring down a deficit totalling 6,7% of gross domestic product. -- Reuters and Sapa
www.mg.co.za


COSATU welcomes President's instruction to ministers

The Congress of South African Trade Unions welcomes the news that President Jacob Zuma has instructed ministers involved in the public-sector wage negotiations to return to the negotiating table immediately. The federation hopes that an improved offer will now be tabled and that the strike can be settled as quickly as possible, through an agreement that is acceptable to the workers.

COSATU repeats its condemnation of personal attacks and insults against anyone, in particular President Zuma. The federation apologises to him and his family, and all others to whom the insults were directed, for the hurt that these have caused.

We also condemn once again acts of violence or intimidation by anyone on either side, which are alien to our movement. Whatever the provocation, we call upon our members to maintain the highest levels of discipline and order and keep the strike peaceful.

Patrick Craven (National Spokesperson)
Congress of South African Trade Unions
1-5 Leyds Cnr Biccard Streets
Braamfontein, 2017
P.O. Box 1019
Johannesburg, 2000
SOUTH AFRICA

Tel: +27 11 339-4911/24
Fax: +27 11 339-5080/6940/ 086 603 9667
Cell: 0828217456
patrick@cosatu.org.za


ASINAMALI - WORKERS TO DOWN TOOLS IN TRYE AND RUBBER SECTORS!
Numsa 29 August 2010

The NATIONAL UNION OF METALWORKERS OF SOUTH AFRICA (Numsa) members working in the trye and rubber sectors will be downing tools as from tomorrow Monday 30 August 2010. NUMSA members working in the imperialist and foreign owned DUNLOP, BRIDGESTONE and CONTINENTAL companies in three (3) different provinces, namely KwaZulu-Natal, Eastern Cape and North West will be protesting and demonstrating to demand a living wage from the ruling oligarchy in the motor industry.

NUMSA has been negotiating wage increases and improvement in working conditions for almost three (3) months without a settlement.

The bargaining over wage increases and improvement in working conditions in 2010 has been taking place under conditions of capitalist economic crisis globally. The bosses created this crisis and are busy manufacturing more crises that pose the real threat to the perpetual existence of both human society and nature. It is NOT THE WORKERS who are responsible for causing this crisis but it is the workers who have carried the brunt in many ways:

· Short-time and temporary lay-offs which reduced take home pay;

· Outsourcing of work to labour brokers and the return of slave working conditions (at companies such as Lear Corporation labour brokers are responsible for a majority of the extremely exploited workforce);

· In the middle of the crisis the Reserve Bank of South Africa increased interest rates one Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) meeting after another, thereby also fuelling the rise in household debt and increasing repossessions of the least that many affected workers had;

· Jobs destruction which has led to over 1.1 million job loss bloodbath in the South African economy alone and therefore the sky-rocketing unemployment which intensifies the already crisis-levels poverty and inequality;

The current and persisting conditions of poverty and high cost of living have taught us that if we do not stand up for our own interests there shall be no charity or goodwill on the part of the capitalists to attend to our needs and aspirations on their own accord. Our demands are simple as compared to the billions in profits which we produce only to be consumed by a tiny minority. Our selected demands include:

· A minimum of R20 per hour in the motor sector and,

· Not less than double digits wage increase in both motor and tyre sectors; we believe this will assist in restoring lost wage buying power and lay the basis for a future advance to decent wages

· The curtailing of ordinary hours of work to 40 per week without loss of pay and benefits in the motor sector

· Pay for short time/lay-off both in the motor and tyre sectors

· Training and skills development including Adult Basic Education and Training (ABET) during working hours in both the motor and tyre sector

· Payment of Saturday hours at 1½, and Sunday and Holiday hours at double respectively in the tyre sector

· Total scrapping of labour brokers in both the motor and tyre sectors

· Full benefits for employees employed on Short Term Contracts (STCs) and their employment on permanent basis after 3 months in the tyre sector.

The details are as follows:

1. KwaZulu – Natal, Durban
DATE: 30 August 2010
TIME: 08H00am
VENUE: King Dinizulu Statue (Botha Gardens), Durban

Workers will converge at the King Dinizulu statue, opposite Durban Christian Centre and march to DUNLOP, Sydney Road, Umbilo, to hand-over a Memorandum of Demands to the employers. The Regional Secretary Cde MBUSO NGUBANE will led the march and addresses workers.

2. Eastern Cape, Port Elizabeth & Uitenhage
DATE: 30 August 2010
TIME: 08H00am
VENUE: Goodyear (Uitenhage), Continental (Port Elizabeth) & Bridgestone (Port Elizabeth)

Workers will demonstrate outside the premises of Goodyear, Continental and Bridgestone to be addressed by the leadership of the union in the region.

3. North West, Brits
DATE: 30 August 2010
TIME: 06H00am
VENUE: Bridgestone, Brits

Workers will demonstrate outside Bridgestone promises and the Regional Secretary Cde Menchi Motsepe will address workers.

The members of the media are hereby invited to ALL these activities to attend and report.

Contact:
Castro Ngobese
National Spokesperson – 073 299 1595


SASFU MEDIA / PRESS CONFERENCE ON THE ONGOING PUBLIC STRIKE:
SASFU 27 August 2010

All Media is invited to the Provincial Executive Committee Meeting of the South African Security Forces Union (SASFU) which will take place as follows:

SASFU will have meetings in all 9 provinces and will take decision on

1. The call for the soldiers’ participation in the current Public Sector strike.
2. The fight to oppose de-unionisation of the South African National Defence Force (SANDF)
3. Nationwide Mass Actions to fight for the reinstatement of suspended soldiers since the march to Union Buildings.

In Port Elizabeth, the meeting will be addressed by SASFU President

Date: Sunday 29 August 2010
Venue: 10th floor, FAWU Offices, Mercator Chamber, Port Elizabeth
Time: 13h00

Date: Sunday 29 August 2010
Venue: 7th floor, Vougue House, Tybault Square, Cape Town.
Time: 13h00

In Cape Town, the meeting will be addressed by SASFU Deputy President

For more information contact:
Bhekinkosi Mvovo (SASFU PRESIDENT)
Email: bwmvovo@gmail.com
Cell: 0828281648


NUMSA MEMBERS TO MARCH IN AFFLUENT AND EXCLUSIVE SURBURB OF SANDTON FOR A LIVING WAGE & SUSTAINABLE LIVELIHOODS!
Numsa 27 August 2010

The NATIONAL UNION OF METALWORKERS OF SOUTH AFRICA (NUMSA) representing 70, 000 workers working in garages, components, workshops and automotives sectors will be marching tomorrow Saturday 28 August 2010, Sandton, Gauteng province. This march forms part of the organisational strategy to exert pressure to the captains of the motor industry to accede to workers demands for improved conditions of employment and decent wages.

The march will be led by national leadership of NUMSA, namely General Secretary Cde IRVIN JIM, President Cde CEDRIC GINA, Deputy General Secretary Cde KARL CLOETE, 2nd Deputy President Cde CHRISTENE OLIVIER and joined by the 2nd Deputy President of COSATU Cde ZINGISWA LOSI and Young Communist League (YCLSA) National Secretary Cde BUTI MANAMELA.

A throng of 5,000 workers will converge at George Lea Park, Sandton in the morning to march through the streets of Sandton to hand-over a Memorandum of Demands to Business Unity South Africa (BUSA), Retailers Motor Industry (RMI), Fuel Retailers Association (FRA), Steel, Engineering Industry Federation of South Africa (SEIFSA) and NTEIA.

This march will be taking place amidst the victory of NUMSA in Court late this evening after successfully interdicting the police for their refusal to issue the union with the permit. This Court victory by NUMSA was defiance and our intentions to stop what is clearly an abuse of state organs by the ruling class to muzzle and deny workers their constitutional rights to assemble and embark on protected industrial actions. This should serve as a indication to the ruling class that workers are not blind and their refuse to be subjected to the old apartheid police tactics of trampling upon their rights.

The details of the march are as follows:

DATE: Saturday 28 August 2010
TIME: 09H00am
VENUE: George Lea Park, Sandton, Gauteng

Members of the media are hereby invited to attend and report. Please confirm attendance with NUMSA National Spokesperson Castro Ngobese @ 073 299 1595

Issued by NUMSA

Enquiries:

Castro Ngobese

National Spokesperson – 073 299 1595


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